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Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results for “open-source”

Government

Can Open-Source Voting Tech Fix the U.S. Elections System?

American voting technology is trapped in the last millennium. This lifeline to democracy is kept secret—closed off from public inspection and controlled by large businesses. It is decades old to boot. Our voting methods ought to be at least as cutting edge as our selfie apps, but they’re not. Open-source technology could offer a solution that upends the entire elections technology market, dislodging incumbent voting machine companies and putting the electorate at the helm.   More

Cities Techonomy Events

Open Sourcing the Neighborhood

Rapid change in cities creates highly legible moments: the material reality of new buildings, expanding transport systems, modest shops replaced by luxury shops and modest middle-classes displaced by the rich professional class, or a bike-path where there had been none. And when rapid change happens simultaneously in several cities with at least some comparable conditions, it makes it possible to see how diverse the spatial outcomes can be in spite of similar underlying dynamics, such as the rise of mega-structures or of one-way streets.   More

Business Government

Abolish Patents to Spark Innovation, Fed Paper Urges

Researchers at the US Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis say that the patent system should be abolished, SmartPlanet reports. Innovation will come from a patentless, cooperative environment in which technologies and discoveries are shared.   More

Learning Manufacturing

From Dinosaur Bones to Cookies, 3D Printing Expands in Colleges

Colleges are finding more uses for 3D printing, from art students creating sculptures of futuristic animals, to engineering students developing zero gravity fuel storage, to biology professors replicating dinosaur bones. All disciplines have the potential to benefit from 3D printing, the Chronicle of Higher Education reports, especially as the technology becomes more sophisticated and less expensive. Many professors are supporters of controversial open-source 3D printers, an affordable do-it-yourself approach where printers are designed from online instructions based on expired patents. Despite impending patent disputes, proponents see open-source 3D printers as a way to bring the technology to the masses, offer more experimentation in the classroom, and attract younger students to STEM fields. One university class even printed 8,000 edible cookies for visiting high-school students—a huge hit for the potential engineers of the future.   More