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Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results for “Chronicle of Higher Education”

Davos 2015 Learning

Davos 2015: Codecademy’s Zach Sims on Creating New Jobs

Codecademy's Zach Sims visits Hub Culture at the World Economic Forum Davos 2015. Sims discusses the power of technology to create new jobs and new job categories, and to educate workers for those jobs.   More

Learning

The Markle Foundation’s Philip Zelikow on Reconfiguring Education for the Digital Age

“Imagine an education system that’s built around unleashing the power of the individual,” says Philip Zelikow, professor of history at the University of Virginia and visiting managing director at the Markle Foundation. Zelikow envisions a new paradigm where someone can get the training and education they need even if it means starting classes in the middle of a traditional semester. Does that mean students will just pop online to get the credits they need? Not necessarily. “The future may be more likely a mixture of online plus people,” says Zelikow, with “navigators” helping to guide students through online options and pair them with real-world tutors.   More

Learning

Higher Ed for a Networked Age: A View From Inside NYU

To answer the research questions that have emerged during the first two decades of digital mass media, a new academic discipline is emerging in universities around the world. We might call it Network Studies—an interdisciplinary field that synthesizes network theory, media history, and mathematics, along with various social, cognitive, and computer sciences to research a global network culture that is morphing with increasing velocity.   More

Learning Manufacturing

From Dinosaur Bones to Cookies, 3D Printing Expands in Colleges

Colleges are finding more uses for 3D printing, from art students creating sculptures of futuristic animals, to engineering students developing zero gravity fuel storage, to biology professors replicating dinosaur bones. All disciplines have the potential to benefit from 3D printing, the Chronicle of Higher Education reports, especially as the technology becomes more sophisticated and less expensive. Many professors are supporters of controversial open-source 3D printers, an affordable do-it-yourself approach where printers are designed from online instructions based on expired patents. Despite impending patent disputes, proponents see open-source 3D printers as a way to bring the technology to the masses, offer more experimentation in the classroom, and attract younger students to STEM fields. One university class even printed 8,000 edible cookies for visiting high-school students—a huge hit for the potential engineers of the future.   More