Media & Marketing

Why Nate Silver Spurned the Times: Numbers Win

Old-school journalism lost another battle with the numbers-driven ethos of the digital age last week. Statistician extraordinaire Nate Silver's leap from The New York Times to ESPN puts in stark relief the disadvantage blue chip Fourth Estate institutions have competing against an entertainment ethos in the digital age. A David Carr or Andrew Ross Sorkin may be big names, have blog fiefdoms and Twitter followers in the hundreds of thousands, but the mentality of the Times is that the only real star is the Grey Lady itself and that the organization is what keeps those journos in boldface.   More

Media & Marketing

Kirkpatrick: Chromecast Gives Google More Data for Ads

Techonomy’s David Kirkpatrick appeared on Yahoo! Finance on Thursday, calling Chromecast “another major move by the Internet companies that’s going to hurt the old economy of cable systems.” While old systems require viewers to pay ongoing monthly subscriptions, Google Chromecast asks users for a one-time investment of just $35. But what Chromecast consumers aren’t paying for with actual money, they’re paying for with their own information, including what they view and how they view it. This information enables Google to better target its ads and charge buyers more for them.   More

Media & Marketing Security & Privacy

Snowden’s Exploits: Ripped from Prime Time’s “Scandal?”

I wonder if NSA leakmeister Edward Snowden watches the ABC prime-time drama “Scandal?” In particular, I'd be interested to know if he saw the episode entitled “Hunting Season” that originally aired last October, before Snowden went rogue. Why? Because that episode of the show—about the machinations of Olivia Pope, a gorgeous D.C. fixer extraordinaire—featured an NSA analyst who exposes a far-reaching domestic spying operation that permeates even the highest reaches of government.   More

Media & Marketing

With Fan Fiction, Amazon Continues Remaking The Book Business

As an author who is also a digital innovation strategist, and, perhaps most importantly, an avid fan fiction reader, I was intrigued when Amazon announced Kindle Worlds two weeks ago. If you missed the May 22 announcement, Amazon struck a licensing deal with Alloy Entertainment, a subdivision of Warner Brothers that co-produces some of the CW Network’s most popular television shows. Kindle Worlds will let writers create stories about certain shows with the same characters, setting, plot points, and story universe, producing original derivative works of fiction. Forbes’ Jeff Bercovici cleverly calls it, “an API for IP.”   More

Business Media & Marketing

How BuzzFeed Gives Business News Millennial Appeal

A scant month into the launch of BuzzFeed's business section and its editor Peter Lauria is stoked. The news establishment from whence he hails has already taken notice. Out of the gate, The New York Times, the Financial Times, and CNBC, among others, have followed scoops by Lauria and his young team. For example, after news surfaced that Bloomberg reporters were using the financial services giant's terminals to report on clients, BuzzFeed uncovered that higher-ups at the company knew about the unsavory practice for more than a year.   More

Media & Marketing Video

Media Execs on Video: Why Distribution Hasn’t Trumped Content

Techonomy asked Forbes CEO Mike Perlis, Thomson Reuters's ex-CEO Tom Glocer, and Huffington Post CEO Jimmy Maymann: Is content king, or has it been trumped by distribution? In this video, one of them says that if media models don't shift, we could end up in a world of mindless cat videos.   More

Media & Marketing

Spoiler Alert: Mobile Moviegoers Are the Biggest Movie Enthusiasts

Today, with the help of their smartphones and tablets, moviegoers can stay on top of the latest movie trends in real time, purchase tickets on the go and even post their own reviews on social networks before the closing credits roll. Overall, mobile-connected moviegoers are bigger movie enthusiasts than the average U.S. moviegoer, according to Nielsen NRG’s 2012 American Moviegoing report. They spend more, consume more content and are more actively engaged in the moviegoing process. Smartphone and tablet owners are heavier moviegoers than average, attending 9 percent and 20 percent more movies overall in the past year, respectively. In terms of size, 69% of moviegoers own a smartphone and 29% own a tablet, with 23% owning both devices.   More

Media & Marketing

Tapiture Bets Men Will Say, “Hey Dude Check This Out”

Young men are not a priority target for most e-marketers, but Leo and John Resig believe they have created a captive male audience that is eager to spend. The two brothers recently founded Tapiture, a “Pinterest for males,” that has quietly attracted over 1.5 million unique visitors in just a couple of months. Much like Pinterest, Tapiture allows users to browse through a mosaic of photos uploaded by other users and “tap” the ones they like (the equivalent of “pinning”).   More

Media & Marketing Techonomy Events

Tech Trends For Marketers to Watch in 2013

Here are a few top picks for trends and technologies that marketers should be on the lookout for. They’re not the obvious predictions, like using social media to engage external audiences or the growth of mobile apps. Instead, the top trends for marketers to watch in 2013 include an increase in employee engagement, skyrocketing digital couponing, more focus on real-time analytics, and the rise of corporate journalists.   More

Media & Marketing

Facebook Is Making $3 Million a Day on Mobile Ads

Who says Facebook isn’t making any money? On Tuesday afternoon Mark Zuckerberg announced that the company is making $3 million per day in revenue from Facebook’s flagship mobile ad product, Sponsored Stories. Add in the revenue from Sponsored Stories on desktop and the figure rises to $4 million per day.   More

Media & Marketing

Can Facebook Make Mobile Its Gold Mine?

Facebook has "finally gotten religion about the need to really focus on revenue and profit," says Techonomy Founder David Kirkpatrick in a recent interview on Bloomberg TV. Facebook has always focused more on its product and user satisfaction than monetization, but Kirkpatrick thinks it's taken the company too long to recognize that "everything is going mobile." Still, he believes mobile ads will be an effective revenue stream for the company. "Everybody's in the first inning of figuring out mobile advertising," he says. "This is a gold mine, but the problem is you've got to convince consumers that it's OK to get more data about them, because if you do, you can give them information that they perceive as useful."   More

Business Media & Marketing

The Internet’s Most Powerful Business Journalist: Dan Roth of LinkedIn

Forget the Wall Street Journal or The Economist—according to Business Insider, the most powerful business journalist on the Internet is Dan Roth, the executive editor of LinkedIn. Roth oversees and aggregates LinkedIn Today, which brings top headlines to the site's 175 million-plus members.   More

Media & Marketing

Real or Rendered? How 3D Imagery Is Changing the Way You Shop

The next time you shop for a vehicle, flip through a furniture catalog, or look at clothing online, the images you see may not be photography, but rather a collection of pixels assembled by an artist on a computer screen.   More

Media & Marketing

Deciphering Facebook’s Ad Exchange

Facebook is still formulating ways to leverage its massive user base (which just surpassed one billion) to create new models for ad revenue. The launch this summer of its own ad exchange was a step in that direction, albeit one that draws on precedents established by Web publishers like Yahoo and AOL. How does the Exchange actually work? Peter Kafka of AllThingsD asked Triggit CEO Zach Coelius to lay out the basics. Judge for yourself how successful he is in translating ad-tech speak into plain English.   More

Media & Marketing

Putting A Human Face on Big Data

Big Data is a hard concept to grasp because it applies to so many things in our digital world: the exabytes of information produced every year, the digital exhaust of a billion cell phones, the GPS coordinates tracking everything from trucks and trains to the migratory patterns of ocean life, the inventory data spewed by RFID tags, the measurement of our quantified selves through apps and devices that can track every footfall. Rick Smolan, the photographer and mass media coordinator who brought us the Day in the Life books, is embarking on one of his biggest projects yet: The Human Face of Big Data. Smolan sent a hundred photographers around the world to make sense of big data and capture the human side of the equation. In the video above he explains the project and takes a stab at defining big data.   More

Business Media & Marketing

Entertainment Heavies Rudin and Diller Jump into Book Publishing

Two entertainment moguls are braving the e-book publishing business with the launch of Brightline, a venture created in partnership with Brooklyn-based publishing start-up Atavist. Brightline will publish e-books and eventually paper books. With powerful founders—Scott Rudin, a film and theater producer, and Barry Diller, chairman of InterActiveCorp—the company could bring some competition to the dynamic digital publishing industry, in which Amazon controls 65 percent of e-book sales.   More

Business Media & Marketing Techonomy Events

Sprint’s Dan Hesse on Giving His Company a Public Face

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Dan Hesse, CEO of Sprint Nextel Corporation, explains how endowing a company with a distinct personality, and literally giving it a human face, can be a powerful business decision. A 2008 ad campaign that featured Hesse as a spokesperson for Sprint on television helped improve the company's reputation.   More

Media & Marketing Techonomy Events Video

McKinsey’s Bertil Chappuis Maps Five Trends in Mobile, Social, and Video

In this 10-minute talk from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Bertil Chappuis, Senior Partner at McKinsey & Company Inc., outlines five US trends in mobile, social media, video, and communication that were identified by iConsumer, the company's consumer insight asset.   More

Business Media & Marketing Techonomy Events

Sprint’s Dan Hesse on Why Consumers Still Don’t Dictate Product Development

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Dan Hesse, CEO of Sprint Nextel Corporation, argues that even though consumers now play a big roll in improving customer service via social networks, they still don't dictate new product development.   More