Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 11 of 11 results for “TechShop”

Business Manufacturing Startup Culture

Will Makerspaces Jumpstart a New Industrial Revolution?

After I first visited TechShop in 2006, I hypothesized that if makers could be given access to the tools of the industrial revolution at a cost they could afford, they could change the world. Nine years later we have innumerable examples of how this access has revolutionized who gets to make things, what gets made, and where and how they do it. In other words, it changes the very nature of manufacturing in America.   More

Manufacturing Techonomy Events

A Technoskeptic’s Take: Makers Are Suckers

Do-it-yourselfers with access to advanced tools and technologies are poised to democratize manufacturing, enable a bottom-up industrial revolution, reinvent retail, even remake America—at least that’s been the optimistic take. Evgeny Morozov offers a contrasting negative view on the so-called Maker Movement. In the context of a historical summary of the Arts and Crafts movement in early 1900s America, Morozov, a Belarus-born writer and Harvard history of science PhD candidate, suggests that modern "makers" are unwitting corporate pawns.   More

Business Internet of Things

Now the Maker Movement Has Intel Inside

Intel's new CEO Brian Krzanich says he's been a "maker" for years, and he's leading the chipmaker into new friendships in the DIY world. Last week Krzanich unveiled the Intel Galileo board, an Arduino-compatible development board, and today Intel announced a corporate sponsorship of TechShop.   More

Manufacturing

TechShop: Democratizing Manufacturing and Creating Personal Industrial Revolutions

“It took the U.S. and Europe 150 years to go through the Industrial Revolution. Now, you can go through your own personal industrial revolution in 90 days.” At least that’s what TechShop CEO Mark Hatch told Yahoo! Small Business writer Adrienne Burke (also a regular contributor to Techonomy). TechShop is a membership-based DIY workshop with six locations around the country, each with about $1 million worth of advanced machinery and software. Members pay just $125 dollars for monthly access to a plethora of design, prototyping, and manufacturing tools.   More

Business Manufacturing

TechShop Seeks Big Bucks Using JOBS Act

With the public announcement of a $60 million investment offering this morning, TechShop is among the first to attempt to leverage eased fundraising regulations made possible by the JOBS Act. An 80-year SEC ban on general solicitation and advertising for certain offerings was lifted today as a result of the act. TechShop CEO Mark Hatch, who spoke at Techonomy Detroit 2012, told us Friday that the company is seeking $30 million in a Series B Preferred stock offering to support corporate overhead, and $30 million more in loans to fund construction of at least 11 new local TechShop facilities, support the new location in Pittsburgh, and relocate the one in Menlo Park.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Detroit’s Workfolio Helps Anyone Build Their Own Personal Website

Workfolio was founded in Detroit, but today also operates out of New York. The company aims to make creating online professional profile websites intuitive for everyone in the working world. Techonomy spoke with Workfolio Founder and CEO Charles Pooley about personal branding, how he got into DIY Web design, and what sets Detroit apart from other cities.   More

Business Cities

As the Maker Movement Surges, So Do “Stories” of Creation

On a stretch of San Francisco's Mission Street where multi-tenant housing residents, a homeless population, and employees of the hulking Federal building tensely coexist, a “civic hack” is transforming a vacant building. The two-month [freespace] experiment undertaken by social entrepreneurs, artists, activists, techies, and locals is changing the neighborhood. The truth is that sharing space can be difficult. The quiet, well-equipped home office or garage workshop outfitted with your own sharp tools seems safer and easier, albeit less dynamic. But collaborative spaces offer clear benefits: serendipitous connections spark ideas, learning, and opportunities to tackle larger challenges.   More

Manufacturing Techonomy Events

Why Making Things Still Matters

Innovation and the desire for innovation are nationally and globally pervasive. But by any measure of geographic or economic density, most of us still see Silicon Valley as the leader and lodestar of innovation. It’s interesting to take a moment and reflect on the very name Silicon Valley. It is, after all, named after a chemical element and a technology for making things. At its roots, Silicon Valley was about making transistors, integrated circuits and chips, and, of course, the application of these for computing and software.   More

Government Learning Manufacturing

Defense Department Funds High School “Hackerspaces”

A new $10 million federal program is bringing “hackerspaces” to high schools, the New York Times reports. Hackerspaces are community groups for hackers to build and invent technology (and take things apart). They are considered incubators for innovation and a major part of the DIY movement—but the high school program has sparked some controversy.   More

Jobs Manufacturing Startup Culture

Turning Makers Into Middle Class Manufacturers

When you walk through TechShop just outside of Detroit, you see all sorts of contraptions and manufacturing projects—from bipedal robot legs hanging off a wooden stand to super-stretch cargo bikes that can carry big loads. Wind your way past the laser cutters, 3D printers, CNC machines—past the wood shop and the metal-bending station—and you will find a hallway hung with a half-dozen blackboards from floor to ceiling.   More

Business

The “Corporation of One” Has Arrived

Politicians may argue whether “corporations are people.” Techonomists might ask a different question: Can people be corporations? The dictionary definition is "a group of people authorized by law to act as a single entity.” That a large organization can accomplish more complex tasks than a lone worker is wisdom as old as the industrial revolution. But is it still true in a digital world?   More