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Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 16 of 16 results for “Venture for America”

Partner Insights Startup Culture Venture for America profiles

The Surprising Truth About Young Entrepreneurs – They’re Fewer than Ever

We are bombarded with prominent images of young people starting tech companies, but the facts tell a different story. The proportion of people ages 20 to 34 who started a business in 2013 has dropped to its lowest level in 17 years. There's a crisis in entrepreneurship, and Andrew Yang, who heads Venture for America, explains what his organization is doing about it. VfA hosts its own annual conference in Detroit immediately following Techonomy Detroit, Sept. 15th & 16th.   More

Venture for America profiles

Tax Policy Eases Life for a Big Easy Solar Startup

In 2009 Julian Thomas co-founded Joule, a New Orleans-based solar energy company that helps home and business owners install solar panels and LED lighting. He spoke to Techonomy about startups in New Orleans, the future of solar energy, and the importance of public policy for its future. His company is hosting a Venture for America fellow.   More

Venture for America profiles

LeagueSide Matches Sponsors with Community Sports

Sponsorships play a distinct role in professional sports, where the sale of jersey advertising space or stadium naming rights can help fund an elite training and coaching staff and hundred-million dollar businesses. But what about the nonprofessionals? Rising costs for community youth sports, often pose a significant challenge for young athletes. Many families struggle to afford league participation fees, equipment, tournament travel, and other expenses necessary for their children to play on a team. LeagueSide is a Philadelphia startup that hopes to combat the financial costs of youth sports by bringing together community leagues with potential sponsors.   More

Cities Startup Culture Techonomy Events

Startups, Cities, and Sustaining Innovation

The ideas are flowing fast, as is the money. Young (and old) the world over are increasingly drawn to entrepreneurship, and inventive tech solutions are emerging everywhere. Is “Silicon Valley” a spirit rather than a place? What makes a city attractive for company incubation? Is this energy likely to continue, or will cities like Detroit have trouble sustaining it? Will the successful companies of the future stay put or move elsewhere? In this session from our Sept. 16 Techonomy Detroit conference, angel investor Jill Ford, Josh Linkner of Detroit Venture Partners, VegasTechFund's Andy White, and Venture for America's Andrew Yang join moderator Andrew Keen examine how cities can grow and retain talent and innovative companies.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Detroit Needs Talented People … and It’s Getting Them

Detroit’s unique challenges have given rise to bold policy prescriptions and created a hotbed of opportunities. In 2012, a dozen smart, enterprising recent college graduates moved to Detroit. They were Venture For America Fellows, assigned to local startups to gain experience and contribute energy to Detroit's revival.   More

Cities Startup Culture

How Detroit Turned Me into a Coder and Entrepreneur

There are three things happening in my life right now that, frankly, would have shocked the college-aged Kate Catlin: I live in Detroit; I’m being trained as a coder; and I’m starting a tech company. All through college I was a gregarious environmental activist living in Washington State and happily climbing mountains every weekend. I dreamed of traveling abroad and leading political campaigns, or maybe a “social enterprise” like TOMS shoes. It almost gives me whiplash to look around now and ask, “What just happened?”   More

Cities Startup Culture

Hooked on Company-Building and Community in Detroit

Entering my senior year of college after a summer working at an investment bank, I had decided that I wanted to be an entrepreneur. As I began thinking about how to become an entrepreneur, however, I was faced with the reality that I didn’t have an idea to launch straight out of college, and even if I did, I had no idea how to go about starting a company. I was an aspiring entrepreneur without experience, mentorship, or an idea. I had a problem. Then I heard about Venture for America, and it was the perfect solution to my problem.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Venture for America’s Yang Calls Detroit an Innovation Hub

Winning innovators don’t depend on the market for opportunities; they innovate their way into them. So says Venture for America founder Andrew Yang, who talked with us at our Techonomy Detroit conference about the need for more innovation and why Detroit can help spark it. “We need to get more smart people building things. We need to get more of our talented working to solve the problems of the day,” he said, adding that Detroit's access to talent, resources, and customers to put it at the forefront of tech entrepreneurship in coming years.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Inspiration and Entrepreneurship in New Orleans

I first came to New Orleans in 2007, two years after Katrina, to enroll at Tulane University when I was 18 years old. There was still a lot to be desired, but the city never pretended to be anything other than what it was. What drew me to Tulane was not a particular career path, but a sense I had to be part of the impassioned rebuilding taking place throughout New Orleans’ communities.   More

Business Cities

This Native Detroiter Feels the Pull of Home

In the days since Techonomy Detroit, I'm more hopeful about my hometown than I have been since I left for New York to go to Columbia University 30 years ago. Yet before I headed to the conference, when I joked with media and tech pals that I was on my way to “the Paris of Southeastern Michigan,” I’d get a laugh or a look of grave concern. In their eyes, a place I love was a disaster zone, a dear family member on the critical list.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Navigating Detroit: A VFA Fellow Discovers Ideas, Energy, Opportunity

Kathy Cheng is used to walkable cities. She grew up near New York and went to college in Cambridge, Mass. Now she finds herself driving in the Motor City, as a Venture for America (VFA) fellow working at a startup in downtown Detroit. Cheng talked to Techonomy about the VFA program, adapting to Detroit, and helping the city thrive.   More

Startup Culture

Venture for America Brings a Socially-Conscious Entrepreneur Home

When Chelsea Koglmeier left Cincinnati after high school, she never thought she would return to live in her home city. But barely a year after college graduation, she’s back, working for a company that makes a mobile app for planning road trips. Koglmeier is a fellow at Venture for America, a program that places bright college grads at startups in struggling cities. Techonomy spoke with Koglmeier about creating social impact, diving into startup culture, and seeing her home city in a new light.   More

Cities

Venture for America Made This Young Easterner a Detroit Believer

I found my future on Twitter. Two weeks into a summer research internship in Singapore that I had already lost interest in, I saw the tweet that would change my life. It linked me to an article describing the kickoff event for Venture For America, a new program dedicated to placing top college graduates in startups in economically troubled cities. I knew right away what I would be doing with my first two post-collegiate years. The application process started with a written submission followed by a phone interview, and culminated in a day of group and individual interviews by VFA board members and staff. After a few tense days, VFA founder and CEO Andrew Yang called me with an offer.   More

Startup Culture

A Talent Transfusion for Scrappy Startup Hubs

Maybe Millennials aren't as selfish as people think. Some college grads are turning down high salaries in finance and consulting for entry level positions at startups in cities like Detroit, New Orleans, and Baltimore—where they can have an impact on the community while also learning important entrepreneurial skills. They are doing so with the help of Venture for America, a nonprofit that matches highly talented graduates with startup businesses in cities that need an economic boost, The New York Times reports. Founder Andrew Yang says that the program aims to improve talent allocation among bright college graduates. “Promising growth companies, companies that are five years old or less, are the consistent engine of job creation in this country,” he told Techonomy in an interview last fall.   More

Cities

Venture for America Cultivates Detroit’s Innovation Greenfield

Following our first Techonomy Detroit conference last fall, we profiled Venture for America, a program that places young tech entrepreneurs at start-ups throughout the country, targeting cities like Detroit, New Orleans, and Las Vegas that are still grappling with economic recovery. We also profiled an innovative Detroit startup called Are You a Human, which offers a secure and entertaining alternative to CAPTCHA authentication technology, designed to verify that someone using a website is a real persona and not a robot with bad intentions. Max Nussenbaum, a Venture for America fellow who was placed by the program at Are You a Human, was among several VfA fellows who attended Techonomy Detroit. In his Huffington Post blog about his experiences in Detroit, Nussenbaum argues that the city is a greenfield for innovation and experimentation.   More

Startup Culture

Venture for America Plants Budding Entrepreneurs in Urban Soil

Before the Techonomy Detroit conference in September, we talked to Venture for America founder Andrew Yang about how his new program is attracting young talent to startups in Detroit and elsewhere. Like a Teach for America for wannabe entrepreneurs, Venture for America matches the best and the brightest young graduates with startup companies in struggling cities. Ultimately the program hopes to help reinvigorate the American economy and entrepreneurial spirit, says Yang.   More