Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results for “MIT Media Lab”

Analytics & Data Cities Internet of Things

Smart Neighborhood Data Can Help Small Business

As cities turn themselves into smart cities, a critical component is small business. GoDaddy joined with the Social Computing group at the MIT Media Lab to install sensors in Boston’s Downtown Crossing neighborhood to collect data and use it to help small businesses. Info about pedestrian and vehicle movement, air quality and noise will be combined with retail information in hopes of helping them compete and thrive. I'll talk about this at Techonomy NYC.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Energy & Green Tech Internet of Things

Food Production in a Technology-driven Economy

The Open Agriculture Initiative at the MIT Media Lab aims to drive a paradigm shift from the industrial to the networked age of agricultural production—giving rise to a computationally-based food systems revolution that will account for the ecological, environmental, economic, and societal implications of producing food. Making agricultural practices radically transparent will improve access to fresh, nutritious foods, reduce spoilage and waste, and create communities built on a shared platform and shared data.   More

Global Tech Techonomy Events

Cyborgs from Sierra Leone: Polymath David Sengeh Brings Prosthetics to the People

David Sengeh tells me he'll have to delay our phone interview. “I am sorry to do this but there’s a last minute need for me to attend an Ebola meeting.” Sengeh is a multi-faceted kind of guy. After all, before he started designing prosthetics, he did vaccine research. He grew up in Sierra Leone, where the Ebola epidemic has been harshest. So the 27-year-old MIT PhD student, biomedical engineer and inventor doesn't hesitate to take a few hours away from talking to Techonomy, not to mention writing his dissertation, looking for a job, leading a youth foundation, designing clothes, making music or playing soccer.   More

Partner Insights

Your Computer Will Feel Your Pain

What if your computer could empathize with you? The evolving field known as affective computing is likely to make it happen soon. Scientists and engineers are developing systems and devices that can recognize, interpret, process, and simulate human affects or emotions. It is an interdisciplinary field spanning computer science, psychology, and cognitive science. While its origins can be traced to longstanding philosophical enquiries into emotion, a 1995 paper on affective computing by Rosalind Picard catalyzed modern progress.   More