From Here to Where? Following the Brain Map

The human brain, a super organ of around 100 billion nerve cells, remains the single most powerful, complex and least understood computer on the planet. Cracking its code will allow us to better utilize our brains, and to drive the creation of better artificial intelligences. The applications span from marketing to medicine and education to warfare. How will how we work, live and play be changed by these new neuro-discoveries? Ed Boyden, associate professor of Biological Engineering and Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the MIT Media Lab and the MIT McGovern Institute, explores the frontier of brain mapping in this talk at the Techonomy 2014 conference in Half Moon Bay, Calif.

The human brain, a super organ of around 100 billion nerve cells, remains the single most powerful, complex and least understood computer on the planet. Cracking its code will allow us to better utilize our brains, and to drive the creation of better artificial intelligences. The applications span from marketing to medicine and education to warfare. How will how we work, live and play be changed by these new neuro-discoveries?

Ed Boyden, associate professor of Biological Engineering and Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the MIT Media Lab and the MIT McGovern Institute, explores the frontier of brain mapping in this talk at the Techonomy 2014 conference in Half Moon Bay, Calif.

For a complete archive of Techonomy 2014 session videos, click here

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