Cities Media & Marketing Startup Culture

Detroit’s Ambassador Helps Companies Reward Their Advocates

How do companies leverage the communities they build among users, and reward consumers for becoming unofficial ambassadors for their products and services? Detroit native Jeff Epstein asked this question in 2008, just as social media was coming into its own as an empowering platform for consumers. Epstein established Ambassador as a way for companies to give their biggest online evangelists a piece of the action. We spoke with him about harnessing word-of-mouth for a digital marketplace, and on Detroit as startup mecca.   More

Media & Marketing

Armed with Smartphones and Social Media, Brazil’s Mídia Ninja Spreads the News

There’s a new kind of journalism coming from the streets of Rio de Janeiro. The Mídia Ninja is a collective of volunteer citizen journalists who are using smartphones and cameras to record and live-stream street protests in Brazil. And as its influence grows, the ninja is setting the agenda for political discontent, The Guardian reports. The Mídia Ninja has used social media to break news stories on police infiltrations, wrongful arrests, and more. In the past few months it has grown to a group of 2,000 collaborators in 100 cities, and it is beating the mainstream media to important stories.   More

Business Media & Marketing

Potential Google-NFL Deal Means Season Games on YouTube

If reports of a potential Google-NFL deal pan out, come 2015, Sunday Ticket subscribers could be watching season games on YouTube. With DirecTV’s Sunday Ticket rights set to expire at the close of the 2014 season, competitors will soon have the chance to bid on the popular sports content package, putting an apparently interested Google in good position to take control. Speculation of the Sunday Ticket switch-up came after reports of a recent meeting between Google CEO Larry Page, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, and Robert Kyncl, head of content at YouTube.   More

Global Tech Media & Marketing

Meeting in Myanmar? Tech Conferences Are Hot Across Asia

If you’re a regular at the world’s largest and most important technology conferences, you know al lot of them happen in the U.S. But don’t be surprised if you find yourself flying overseas for key conventions in coming years. Across Asia, tech industry pros and enthusiasts are finding increasing value in events that offer great opportunities for inspiration, networking and fun. Like their American counterparts, many of Asia’s conferences are geared toward connecting startups with potential investors, business partners, and mentors. They often follow a formula that includes pitch contests, hackathons, exhibitions, and discussion panels that focus on startup challenges. New events are popping up all the time, but a few major ones dominate the scene.   More

Media & Marketing Opinion

Why Bezos Should Buy the L.A. Times

In the wake of Jeff Bezos’s purchase of The Washington Post, he would do the journalism business a big favor by cutting a similar deal for The Los Angeles Times. And while he's at it, the Amazon multi-billionaire should snap up the seven other newspapers owned by the Times' parent, the Tribune Company. They include The Chicago Tribune, The Baltimore Sun, The Hartford Courant, and The Orlando Sentinel. Since the Tribune Company emerged from bankruptcy last December 31, it has signaled its plans to either spin off or sell the newspaper part of its media empire. Bezos could quickly flesh out his news and information universe.   More

Media & Marketing Opinion

How Much Will Bezos Disrupt the Post?

The best news for the ailing news business in a long time is Jeff Bezos's $250 million purchase of The Washington Post. Those who entertain the knee-jerk reaction that this acquisition of a legacy media operation is simply Bezos laying down dead presidents for “a billionaire's bauble” are sorely mistaken. The news and information economy desperately needs disrupters and innovators of Steve Jobs-like ambitions, and who else but Bezos fits that description? The Amazon founder wouldn't have opened his checkbook if he himself didn't think he was that guy.   More

Media & Marketing

NewsCred’s Credo: Showcase the Best Web Content

NewsCred launched in 2008 with a contrarian business model in digital media that its founder Shafqat Islam admits was “naive”—a plan to spotlight premium journalism. Since then, the plan has matured. Having created powerful curation technology for its partners, NewCred has licensing agreements with hundreds of blue-chip sources, ranging from The New York Times to Getty Images, The Economist, and the Mayo Clinic. With a killer's row of partners, NewsCred is quickly becoming a force in creating custom content in brand marketing for some of the biggest players in the world.   More

Government Media & Marketing

Washington Post Sees the World “Switch”ing

Today the capital's leading media source (yes, still more important than Politico—after all, even people in New York read it) began publishing a regular blog about the intersection of technology and public policy, called (slightly opaquely) The Switch. This is, in our view, just the kind of techonomic movement that the world, and journalism, needs. As its first post explains, the site's goals will be "making the policy process accessible to technologists, while helping policy professionals gain a deeper understanding of technology."   More

Media & Marketing

Why Nate Silver Spurned the Times: Numbers Win

Old-school journalism lost another battle with the numbers-driven ethos of the digital age last week. Statistician extraordinaire Nate Silver's leap from The New York Times to ESPN puts in stark relief the disadvantage blue chip Fourth Estate institutions have competing against an entertainment ethos in the digital age. A David Carr or Andrew Ross Sorkin may be big names, have blog fiefdoms and Twitter followers in the hundreds of thousands, but the mentality of the Times is that the only real star is the Grey Lady itself and that the organization is what keeps those journos in boldface.   More

Media & Marketing

Kirkpatrick: Chromecast Gives Google More Data for Ads

Techonomy’s David Kirkpatrick appeared on Yahoo! Finance on Thursday, calling Chromecast “another major move by the Internet companies that’s going to hurt the old economy of cable systems.” While old systems require viewers to pay ongoing monthly subscriptions, Google Chromecast asks users for a one-time investment of just $35. But what Chromecast consumers aren’t paying for with actual money, they’re paying for with their own information, including what they view and how they view it. This information enables Google to better target its ads and charge buyers more for them.   More

Media & Marketing Security & Privacy

Snowden’s Exploits: Ripped from Prime Time’s “Scandal?”

I wonder if NSA leakmeister Edward Snowden watches the ABC prime-time drama “Scandal?” In particular, I'd be interested to know if he saw the episode entitled “Hunting Season” that originally aired last October, before Snowden went rogue. Why? Because that episode of the show—about the machinations of Olivia Pope, a gorgeous D.C. fixer extraordinaire—featured an NSA analyst who exposes a far-reaching domestic spying operation that permeates even the highest reaches of government.   More

Media & Marketing

With Fan Fiction, Amazon Continues Remaking The Book Business

As an author who is also a digital innovation strategist, and, perhaps most importantly, an avid fan fiction reader, I was intrigued when Amazon announced Kindle Worlds two weeks ago. If you missed the May 22 announcement, Amazon struck a licensing deal with Alloy Entertainment, a subdivision of Warner Brothers that co-produces some of the CW Network’s most popular television shows. Kindle Worlds will let writers create stories about certain shows with the same characters, setting, plot points, and story universe, producing original derivative works of fiction. Forbes’ Jeff Bercovici cleverly calls it, “an API for IP.”   More

Business Media & Marketing

How BuzzFeed Gives Business News Millennial Appeal

A scant month into the launch of BuzzFeed's business section and its editor Peter Lauria is stoked. The news establishment from whence he hails has already taken notice. Out of the gate, The New York Times, the Financial Times, and CNBC, among others, have followed scoops by Lauria and his young team. For example, after news surfaced that Bloomberg reporters were using the financial services giant's terminals to report on clients, BuzzFeed uncovered that higher-ups at the company knew about the unsavory practice for more than a year.   More

Media & Marketing Video

Media Execs on Video: Why Distribution Hasn’t Trumped Content

Techonomy asked Forbes CEO Mike Perlis, Thomson Reuters's ex-CEO Tom Glocer, and Huffington Post CEO Jimmy Maymann: Is content king, or has it been trumped by distribution? In this video, one of them says that if media models don't shift, we could end up in a world of mindless cat videos.   More

Media & Marketing

Spoiler Alert: Mobile Moviegoers Are the Biggest Movie Enthusiasts

Today, with the help of their smartphones and tablets, moviegoers can stay on top of the latest movie trends in real time, purchase tickets on the go and even post their own reviews on social networks before the closing credits roll. Overall, mobile-connected moviegoers are bigger movie enthusiasts than the average U.S. moviegoer, according to Nielsen NRG’s 2012 American Moviegoing report. They spend more, consume more content and are more actively engaged in the moviegoing process. Smartphone and tablet owners are heavier moviegoers than average, attending 9 percent and 20 percent more movies overall in the past year, respectively. In terms of size, 69% of moviegoers own a smartphone and 29% own a tablet, with 23% owning both devices.   More

Media & Marketing

Tapiture Bets Men Will Say, “Hey Dude Check This Out”

Young men are not a priority target for most e-marketers, but Leo and John Resig believe they have created a captive male audience that is eager to spend. The two brothers recently founded Tapiture, a “Pinterest for males,” that has quietly attracted over 1.5 million unique visitors in just a couple of months. Much like Pinterest, Tapiture allows users to browse through a mosaic of photos uploaded by other users and “tap” the ones they like (the equivalent of “pinning”).   More

Media & Marketing Techonomy Events

Tech Trends For Marketers to Watch in 2013

Here are a few top picks for trends and technologies that marketers should be on the lookout for. They’re not the obvious predictions, like using social media to engage external audiences or the growth of mobile apps. Instead, the top trends for marketers to watch in 2013 include an increase in employee engagement, skyrocketing digital couponing, more focus on real-time analytics, and the rise of corporate journalists.   More

Media & Marketing

Facebook Is Making $3 Million a Day on Mobile Ads

Who says Facebook isn’t making any money? On Tuesday afternoon Mark Zuckerberg announced that the company is making $3 million per day in revenue from Facebook’s flagship mobile ad product, Sponsored Stories. Add in the revenue from Sponsored Stories on desktop and the figure rises to $4 million per day.   More

Media & Marketing

Can Facebook Make Mobile Its Gold Mine?

Facebook has "finally gotten religion about the need to really focus on revenue and profit," says Techonomy Founder David Kirkpatrick in a recent interview on Bloomberg TV. Facebook has always focused more on its product and user satisfaction than monetization, but Kirkpatrick thinks it's taken the company too long to recognize that "everything is going mobile." Still, he believes mobile ads will be an effective revenue stream for the company. "Everybody's in the first inning of figuring out mobile advertising," he says. "This is a gold mine, but the problem is you've got to convince consumers that it's OK to get more data about them, because if you do, you can give them information that they perceive as useful."   More