fbpx

Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results for “energy”

Energy & Green Tech Internet of Things

How The Internet of Things Will Fight Climate Change

The Internet of Things may shift how our energy system works as much as the steam engine reconfigured Western economies at the start of the industrial revolution. As the world focuses on its climate crisis, we must become more energy-efficient, produce less carbon dioxide, and power more things with electricity from wind and solar. IoT can make it possible.   More

Global Tech Government Techonomy Events

How to Meet the World’s Grand Challenges

The best opportunities will come from creating the greatest impact on the biggest realms of human activity, like healthcare, food, water, energy, and education. How can businesses rise to the occasion and focus on the things that really matter? How can they best partner with governments and NGOs to implement the solutions? At the Techonomy 2014 conference in Half Moon Bay, Calif., Larry Brilliant of the Skoll Global Threats Fund, Pfizer's Geno Germano, Leila Janah of the Sama Group, and Ericsson's Rima Qureshi discuss applying tech tools to global challenges in a session moderated by The Economist's Matthew Bishop.   More

Energy & Green Tech

Harnessing the Power of Algae

A California researcher is working to create a new type of battery, powered not by lithium, alkaline, or lead-acid, but by ... algae? Yes, reports TechCrunch, algae batteries, which charge faster and for longer than their traditional counterparts, have the capacity to power a smartphone, a tablet, and even a Tesla. Research has already shown the power of algae, but Adam Freeman, founder of alGAS, says he's about to create the first algae battery that could power a car--with a charge 200 times greater than current lithium-based batteries can provide, and for a fraction of the price. "Think of driving your car on a living battery that charges in seconds with a battery that costs almost nothing and is actually good for the environment," Freeman told TechCrunch.   More

Energy & Green Tech

UK Inaugurates World’s Largest Offshore Windfarm

While America celebrated the anniversary of its independence, our erstwhile colonizers celebrated the possibility of energy independence. July 4th marked the official opening of the London Array, the world's largest offshore windfarm. Situated in the outer Thames Estuary off the Kent and Essex coasts, the facility boasts 175 turbines capable of powering two thirds of the homes in Kent. In a statement, British Prime Minister David Cameron said that the project demonstrates that "Britain is a great country to come and invest in, and it's meant jobs for local people and it means clean, green energy for half a million homes in our country." These are not empty words. Britain's newest windfarm represents an impressive convergence of international innovation. It is owned by Denmark's Dong Energy, Germany's E.On, and Masdar of Abu Dhabi, and has the capacity to power 470,000 homes.   More

Energy & Green Tech

Energy Data Management Heads to the Cloud

Managing “Big Data” is a big issue these days, especially within the energy industry, SmartPlanet reports. Companies are compiling huge amounts of data about energy supply and consumption, and cloud computing is enabling them to forecast future usage and even create alternative energy models.   More

Energy & Green Tech

Japanese Government Is Strong, Then Weak, On Nuclear Power

Nuclear power is a big deal in Japan. Before the Fukushima power plant emergency in 2011, more than 30 percent of the country’s electricity came from nuclear reactors. Now most Japanese people are adamantly against nuclear power—yet the government seems indecisive. They announced last Friday a plan to completely phase out nuclear power by 2040, but backed off only five days later. In less than a week, the government’s commitment to end its reliance on nuclear power “transformed from bold determination into sheepish second thoughts,” SmartPlanet reports. Nuclear opponents are disappointed, but, as some point out, the country’s nuclear future depends on more than the government taking a firm stance—it is also contingent on the will of electricity users, technological innovation, and the global energy outlook.   More