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Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 20 of 26 results for “Mark Zuckerberg”

Global Tech Media & Marketing Net Giants Tech & Society

Outlaw? Pariah? Renegade Empire? Digesting the WSJ Series About Facebook

How can one company make so many mistakes? An astonishing reportorial coup by the Wall Street Journal is rattling Zuckerberg's empire.   More

Media & Marketing Net Giants Space

What the Moon and the Metaverse Have in Common

Uncharted territory. The lure of the unknown. And just like with the explorers of yore, the course of history will inevitably be altered by greed, motive, and human error.   More

Net Giants Tech & Society

Facebook’s New Face: Dishonesty

A book and numerous other recent accounts point to a new chink in Facebook’s armor: overwhelming evidence it can’t be trusted. Could that help force reform?   More

Global Tech Net Giants Tech & Society

Why Zuckerberg Is Not Worthy

Here’s why the CEO and Facebook should not be a model for leaders determined to do right by all stakeholders. At Techonomy we’ve been thinking about that as we work to compile a list of “Worthy” tech companies.   More

Global Tech Government Society

Can Tech Help trump Hate?

How did technological change and "innovation" contribute to bringing the U.S. to this point of fracture and animosity? And how can tech play a more active and consciously constructive role helping us get past it? In general the tech industry has not focused sufficiently on these questions. Now it must.   More

Business Healthcare Opinion Techonomy Events

Techonomy’s Top 5 Articles for 2016

Techonomy's five most-viewed stories included reports about our historic conversation with Mark Zuckerberg, a research psychologist's analysis of why so many White Americans support Trump, a trenchant set of predictions about VR and AR, and two of our many articles on healthcare. One explains why Singapore is becoming a digital health hub, and the other examines the rich potential of data.   More

Healthcare Techonomy Events

At Techonomy 2016, a Vision of Disrupted Healthcare

Medicine will be unrecognizable in the coming decades, with technology changes leading to better care at home, vanishing hospitals, and doctors who can monitor patients’ activity and health between visits. Leaders in various sectors who spoke at Techonomy 2016 contributed to the futuristic picture.   More

Business Society Techonomy Events

Facebook Influenced Election? Crazy Idea, Says Zuckerberg

Dismissing the idea that fake stories in Facebook's News Feed influenced the outcome of the U.S. election, Mark Zuckerberg, speaking at Techonomy16, grabbed global headlines and no breaks from tech reporters. It was by no means the only thing he discussed, but it got all the coverage.   More

Business Community Insights Society

From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg: The Transformation of Business

Six hundred years ago, Gutenberg’s press ushered in an era of mass communication. Radio, TV, and film all broadcast a single message and make a clear distinction between broadcaster and audience. Today's digital platforms create a new world of mass collaboration, with more distributed, diverse and personalized interactions. In this “many-to-many” world, we are equally broadcaster and audience. We are all co-creators.   More

Business

What to Expect from Oculus’ Big Event Today

The Oculus event marks a milestone for the company and for its owner Facebook. While its Oculus Samsung Gear VR viewer for Samsung smartphones has been on the market awhile, it has been limited to people who have a couple specific models of smartphone and also to very limited amounts of VR content, generally of a much lower quality than will soon be possible. Today's 1:00 pm ET event marks the first time Oculus has told the world exactly what kind of experience to expect from its flagship PC-connected device, which we hope will emerge later this year.   More

Global Tech

China Reaches out to Facebook in Growing Courtship

I have to commend Mark Zuckerberg for his tenacity, after the Facebook founder once again made headlines for receiving a visit from a top Chinese Internet official visiting the U.S. There are several interesting things about this latest development involving Zuckerberg’s endless quest to bring Facebook to China, beginning with the source of this latest news.   More

Global Tech

Facebook’s Zuckerberg Seeks China Entree at Tsinghua

I previously wrote that Apple’s plain-spoken CEO Tim Cook should consider buying a second home in China due to his frequent visits to the country, and the same could be said for Facebook’s more brash founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg. While Cook’s frequent visits are quite official and include many stops at government and company offices, Zuckerberg has been far more low-key in his equally regular visits due to Facebook’s lack of official presence in the country where its website is formally blocked.   More

Global Tech

How Big Can Zuckerberg Make the Net?

How much difference can one company make? Mark Zuckerberg appears to be setting out to test that question with his immodest goal of connecting everyone on the planet to the Internet. While many companies talk about "doing well by doing good," Facebook's Internet.org initiative makes most other corporate projects for social betterment look banal. But such extreme ambition is not illogical. A unique combination of circumstances confers on Facebook a position—and perhaps a responsibility—unlike any other company. Facebook's site is the most popular on the global Internet. Over one billion people now use it on phones, making it the most popular mobile app as well. The Internet itself, in turn, is an unprecedented tool for social value and growth, transforming business and individual opportunity around the world.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Government Jobs

Techonomic Top 5: Federal Inefficiency, Chromosome Breakthrough, Virtual Employers, and More

Every week we spotlight techonomic happenings on the Web and beyond, picking people, companies, and trends that exemplify tech’s ever-growing role in business and society. Here’s what’s got our attention.   More

Business

Jaron Lanier on Facebook and the Creepy Possibilities for Virtual Reality

When Facebook announced last week that it had agreed to acquire Oculus VR, “the leader in virtual reality technology,” for $2 billion, techies and journalists everywhere wondered: What does Jaron Lanier think of this? Lanier, the dreadlocked futurist now working at Microsoft Research, was a virtual reality pioneer—he coined the term. More recently, he’s been a prolific critic of so-called Web 2.0 companies like Google and Facebook, bucking very publicly against their business models in books like "Who Owns the Future?" The Fiscal Times spoke with Lanier this week to get more of his thoughts about the deal, Mark Zuckerberg’s vision, and the future of virtual reality. Among his insights: “The biggest variable as to how creepy Facebook will be in the future is whether Zuck has kids or not.”   More

Business

Kirkpatrick: Zuckerberg’s Plan for Global Connectivity “Impressive and Amazing”

It may be the tech acquisition everyone's talking about, but Facebook's $19 billion buyout of WhatsApp is just one step along the way of Mark Zuckerberg's larger-than-life quest: to connect every single person on the planet. Zuckerberg joined Techonomy's David Kirkpatrick onstage at Barcelona's Mobile World Congress Monday to talk WhatsApp, the future of communications, and, most salient in Zuckerberg's mind, his global connectivity initiative Internet.org. Launched in August 2013, Internet.org is a global partnership between Facebook, Samsung, Ericsson, MediaTek, Nokia, Opera, and Qualcomm, which positions Internet access as a human right.   More

Business

Zuckerberg’s Vision for Building a Benevolent Internet

Once your Internet company has amassed over 1 billion subscribers around the world, what’s your next move? The most obvious answer is to figure out how to leverage your extraordinary user base to generate revenue. But Mark Zuckerberg’s ambitions for Facebook have always been more complex than simple profit motive. For starters, he’s not content connecting just 1 billion people. As he told Techonomy’s David Kirkpatrick this Monday at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, “Our vision isn’t to try to connect one-seventh of the world; it’s to try to connect everyone.” In order to do that, Facebook has to rally other billion-user companies to its cause. “We have to form these partnerships because no one company can change the way that the Internet works by itself,” said Zuckerberg.   More

Business

Could WhatsApp Possibly Be Worth $19 Billion?

The past year or so have seen a headlong rush around the world towards simple messaging applications. Facebook's purchase of WhatsApp shows it cannot ignore the rise not only of that service but also of others including WeChat, Line, Viber, and Kik. These services are beginning to play the role that Facebook has mostly played around the world--default mobile app for communication. Their simplicity is their strength. While Facebook is not as existentially threatened as this excellent Buzzfeed article suggests, it's a worthy read if you want to understand the macro context in which Mark Zuckerberg felt he had no choice but to act.   More

Business

Kirkpatrick: $19 Billion WhatsApp Deal Keeps Facebook on Cutting Edge

Facebook stunned the tech world Wednesday, announcing its biggest acquisition yet—a $19 billion deal to buy messaging application WhatsApp. Techonomy’s David Kirkpatrick appeared on Bloomberg West Wednesday and on Bloomberg Surveillance Thursday to talk about Mark Zuckerberg’s big move. “I think this shows that he’s willing to pay whatever it takes to keep on the cutting edge of what is going to be important down the road,” Kirkpatrick, who is also a Bloomberg contributing editor, told Surveillance’s Tom Keene on Thursday.   More

Business

Four Reasons Facebook Became a Colossus

The first time I met Mark Zuckerberg I told him he seemed like a natural CEO. He acted offended. "I never wanted to run a company," he said bluntly. Then he added, perfunctorily, "A business is a good vehicle for getting stuff done." But that was September 2006. Facebook was just two-and-a-half years old. He impressed me so much I went back and wrote a column for Fortune, where I worked, entitled Why Facebook Matters. Now the company is ten. (It launched February 4, 2004.) Zuckerberg is 29, not 22. He is no longer embarrassed to be a businessman. By a lucky coincidence of timing, Facebook's quarterly results announced just last Wednesday were spectacular. As the company hits this historic landmark, its financial foundation is provably rock-solid.   More