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Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results for “MakerBot”

Global Tech Manufacturing

Techonomy’s Kirkpatrick Moderates CFR’s 3D-Printing Panel

It's hard to believe you can manufacture your own toys and tchotchkes—not in a factory, but in your home. But companies including MakerBot and Solidoodle are already making it possible, selling low-end 3D printers to consumers for as little as $499. The printers spray liquified powders in thousands of layers to form almost any imaginable shape. And industrial models can even "print" objects made out of Titanium, glass, and many other materials.   More

Business

Think 3D Printing Is Exploding Now? Wait Till the Patents Expire

Last week 3D-printing industry watcher Terry Wohlers told Techonomy "the sky is the limit" when it comes to the technology's potential to transform manufacturing. Today, tech reporter Christopher Mims says you can look for the heavens to open up in February 2014. That's when patents are set to expire on "selective laser sintering," the key to industrial-grade 3D printing. Laser sintering 3D printers, writes Mims, can take a designer "from idea to finished product in a matter of hours, and create finished products to sell to the public."   More

Manufacturing

Staples Brings 3D Printers to the Mass Market

Designers have used 3D-printing websites like Shapeways to manufacture and market their wares for several years now, while some intrepid DIY makers have taken production into their homes by investing in desktop 3D printers from New York-based MakerBot. But 3D printing machines have yet to make their way into mass-market retail stores. Until now. Last week Staples announced that it will sell the Cube 3D printer, made by South Carolina-based 3D Systems Corp., in select stores. Priced at $1,299, the machine sells for almost half the cost of Makerbot's Replicator 2.   More

Business Manufacturing

3D Printers Get Cheap, and the Transformation of Manufacturing Gets Closer

MakerBot of Brooklyn released new 3D printers, and it's a breakthrough. One costs only $2,199, but has extraordinary capabilities. MakerBot also announced it is opening a store in Soho. At Techonomy we believe 3D printing is one of those unexpected results of the digital revolution likely to upend industries and recast competition. Those who get it will win, and those who oppose it will lose. Even as 3D printing enters more and more material areas, so it will be used for larger products. We've heard of plans to build airplane wings, even entire buildings, with future (near future) versions of this technology. Wired's new issue puts MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis on the cover with the headline "This Machine will Change the World."   More