fbpx

Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results for “Scott Cook”

Startup Culture Techonomy Events

Marc Benioff on the Impact of Entrepreneurs Under 30

In this video from the "Revolutions in Progress" session at Techonomy 2011 in Tucson, Ariz., salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff discusses what he sees as an emerging model for business. Entrepreneurs under 30 are revolutionizing the way that companies do business, he says, from embracing and developing new technologies to doing away with the old bureaucratic structure. These new 20-something CEOs will change the way we do business, says Benioff.   More

Learning Techonomy Events

Scott Cook on How Technology Can Revolutionize Education

In this video from the "Revolutions in Progress" session at Techonomy 2011 in Tucson, Ariz., Scott Cook, Founder and Chairman of Intuit, discusses how technology can revolutionize education in the same way it has transformed the music and entertainment industries. Digital technology has given musicians and artists a global reach that was unfathomable 100 years ago. Why not treat education in the same way, suggests Cook, and give students access to the best teachers and lessons available using new technologies? Roger McNamee, Managing Director of Elevation Partners, moderated the session.   More

Business Techonomy Events

Scott Cook on Scientific Experimentation in Business

In this video from the "Revolutions in Progress" session at Techonomy 2011, in Tucson, Ariz., Scott Cook, Founder and Chairman of Intuit, tells two stories about how scientific experimentation helped institutions find innovative solutions to complex problems. First, he describes how junior-level staff at his company created a text-message notification system for farmers in India to alert them about crop prices in nearby markets. Senior management initially doubted the tool's viability, but it went on to significantly improve the livelihood of over 400,000 Indian farmers. Second, he profiles the Chinese city of Shenzhen, where in the 1980s government officials allowed local markets, instead of communist government regulations, to dictate economic growth, providing a successful model for the rest of China.   More