Government Learning Manufacturing

Defense Department Funds High School “Hackerspaces”

A new $10 million federal program is bringing “hackerspaces” to high schools, the New York Times reports. Hackerspaces are community groups for hackers to build and invent technology (and take things apart). They are considered incubators for innovation and a major part of the DIY movement—but the high school program has sparked some controversy.   More

Government Manufacturing Security & Privacy

A Gun Made from a 3D Printer? Techno-Challenges Grow More Complex

At Techonomy we believe that just about literally everything is being transformed by technology, especially Internet technology, and we also are quite psyched about 3D printing. It's another example of the empowerment of individuals—in the potent tradition of the PC, Web browser, Facebook, etc. But now guns are beginning to be made with 3D printers. There is likely nothing that can be done to stop that. It underscores another fundamental Techonomy point—that all of us, as citizens, leaders, and human beings—need to be thinking harder about what technology is doing to the world in which we live. Disruption is right.   More

Business Government Manufacturing

Why the Candidates Need to Tout a Digital Economy

The U.S. could be poised to emerge as a leader in a new global digital economy. But Zoe Baird, President of the Markle Foundation, believes that the presidential candidates must do more to articulate a vision of what a tech and data-driven economy will look like.   More

Business Government

Abolish Patents to Spark Innovation, Fed Paper Urges

Researchers at the US Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis say that the patent system should be abolished, SmartPlanet reports. Innovation will come from a patentless, cooperative environment in which technologies and discoveries are shared.   More

Government Security & Privacy

Obama Campaign Uses Big Data to Target Voters Block by Block

As reported by Richard McGregor in the Financial Times, one voter whose name, age, and address were published in the "Obama for America" app, which helps canvassers target doors to knock on, was decidedly nonplussed about having his personal information downloadable by anyone with a smartphone. "Everything is an invasion of privacy these days," he said. "If I got excited about it, I would have had a coronary by now." Others are less sanguine about the ways the Obama campaign is using technology, and data culled from social media, to micro-target voters. But both campaigns have tools that tell them a lot more about voters than their ages and addresses, and they're using them to "slice and dice" the voting population in a way Barack Obama could have never envisioned when he gave his seminal 2004 convention speech.   More

Government Partner Insights

2012 – The Social Media Election

After it was over, the 2008 U.S. presidential election came to be known as "the social media election"—a nod to the Obama team's tech-savvy use of the Internet to raise money and build its grassroots network. But today, with the current presidential election campaigns going into overdrive, few would dispute that 2012 is the year social media in politics has truly come of age.   More

Government

Can Twitter Hold Out as Defender of Free Speech?

Twitter's chief lawyer, Alexander Macgillivray, believes that defending free speech is smart business. The company has been tenacious in its efforts to keep governments' prying eyes away from its users' content, and is still resisting a Manhattan court order to turn over the account activity of an Occupy protestor. "We value the reputation we have for defending and respecting the users' voice," says Macgillivray. But Twitter may soon face pressures, both financial and regulatory, that render such customer-facing idealism inoperable. Industry observers wonder how the company will navigate corporate responsibility in an Internet era.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Jared Cohen of Google Ideas on How a Mobile Video Changed American Foreign Policy

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Jared Cohen, Director of Google Ideas, talks about how the video of Neda Soltan's murder, captured on a mobile phone, changed American foreign policy in a matter of hours. Without empowerment technology, he says, the seriousness and immediacy of what was happening during the Iranian uprising in 2009 would likely have gone unnoticed by foreign leaders.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Microsoft’s Craig Mundie on Changing Governance in Response to Technological Change

In the "Government in an Integrated World" session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Craig Mundie, Chief Research and Strategy Officer at Microsoft, discusses how he thinks governance will have to change to accommodate rapid technological and social change. The world is now so interdependent, he says, that a 'sick' country is felt by the rest of the world.   More

Business Government

To Build America’s Future, Compete Aggressively for Investment

Here’s a chicken and egg problem. Are companies failing to invest in the United States because of its decaying infrastructure, schools that don’t produce enough skilled workers, and a byzantine immigration system? Or has the reluctance of companies to invest in the United States led to decaying infrastructure, failing education, and growing political fights over immigration?   More

Government

Social Media Fuels Hopes for Civil Society in Russia

So what’s Europe’s largest Internet economy: Germany? The United Kingdom? France? Since last year, Russia is top of the heap—at least in terms of users, according to Internet metrics experts ComScore. More important, Russia’s online market is still growing rapidly, its social media scene is vibrant—and the big players are all homegrown.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Steve Forbes: Trashing the Dollar Will Never Save the US Economy

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Steve Forbes, Chairman and Editor-in-Chief of Forbes Media, highlights why he thinks trashing the dollar will never stabilize the US economy.   More

Business Government

Why Techonomy?: A Manifesto

We believe in the potential of technology to make the world a happier, healthier, wealthier, and more peaceful place. Techonomy's name embodies our beliefs and our mission—it combines the words "technology" and "economy" because technology has become a central part of the economy in which we operate and the society in which we live. Today technology is inextricably entwined with just about every activity that humans undertake. We embrace that fact, and seek as a company to help the world take advantage of it.   More

Business Government

Technology Transforms Lives

Techonomy founder David Kirkpatrick, author of The Facebook Effect, talks about how the rapid acceleration of technology impacts business and social change.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Jim Breyer of Accel Partners on Tech and Direct Democracy

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Jim Breyer, Partner at Accel Partners, argues that technology is fueling a new type of direct democracy. He cites the city of Rio De Janeiro as an example of how a local government has used technology to make life safer for its citizens.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Sean Parker on Platforms for Individual Empowerment

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Sean Parker, Managing Partner of Founders Fund, discusses Votizen and Causes, two companies helping to empower the individuals in the political sphere.   More

Business Government

How to Be an Optimist in a Pessimistic Time

It's no secret that technology is changing the world. Unfortunately, there are a surprising number of people who don't get it. Many of them, even more unfortunately, are important leaders in business, other powerful instutitions, and governments. To meet the challenges that face us—whether as leaders of organizations, as leaders of countries, or as the global community addressing our collective challenge—we will only be successful if we unreservedly embrace technology and innovation as essential tools.   More

Business Government Techonomy Events

Steve Forbes on Monetary Policy, Healthcare, and Education

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Steve Forbes, Chairman and Editor-in-Chief of Forbes Media, says reforming monetary policy, healthcare, and education will dramatically improve the US economy.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Jared Cohen of Google Ideas on How Egyptians Networked Their Revolution

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Jared Cohen, Director of Google Ideas, discusses how Egyptians used the Internet to advertise and broadcast their revolution, and how it affected the outcome of the uprising. Had Mubarak not shut down the Internet and mobile service networks during the uprising, says Cohen, he might have had a better chance of staying in power.   More

Government Techonomy Events

ITU President Hamadoun Touré on Internet Access as a Human Right

In this video from Techonomy 2011 in Tucson, Ariz., Forbes editor Randall Lane talks to Hamadoun Touré, Secretary General of the International Telecommuniation Union, about why it was important for the Union to establish access to broadband Internet as an international human right. Touré addresses whether the use of social media as a tool for political engagement, and resistance, will make it increasingly difficult to enforce such rights.   More