Opinion Society

Why We Need More Techonomics
in 2018

Never in my adult lifetime has there been so much fear about what could go wrong. There are challenges, yes, but we are excited, not daunted by them.   More

Opinion Startup Culture The Internet

Mea Culpas, the Tech Backlash,
and You

The year ended in a flurry of heartfelt mea culpas and welcome I told you so ’s from tech industry veterans, a byproduct of the tech backlash that characterized the second half of 2017.
To which I say, apology accepted.  Now what?   More

Government Opinion Society

We Lost on Net Neutrality. We Have a Bigger Problem.

Concerned about the FCC's net neutrality ruling? Many of the very things neutrality advocates most feared are already happening on Google and Facebook. Where's the activism?   More

Healthcare Opinion

Why Isn’t America’s Healthcare Debate about Health?

Why aren't "reformers" talking about making Americans healthier rather than taking a stilted, partisan approach to "healthcare reform"? Writer Meredith Salisbury says we are not asking some basic questions about U.S. insurance and policy. We've got to start.   More

Opinion

We Should Rename “Artificial Intelligence” (A Modest Proposal)

"Artificial Intelligence" is phrase of the year, yet the term is widely called misleading. And it's ridiculed by industry CEOs. But what can we use instead? "Augmented intelligence"? "Intelligence amplification"? We have a proposal that points beyond flat-footed notions towards the positive future we still believe in.   More

Business Opinion

Zuckerberg is Changing—Can Facebook Catch Up?

Building communities is hard. Mark Zuckerberg now wants Facebook to deliberately do more of it and to "bring the world closer together." But Yatish Rajawat of India's LocalCircles has actually been managing online purpose-based communities, and learned difficult lessons in the process. Is Facebook really ready to follow its leader?   More

Global Tech Internet of Things Opinion

Traversing Europe’s Stellar Tech Firmament

Chief Techonomist David Kirkpatrick was blown away by Europe's energy and tech creativeness on a recent swing, both by how good the conferences were and by the importance of the digital revelations he had. Self-flying cars, anyone?   More

Jobs Opinion

Ladies, Consider a Career in Science

American women have made tremendous strides in science—in some areas they earn half of all doctorate degrees. But women remain at a significant disadvantage to men on a host of metrics, such as likelihood to win federal funding. The perception that science isn’t cool for girls remains rampant in grade schools. But we too often focus only on certain archetypes, when in fact myriad career paths are available. So let's celebrate International Day of Women and Girls in Science, Saturday February 11.   More

Government Opinion Society

Reflections from Ross: How Rough Will it Get?

On the Saturday after the inauguration I saw a ray of light. Was the Women’s March the start of a new movement or the evolution of existing, long-standing movements? I have no idea, but our social fabric is being ripped apart. So now what? We need to get better at listening to those removed from our bubbles. We need to figure out how to ensure the benefits of tech and globalization are more evenly distributed. We need to participate.   More

Opinion The Internet

Your Newsfeed is not “The Internet”

We now have “fake” fake news and “real” fake news… and as of this weekend, “alternative facts.” The World Wide Web of today no longer exhibits the youthful innocence that it once did. Facebook and Twitter are not responsible for sheltering you from false information. You are.   More

Government Opinion Society

The Short-Term Triumph of Short-Termism

Technology is rapidly changing every sector of the economy, as well as the nature of warfare. President-elect Donald Trump doesn't seem to get it. But if you lack a sense of the role of tech, you will only be operating for the short-term.   More

Business Healthcare Opinion Techonomy Events

Techonomy’s Top 5 Articles for 2016

Techonomy's five most-viewed stories included reports about our historic conversation with Mark Zuckerberg, a research psychologist's analysis of why so many White Americans support Trump, a trenchant set of predictions about VR and AR, and two of our many articles on healthcare. One explains why Singapore is becoming a digital health hub, and the other examines the rich potential of data.   More

Media & Marketing Opinion The Internet

Like it or not, the Attention Economy is Adding Emotion

The Attention Economy is becoming the Emotion Economy. Average screen time in the U.S. is almost 11 hours per day. Now tech companies are adding visual and other elements to insert emotion into communication. And virtual reality may take it even further. I only hope it will make us feel good.   More

Global Tech Internet of Things Opinion

Thoughts on the Plane to CES

Every January just after New Year's, as if to force upon recently idle strivers the urgency of redoubling their labors, converge hundreds of thousands of tech-focused leaders, strategists, inventors, financiers, retailers, and journalists. CES is American tech's biggest trade show, fiesta, business meeting, glad-handing exercise, walking course, and source of both elation and frustration. Says Slava Rubin, CEO of Indiegogo, who we ran into at our hotel's check-in: "CES is one giant networking event."   More

Global Tech Opinion

When Moore Is Not Enough – Why Our Growing Networks Require More Software

The demand for communications bandwidth is expanding faster each year. We’re entering a stage where just Moore’s Law and faster and cheaper computing power will simply not be enough. The networks themselves need to become programmable platforms. The infrastructure needs to be as real-time, flexible and dynamic as our smartphones have become. Today software can scale up or down networks to meet user demands.   More

Opinion Society

Unfazedly Optimistic Holiday Greetings!

And so another year ends–with stunning speed and with surprising and slightly disturbing warmth here in New York. Techonomy wishes you happy and merry and a new year of continued optimism, despite the mood of the moment. Here are some thoughts about the kind of world we can collectively create, worth keeping in mind as a new year dawns amidst escalating short-sighted rhetoric and much distraction.   More

Opinion Security & Privacy Society

Are We Ready for Techno-Social Engineering?

Companies like Facebook and Google are developing new technologies to mine our data, to assess who we are and what we want, and – to hear the Internet giants tell it – deliver elegantly tailored experiences that help us better understand and interact with the world around us. David Lazer, an authority on social networks at Northeastern University, refers to it as the rise of the social algorithm and says it's an epic paradigm shift fraught with social and policy implications. Cardozo School of Law’s Brett Frischmann calls it techno-social engineering.   More

Opinion Society

How We Re-Humanized Our Planet (A look back from 2065)

"Towards the end of 2015, our world was in turmoil. Instability, fear, and anxiety dominated the global dialogue," this essay begins. But from there it imagines what that world might look like if all the potential we at Techonomy see in tech were to become realized in the next fifty years. It's an only somewhat whimsical vision, meant to be inspiring and reassuring. It's why we remain resolute optimists.   More

Business Opinion

How to Succeed at Crowdsourcing Innovation

Vigilant business leaders fear becoming irrelevant. We must encourage our employees to want to innovate – not because they are under threat, but because they are eager to be engaged. Much of an organization’s best innovation is driven by ideas that come bottom-up, originating from the grassroots. How can leaders effectively crowdsource innovation?   More

Finance Global Tech Opinion

Big Tech: Better Together or Better Apart? Wall Street Doesn’t Care.

Wall Street fashions come and go. Does a company do better as an ever-accumulating conglomerate or a thinning-down disaggregator of business units? Eager investment bankers, hungry for fees, apply different rationales in different times. Hewlett-Packard and Compaq were better together. Now HPE and HPQ, are better apart. Or so they say. And the transaction occurred, generating vast fees for lawyers, bankers, and consultants. The benefit to shareholders, employees, and customers? Unclear.   More