From the Magazine Healthcare International Affairs

The Global Healthcare Revolution Will Be Technologized

Improving global health is the biggest story of all, and tech is playing a major role. Telemedicine, drone deliveries, and 3D printing are all helping people in less-developed countries get healthier. This article from our latest Techonomy magazine visits Haiti, Malawi, and Kenya, where groups like Doctors Without Borders and Chicago's Field Ready are applying tech to bring relief and hope.   More

Analytics & Data

Is AI the Missing Link in Biometric Security?

Passwords are one of tech's biggest problems--too hard to remember and still insecure. Now that many of us use fingerprints to unlock a phone, why can't we use biometrics to replace passwords? Soon it should happen, once we deploy artificial intelligence alongside biometrics. It's still hard to know if the biometric data is from a real person and not a "spoof."   More

Business Community Insights Managing

Instant Enterprises and Techonomic Leadership: Is your Organization Ready?

Two-thirds of U.S. CEOs believe the next 36 months will be more critical than the previous 50 years. More than half of the Fortune 500 has been wiped out since 2000. We need a new kind of "techonomic" leadership. But to get there, training needs to become more about systems than than just better-trained people.   More

Healthcare Opinion

Why Isn’t America’s Healthcare Debate about Health?

Why aren't "reformers" talking about making Americans healthier rather than taking a stilted, partisan approach to "healthcare reform"? Writer Meredith Salisbury says we are not asking some basic questions about U.S. insurance and policy. We've got to start.   More

Opinion

We Should Rename “Artificial Intelligence” (A Modest Proposal)

"Artificial Intelligence" is phrase of the year, yet the term is widely called misleading. And it's ridiculed by industry CEOs. But what can we use instead? "Augmented intelligence"? "Intelligence amplification"? We have a proposal that points beyond flat-footed notions towards the positive future we still believe in.   More

Business From the Magazine Innovation

Big Companies are Learning to Work with Small Ones (But It’s Not Easy)

Big established companies are acquiring, investing in, or partnering with startups in record numbers. But how can incumbents do it right, moving quickly and learning from their smaller brethren? General Motors and Banco Santander are among those finding success.
(From the latest Techonomy magazine)   More

Science

CRISPR’s Unknown Cousin—The Promising Genetic Boost

Radical gene-editing technology CRISPR is in the news and rightly celebrated, but another form of genetic manipulation, known as "boosting," may reshape how we face a wide range of conditions. It shows dramatic promise for treating genetic diseases like hemophilia B and sickle cell disease, but could ultimately even help combat aging itself.   More

Business Opinion

Zuckerberg is Changing—Can Facebook Catch Up?

Building communities is hard. Mark Zuckerberg now wants Facebook to deliberately do more of it and to "bring the world closer together." But Yatish Rajawat of India's LocalCircles has actually been managing online purpose-based communities, and learned difficult lessons in the process. Is Facebook really ready to follow its leader?   More

Business Community Insights Security & Privacy

Delaware Drives Blockchain Innovation

Delaware is the corporate home to the biggest tech companies and many others in the Fortune 500, but it wants to continue to innovate in the services and tools that it offers companies. So the state is breaking new ground in regulation by facilitating the use of blockchain technology for record keeping and other purposes. On August 1st, the state's initial blockchain law goes into effect.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Science

Funding Cuts—Even Threatened Ones—Wreak Havoc on Biomedical Science

The United States faces a biomedical funding crisis. The Trump administration has proposed budget cuts that would slash scientific research. Though Congress hasn't yet gone along, the fears that the process has generated are already causing tangible harm in the scientific community. Concern about cuts is stalling progress on drug discovery and other healthcare innovations.   More

Business Community Insights The Internet

Winners and Losers in Next-Generation Internet Infrastructure

Global communications networks are at least as critical today as roads and bridges, but unlike most physical infrastructure, they aren't improved the same way. Software has emerged as the centerpiece for digital infrastructure. It means we can move more quickly, and along the way improve society.   More

From the Magazine International Affairs Startup Culture

How Connections Help Place the Displaced

In the midst of a devastating refugee crisis in Syria and elsewhere, startups across the globe are now applying networked technology to help the displaced. Both for-profit and nonprofit organizations are helping people find homes, jobs, skills, and other tools. There's much to be done, and tech startups are leading the pack.

(From the latest Techonomy magazine.)   More

Business Security & Privacy Society

Are Connected Toys Worth the Risk?

Children's toys and rooms are quickly becoming connected, like just about everything else. Parents may find monitors useful and talking toys a merciful distraction, but is this new digital world safe? Big companies like Mattel, whose Hello Barbie is illustrated here, may handle the responsibilities, but the raft of startups creeping toward our children's lives may be another matter.   More

Media & Marketing Security & Privacy

Brands, Too, Get Attacked in an Era of Conflict & Terror

Today terrorism is sadly becoming an ongoing challenge. Even as people and communities suffer, brands are also newly challenged. One of the London terrorists wore a jersey from football team Arsenal, which was widely noted in coverage. If we are now in an era of constant conflict, what can companies do to mitigate the risks?   More

From the Magazine Healthcare

Why American Healthcare Is So Hard to Heal

It’s not broken. It’s designed that way. And tech innovators alone can’t fix it.
(from the latest Techonomy magazine)   More

Finance Global Tech

Mobile Design is the Future of Banking

Today, banks must interact with their customers 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Some millennials never even set foot inside a bank branch and only interact with their finances via smartphone. Are new, mobile-only services like Pepper and Nequi the future of banking?   More

Finance Security & Privacy

Talking with Tezos Co-Creator Kathleen Breitman

Kathleen Breitman is person of the hour. Her company developed Tezos, a new blockchain-based cryptocurrency whose ongoing fundraising has raised over $200 million since July 1. We talked to her about why she thinks this is the way to make a better internet, and a better world.   More

Community Insights Healthcare Innovation

How Data Science Can Simplify Healthcare Payments

Medical bills that come long after a doctor's visit can be an unexpected and very unhappy surprise. But part of the reason is an archaic system that medical providers are required to use by the U.S. government. Now, however, there may be a technology solution. Eligible, whose CEO wrote this piece, offers a service to automate calculation of billing and insurance eligibility.   More

Analytics & Data Arts & Culture From the Magazine

R. Luke DuBois: An Artist Who Just Happens to Use Computation

R. Luke DuBois is a man of many talents: musician, visual artist, and data scientist. In a recent interview with Techonomy's David Kirkpatrick, he spoke about his inspirations and gave a behind-the-scenes look at his unique dual video portrait of Google cofounders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. (From the latest issue of Techonomy Magazine)   More

Business From the Magazine

How Customers Pay to Help Big Companies Innovate

Innovating effectively is an urgent imperative for big companies. Now some are working with Indiegogo to crowdfund consumer products that might not have met former thresholds for money and attention. If interest is there, the scale-up happens fast at companies like Whirlpool and GE. (From the latest issue of Techonomy Magazine)   More