Tag Index  /  Showing 41 - 60 of 70 results for “Techonomy Detroit”

Energy & Green Tech Manufacturing

Remaking Detroit Is More Than the Sum of Its Parts: A Car Guy’s View

As a consumer, it is easy to take for granted the innovation needed to create automobiles that are more appealing, leave a smaller environmental footprint, and are manufactured more efficiently. But for industry insiders immersed in the operations of delivering products, it is easy to miss the forest for the trees. By a quirk of fate, having moved from the Silicon Valley to work in Dearborn 17 years ago, I wear a lens of both an outsider and an insider that offers me a unique vantage point on the remaking of Detroit: I can see how the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.   More

Startup Culture

Detroit’s Doodle Home: A Platform for All Things Design

After taking a break from her interior design career to raise a family, Jennifer Gilbert says she wanted to “get creative” again. But she quickly realized how interior design and luxury home furnishings had stagnated during her years away. She saw the inefficient, fragmented industries as being ripe for change. “I figured if someone was going to change it, why not me?” she says. Having witnessed what her husband, Quicken Loans founder and chairman Dan Gilbert, had done to bring the mortgage business online, she resolved to bring the same efficiencies to her profession.   More

Business Partner Insights

Five Game-Changers To Reignite U.S. Growth

The US economy is struggling to find a new formula for vigorous growth. But all growth opportunities are not created equal. New McKinsey research pinpoints five catalysts—in energy, trade, technology, infrastructure, and talent development—that can quickly create jobs and deliver a substantial boost to GDP by 2020. An animated video below also runs the numbers on these game changers and frames the challenge for business and government to make the most of the opportunity.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Navigating Detroit: A VFA Fellow Discovers Ideas, Energy, Opportunity

Kathy Cheng is used to walkable cities. She grew up near New York and went to college in Cambridge, Mass. Now she finds herself driving in the Motor City, as a Venture for America (VFA) fellow working at a startup in downtown Detroit. Cheng talked to Techonomy about the VFA program, adapting to Detroit, and helping the city thrive.   More

Startup Culture

Putting Young Tech Minds and Friendly Faces on Debt Collection

After Detroit’s bankruptcy filing, there might not be a more apropos startup in Michigan than HealPay, an Ann Arbor company that offers a suite of cloud-based apps that enable online payment processing for various sectors. As HealPay co-founder Erick Bzovi says, debt collection “is a dirty world and the technology sucks.” The solutions he and cofounder Lance Carlson have developed streamline collections and provide electronic options that they say improve chances of collecting receivables.   More

Cities Media & Marketing Startup Culture

Detroit’s Ambassador Helps Companies Reward Their Advocates

How do companies leverage the communities they build among users, and reward consumers for becoming unofficial ambassadors for their products and services? Detroit native Jeff Epstein asked this question in 2008, just as social media was coming into its own as an empowering platform for consumers. Epstein established Ambassador as a way for companies to give their biggest online evangelists a piece of the action. We spoke with him about harnessing word-of-mouth for a digital marketplace, and on Detroit as startup mecca.   More

Business Internet of Things

Are We There Yet? Delivering a Contextually Aware Networked Vehicle

Businesses and consumers are embracing a mobile experience for entertainment and information nearly everywhere, from devices and applications to the connected home to social networks. Yet there is a last bastion of hold-outs in our increasingly “always on” mobile lifestyle—our cars. Though roadblocks exist, the car’s time has come. Both the mobile and automotive industries have finally reached a critical, defining moment to create and deliver an unprecedented mobile platform: the networked vehicle.   More

Cities

Detroit Is No Blank Canvas: Why Creativity Pays Here

"Detroit is a blank canvas." I cringe every time I hear this phrase, even though it's used by people who mean well. To say something that references "emptiness" regarding a city founded in 1701 is both unfair and inaccurate, as it implies that there's nothing here—or worse—that there's nothing worth talking about here. By suggesting this, the speaker disregards momentum building around the Detroit 2.0 movement, which is in full swing.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Why a Recruiting Startup Thrives in Detroit

With backing from Detroit Venture Partners, Matt Mosher founded hiredMYway.com in 2010. In the crowded field of online recruiting, it might have seemed an unlikely-to-succeed upstart. But as an entrepreneur since his early teens, Mosher knew how to take a fresh approach in order to coexist with the biggest names in the industry. With Detroiter moxie, he built the Swiss Army knife of recruiting sites.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Detroit Startup Wants the World to Get Glocal

Launched in 2011, Detroit's Glocal offers users a tailored local experience via online community forums. It aims to counter a loss of connection with local community that many see as a negative effect of the global hyper-connectedness driven by social media. Techonomy spoke with Glocal President Lincoln Cavalieri about the importance of zooming in on what’s happening in your own neck of the woods.   More

Cities

Why Detroit Is Fertile Ground for an Innovation District

With 90-percent occupancy rates, 10,000 new jobs, a brand new Whole Foods, and the repurposing of a long-abandoned GM building as a design center, midtown-downtown Detroit—soon to be linked by a new rail line—is poised to become the country’s next "innovation district," suggest Brookings Institution's Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley in The New Republic this week.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Detroit’s Workfolio Helps Anyone Build Their Own Personal Website

Workfolio was founded in Detroit, but today also operates out of New York. The company aims to make creating online professional profile websites intuitive for everyone in the working world. Techonomy spoke with Workfolio Founder and CEO Charles Pooley about personal branding, how he got into DIY Web design, and what sets Detroit apart from other cities.   More

Cities

Why One Ad Agency Is Moving to Detroit, and Thinks You Should, Too

Skeptics who have long since given up on Detroit dismiss the city as dilapidated, deserted, desperate. Not so, argue some of the country’s leading innovators, who instead see a city brimming with creativity, community, and opportunity for change. Detroit may be bankrupt, they say, but that’s not stopping them from moving there—to be a part of the change that’s unfolding and on the front lines of the renaissance to come. Among those innovators heading to Detroit is ad agency Lowe Campbell Ewald, which recently produced a short video heralding their move. Since it was posted on July 26, the video has garnered more than 34,000 hits on YouTube.   More

Cities

Tech and Innovation Must Play Central Role in Detroit Revival

Even as Detroit hits financial bottom, Techonomy retains its belief that applying tech and innovation can be a major aid toward a historic comeback. As Techonomy Detroit 2013 nears, the conference continues to grow its list of speakers and sponsors, and refine its program. Techonomy earlier announced the inclusion of Square CEO Jack Dorsey, Etsy CEO Chad Dickerson, Jean Case of the Case Foundation, Andrew Yang of Venture for America, and Michigan Governor Rick Snyder. New speakers include Rodney Brooks of Rethink Robotics, Bruce Katz of the Brookings Institution, Edward Luce of the Financial Times, Susan Lund of the McKinsey Global Institute, Hector Ruiz, Chairman and Founder of ANS, Nilmini Rubin, competitiveness expert for the Foreign Affairs Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives, Ford's K. Venkatesh Prasad, and Cisco’s Senior Vice President of Corporate Affairs, Tae Yoo.   More

Cities

A Development Guru’s New Take on Detroit: Optimism

Detroit's emerging startup scene is enough to make even an economic development guru pivot his position on the city's future. New Republic's Alec MacGillis, who's been watching the gurus closely, prefers the term "flip-flop" for Richard Florida's readjustment. Florida, a University of Toronto professor, Atlantic senior editor, and author of "Rise of the Creative Class," has been opining for years about Detroit's circumstances. Last week, Florida told CNN that anyone who's been paying attention to Detroit wasn't surprised by the bankruptcy filing. But he said it hit right when the city is finally ready to make a comeback.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Why I Love Detroit for Launching a Startup

By the time my company LevelEleven launched last fall after being incubated within Pleasant Ridge’s ePrize, I had already planned our business strategy and next steps. And it never crossed my mind to move out of Detroit to build LevelEleven in a more obvious startup market. Why? In part, because this is home. But Detroit also has many characteristics that make it a great place to launch a technology startup. There’s a lot of noise about entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley and New York. But listen closely and you can hear a new buzz coming out of the Motor City.   More

Startup Culture

A Talent Transfusion for Scrappy Startup Hubs

Maybe Millennials aren't as selfish as people think. Some college grads are turning down high salaries in finance and consulting for entry level positions at startups in cities like Detroit, New Orleans, and Baltimore—where they can have an impact on the community while also learning important entrepreneurial skills. They are doing so with the help of Venture for America, a nonprofit that matches highly talented graduates with startup businesses in cities that need an economic boost, The New York Times reports. Founder Andrew Yang says that the program aims to improve talent allocation among bright college graduates. “Promising growth companies, companies that are five years old or less, are the consistent engine of job creation in this country,” he told Techonomy in an interview last fall.   More

Cities

Rising Costs: Is Uber’s Market-Demand Pricing Ethical?

As San Francisco's recent transit strike winds down, contract negotiations will carry on over the next month between Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) and the employee unions. For on-demand car services such as Uber, who have gained a significant foothold in the Bay Area, strikes of this nature present a unique opportunity to capitalize on the increased demand for affordable transit. With approximately 400,000 people using the service on a daily basis, the economic impact of a transit strike within the city is significant. Yet Uber's business practices of engaging in a market-demand pricing strategy could, by their own admission, result in "surge pricing"—a premium price placed on rides during high-demand periods.   More

Cities

Techonomy and Jack Dorsey Return to Detroit

Techonomy Media proudly announces it is bringing its one-day public conference, Techonomy Detroit, back for a second straight year. A diverse group of business, tech, government, and policy leaders will join in a spirited discussion of how technology is changing everything for the United States and its cities. National and local leaders will converge at Wayne State University on September 17, 2013 for a series of conversations and workshops to focus on the challenges and opportunities posed by headlong tech-driven change.   More

Cities Manufacturing

Chinese Companies Set Up Shop in the Motor City

A new wave of investment is happening in long-suffering Detroit. At first blush, that sounds eminently promising—the region, and the U.S. auto industry, is still rebounding from the recession, with mixed results. But the who and why paint a more complex picture. As part of their steady push into the U.S. auto industry, “Chinese-owned companies are investing in American businesses and new vehicle technology, selling everything from seat belts to shock absorbers in retail stores, and hiring experienced engineers and designers in an effort to soak up the talent and expertise of domestic automakers and their suppliers,” Bill Vlasic writes in The New York Times.   More