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Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 17 of 17 results for “DNA sequencing”

Bio & Life Sciences

Could a Microbe Transplant Make You Thinner? (And Other Amazing Things About Bacteria and Antibiotics)

We are in the earliest days of understanding the human microbiome—the communities of microbes that live in and on our bodies—but already scientists are getting a sense of the incredible complexity of this ecosystem and its interaction with us. These advances were made possible just in the past decade by the latest DNA sequencers and other technologies that can scan and analyze huge numbers of microbes at a time. This understanding may enable radical new techniques for weight control, among other revolutionary implications.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Could DNA Tools Help Manage Ebola?

Recent innovations in DNA analysis have given scientists and epidemiologists new ways to track and treat outbreaks, and many of these tools are already being deployed in the battle against Ebola and other diseases. Technologies at work today, as well as those expected in the years to come, will be of real utility in helping the biomedical community understand these pathogens better, provide a real-time warning system about outbreaks, and trace their source and spread over time.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Diagnosing the First Patient: Genomics to the Rescue

Nic Volker. Beatrice Rienhoff. Alexis and Noah Beery. If you happen to be a scientist or clinician in the genomics field, you already know the topic of this article just from those four names. Each is a child who suffered from a mysterious or even one-of-a-kind disease. Collectively, they endured years in hospitals, met dozens of doctors, took countless tests to achieve that precious objective: a diagnosis. And for each of these kids, DNA sequencing was critical to providing that answer.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

The Coming Era of Personal Genomics

If the idea of having everyone’s genome sequenced at birth brings images to your mind from "Blade Runner" or "Gattaca," you’re not alone. The tremendous potential of understanding and using genomic information from birth to death suggests motives both beneficent and nefarious. This path is quite realistic, given the galloping state of modern genomic science. That’s one reason genomics will loom large at our upcoming Techonomy Bio conference in Mountain View, Calif., on June 17. In this article we conduct a Techonomy thought exercise: envisioning a world in which everyone has his or her genome sequenced at birth (or, in some cases, even earlier).   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Talking with the Government’s $1,000 Genome Man

There’s been a lot of attention paid to the tremendous progress in making DNA sequencing so cheap that scanning a person’s genome could cost just $1,000. This pricing free-fall has occurred markedly faster than with comparable drops for other technologies, such as computers. Most people would assume that credit is due mostly to the progress made by companies, but in reality the man most responsible for approaching the $1,000 genome is Jeffery Schloss, an unassuming federal employee who works as a program director for the National Human Genome Research Institute.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Business

FDA Tells 23andMe to Stop Selling DNA Tests

Citing concerns "about the public health consequences of inaccurate results" from its Personal Genome Service, the FDA on Friday told 23andMe CEO Ann Wojcicki in a stern Warning Letter that her company must "immediately discontinue marketing" the service "until such time as it receives FDA marketing authorization for the device." The Twittersphere responded with shock and some outrage.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Are Flash Sales Coming to Consumer Genomics?

Could consumers be persuaded to snatch up DNA sequences as must-have accessories? With former Gilt Groupe President Andy Page in a new leadership role, 23andMe might be able to swing that. The personal genetics company began late last year offering its Personal Genome service for $99 and set a goal to serve 1 million customers in 2013.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Why Medical Research Does Big Data Wrong

Medicine is among many sectors waiting to be transformed by big data, we often hear. Conducting global studies of disease progression, integrating health records electronically, or analyzing petabyte-size banks of DNA sequence data should hasten the pace of medical discovery and lead to faster cures, the thinking goes. Not so fast, says computational biologist Michael Liebman. Health information is only as useful as the thought that went into gathering it. And Liebman says not enough thought is being applied to what data should be collected in healthcare.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

A Cancer Genomics Arms Race Is Underway

Supercomputers and DNA sequencing instruments are the weapons of choice in an "arms race within the war on cancer." Medical centers in New York City alone are reportedly spending more than $1 billion on building, equipping, and staffing new genomic research centers.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Technology to Unlock Cancer Data for Patients’ Sake

"If you think about the scientific revolutions that have occurred in history, they've been driven by one thing--the availability of data. From Copernicus to quantum mechanics, it's data that drives innovation." So says computational biologist John Quackenbush in an interview in the May edition of Fast Company. And despite all the talk about massive amounts of genomic data being churned out by next-generation sequencing instruments, much of it is not actually available, at least not in the way Quackenbush and a lot of cancer patients want it to be.   More

Arts & Culture Bio & Life Sciences

Cancer Genetics Goes Indie: Decoding Annie Parker Premieres

One thing was clear at last night’s New York premiere of Decoding Annie Parker, a movie about a woman with breast cancer: the film is a labor of love made by people who believe the dramatized true story they tell is important. No major studios were involved, and though it has a top-shelf cast (including Helen Hunt, Bradley Whitford, Rashida Jones, and Aaron Paul), the actors agreed to work for a fraction of their usual fees. When Annie Parker opens in select theaters this summer, it will be because a group of writers, donors, and cancer advocates were committed to sharing the lessons of Annie’s story.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

How Graphene Could Transform DNA Sequencing and Cancer Research

In 2004, two UK scientists used a piece of Scotch tape to isolate single layers of graphene from a block of graphite, or pencil lead. Ever since, physicists and materials scientists have been trying to take advantage of the nanomaterial’s unique properties to use it in the construction of transistors, capacitors, and solar cells. The UK researchers, Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov won the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics for their work, which extended well beyond the tape trick of course. In recent years, graphene has come to the attention of biomedical researchers, who think its malleability makes it ideal for biological applications, ranging from disinfecting hospitals to detecting tumors to delivering drugs to sequencing DNA.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Government

How the FDA’s Best Intentions Are Slowing the Genomics Revolution

Even as life-science companies pound out DNA sequencing improvements fast enough to make the computing industry look downright sedentary, the industry has been hindered in implementing its many advances so they can help patients in clinical settings. One major cause is the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which has asserted it will regulate these next-generation sequencing tools—but has not yet decided what will be regulated, how evaluations will take place, or when this oversight might kick in. With widespread uncertainty about the regulatory environment, companies developing genomic products for clinical use have been in limbo, and the venture capitalists who haven’t fled the space are tightening their belts.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Medal of Science Recipient Lee Hood Says “Systems Medicine” Will Reduce Costs

Leroy Hood, who was awarded the National Medal of Science today by President Obama, shared a prediction earlier this week that the President probably wishes would come true during his final term: the convergence of genomics, diagnostics, digital technologies, and quantified self tools will send healthcare costs plummeting. Hood gives us a decade to get there.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Why Memorize Shakespeare’s Sonnets When You Can Encode Them on a Speck of DNA?

Technology has enabled us to collect and analyze unprecedented amounts of data. As Ray Kurzweil commented at the Techonomy 2012 conference, "The kid in Africa with a smartphone has access to more intelligently searchable information than the President of the United States did 15 years ago." But how do we go about storing all of this data? Hard drives and the Cloud require an electricity supply, while other storage devices such as disks or magnetic tape deteriorate over time. The answer to this archiving conundrum may lie in our DNA. As reported on NPR, scientists at the European Bioinformatics Institute have successfully stored all of Shakespeare's sonnets on tiny particles of DNA.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Holiday Gift Ideas for Techonomic People

With the holidays drawing near, we thought it was the perfect time to look at the top items on any Techonomic wishlist—gifts that make the most of advances in science and technology to help build a better life. Whether “better” means fuller, healthier, or simply more fun is entirely up to you.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Consumer Genetics Starts to Pay Off

One of the biggest hopes when the $3 billion Human Genome Project launched two decades ago was that it would one day put lots of basic genetic information into the hands of the general public. It's taken a long time, and many argue that the whole project was a waste of money. But in research labs and technology incubators, real advances are underway. The nascent field of consumer genetics is starting to fulfill the potential of the Human Genome Project.   More