Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results for “United Nations”

Community Insights Healthcare

Why Tuberculosis Persists

Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the great scourges. Amazingly, one of every three people in the world is infected. Why it persists: political leaders do not understand its sociology; scientists lack effective paradigms to attack it; and the rich and famous no longer die from it. We need fewer excuses and more action.   More

Global Tech Techonomy Events

Data and Crisis: The Information Revolution in Humanitarian Response

Almost nothing makes gathering robust information harder than a natural disaster. But new services and infrastructure emerging globally promise to revolutionize humanitarian response. The edge of the network is alive with open-source technologies, open data, mobile and social computing, cloud services, open GIS, microblogging, sensing, homemade unmanned aerial vehicles, open analytics, and visualization. These will all contribute to a revolution in humanitarian and development affairs over the next 10-15 years.   More

Global Tech

United Nations Spearheads Big Data for Development

When we think of Big Data, humanitarian aid and international development are probably not what first come to mind. But a United Nations team called Global Pulse is working to connect the dots between data mining and humanitarianism, showing us how we can use Big Data to digitally map the global development ecosystem. “Big Data for development” works by analyzing data from cell phones, social networking sites, and Internet commerce to locate clues about signs of distress in developing countries.   More

Government Techonomy Events

ITU President Hamadoun Touré on Internet Access as a Human Right

In this video from Techonomy 2011 in Tucson, Ariz., Forbes editor Randall Lane talks to Hamadoun Touré, Secretary General of the International Telecommuniation Union, about why it was important for the Union to establish access to broadband Internet as an international human right. Touré addresses whether the use of social media as a tool for political engagement, and resistance, will make it increasingly difficult to enforce such rights.   More