Tag Index  /  Showing 21 - 40 of 70 results for “Techonomy Detroit”

Cities Startup Culture

How Detroit Turned Me into a Coder and Entrepreneur

There are three things happening in my life right now that, frankly, would have shocked the college-aged Kate Catlin: I live in Detroit; I’m being trained as a coder; and I’m starting a tech company. All through college I was a gregarious environmental activist living in Washington State and happily climbing mountains every weekend. I dreamed of traveling abroad and leading political campaigns, or maybe a “social enterprise” like TOMS shoes. It almost gives me whiplash to look around now and ask, “What just happened?”   More

Media & Marketing

Detroit’s Stik Helps Companies Find Their Biggest Advocates

When we have important “life administration” decisions to make—getting a loan or a new health insurance plan—we often turn to people we know and trust. A Detroit startup called Stik is asking, “What if businesses could use the Internet to better harness the power of recommendations and benefit from the emerging ‘reputation economy?’” Stik’s end-to-end solution helps businesses grow through referrals, and lets consumers discover businesses they can trust using a new form of social advertising.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Hooked on Company-Building and Community in Detroit

Entering my senior year of college after a summer working at an investment bank, I had decided that I wanted to be an entrepreneur. As I began thinking about how to become an entrepreneur, however, I was faced with the reality that I didn’t have an idea to launch straight out of college, and even if I did, I had no idea how to go about starting a company. I was an aspiring entrepreneur without experience, mentorship, or an idea. I had a problem. Then I heard about Venture for America, and it was the perfect solution to my problem.   More

Techonomy Events

Techonomy Taps Detroit’s Magic on Sept. 16

When Techonomy's Chief Program Director Simone Ross first proposed in late 2011 that we consider doing an entire conference in Detroit, I was a little confused. Detroit? Isn't Techonomy all about cutting edge, shiny, new, transformative technologies and the things being transformed? Why head to America's most distressed big city? But Simone convinced me to head there with her before Christmas that year and I, like her, became captivated. Techonomy is back in Detroit for our third annual Techonomy Detroit conference on Tuesday, September 16, because it turns out to be the perfect place for a "techonomic" discussion about a number of trends everybody needs to understand better.   More

Analytics & Data Cities

Wisely Harnesses Spending for a Local Business Guide

Like most people, you probably read online product and service reviews with a healthy grain of salt. But if users doubt the credibility of online recommendations, how can sites that curate them earn consumers’ trust and loyalty? Michigan-based Wisely set out to do precisely that when it created a new kind of local discovery app that gathers real transaction data from customers, such as how much they spend at a restaurant, instead of subjective information like customer reviews. We spoke with Wisely co-founder and CEO Mike Vichich about what Wisely does for small businesses, and why building an “awesome” Michigan starts in Detroit.   More

Finance

Benzinga: The Detroit-based Online Investing Tool for Average Joes

When Jason Raznick set out to create an online financial service to help the average investor, he didn’t gravitate to New York City’s center of global finance. He launched it from his basement in Birmingham, Michigan. Recognizing the need for a service that delivers quality investment information to people who don’t have a Wall Streeter’s access to real-time data, he figured his hometown was as good a place as any to get started. Now operating in Detroit, Benzinga continues to grow its audience as the rise of community-based, social investing continues to transform the industry.   More

Analytics & Data Cities

“Blexts” Enable a Quantified Blight Movement in Detroit

When Dan Gilbert told the Techonomy Detroit audience last September that the wrecking ball was the next step to reviving the Motor City, we quipped that demolition didn't seem like such a techonomic concept. It turns out technology will even expedite the process of razing some 80,000 dilapidated buildings. NPR reports this week that an army of "blexters," enabled by tablet computers and "blight texting" tools, is creating digital maps and a database of every structure across Detroit's 139 square miles.   More

Jobs

McKinsey’s Susan Lund on Tomorrow’s Workforce

At our recent Techonomy Detroit conference, McKinsey Global Institute director of research Susan Lund shared a worrisome statistic: today four out of five U.S. college graduates can't find work in their field of study. So how can we get more graduating students into the workforce? According to Lund, we need a radical rethink of American education. "The basic way we educate kids hasn't really changed in a hundred years," Lund said. "And what's needed today are workers of all different sorts, but with more skills."   More

Manufacturing

Etsy CEO Chad Dickerson on Maker Culture

Etsy represents a new way of connecting handcraft makers to buyers, but it's rooted in an age-old tradition. As Etsy CEO Chad Dickerson put it, "We represent something really fundamental about humanity: the making of things." At our Techonomy Detroit conference, Dickerson explained what draws people into the maker movement, and how it's going global.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Venture for America’s Yang Calls Detroit an Innovation Hub

Winning innovators don’t depend on the market for opportunities; they innovate their way into them. So says Venture for America founder Andrew Yang, who talked with us at our Techonomy Detroit conference about the need for more innovation and why Detroit can help spark it. “We need to get more smart people building things. We need to get more of our talented working to solve the problems of the day,” he said, adding that Detroit's access to talent, resources, and customers to put it at the forefront of tech entrepreneurship in coming years.   More

Business

How Detroit Can Compete Globally

If you ask Michael A. Finney if Detroit is going to become a tech hub, he'll tell you to look around—Detroit already is a tech hub. "Detroit is loaded with technology," the Michigan Economic Development Corporation CEO said. Finney, appointed by Michigan's Governor Rick Snyder, talked with us at our recent Techonomy Detroit conference about Detroit's talent-driven infrastructure, from community and business leaders to universities, companies, and the auto industry. "It's a question of building on all the great strengths we have right now in the auto sector and extending it into other sectors," Finney said, calling Detroit "an ideal location for future development."   More

Manufacturing

Rodney Brooks on Cars as Robots

How many people have operated their own robot? A lot more than you might think, Rethink Robotics founder and CTO Rodney Brooks would say. "I tell everyone, 'You're driving around inside a robot, and 10 years from now it's going to become an even smarter robot,'" Brooks told us at our Techonomy Detroit conference. "Cars are the epicenter, actually, of robotics." Brooks also elaborated on how easy-to-use robots are in a position to transform the manufacturing industry, making it more efficient, more localized, and less generic--a potential boon for cities like Detroit.   More

E-Commerce

Etsy CEO Chad Dickerson: My Favorite Etsy Purchase

At our recent Techonomy Detroit conference, we presented Etsy CEO Chad Dickerson with a tough question: What was his own favorite Etsy purchase? The head of the Brooklyn-based handcraft e-marketplace struggled to narrow down his top buys to just one favorite, quipping "It's like children. Which one is your favorite child?" So what item did Dickerson end up picking? Hint: It saw its beginnings as a leather jacket, an army tent, and an army kit bag.   More

Cities

Etsy CEO Chad Dickerson on the Next Wave of Tech Hubs

Does adding "Silicon" before a community's name make it a better place for tech? Etsy CEO Chad Dickerson would answer with a resounding "No," saying the practice is one of his personal pet peeves. Dickerson talked at Techonomy Detroit about how cities like Detroit can remain authentic by embracing their unique identities. "Every city should try to be itself," he said, noting that part of Detroit's heritage is its long history of innovation and making things. "Detroit has that maker culture really baked into the city."   More

Business Cities

This Native Detroiter Feels the Pull of Home

In the days since Techonomy Detroit, I'm more hopeful about my hometown than I have been since I left for New York to go to Columbia University 30 years ago. Yet before I headed to the conference, when I joked with media and tech pals that I was on my way to “the Paris of Southeastern Michigan,” I’d get a laugh or a look of grave concern. In their eyes, a place I love was a disaster zone, a dear family member on the critical list.   More

Manufacturing

How the Maker Movement Is Reinventing Retail

The jury is still out on whether the maker movement could bring about a new American industrial revolution. But anecdotal evidence suggests it is well on its way to reinventing retail. Etsy CEO Chad Dickerson and Shapeways co-founder Marleen Vogelaar joined Detroit Creative Corridor Center director Matt Clayson and Ford’s open innovation guru K. Venkatesh Prasad for a “maker movement” discussion moderated by McKinsey & Company principal Lou Rassey at the Techonomy Detroit conference.   More

Cities Government

Next Step To a Techonomic Detroit? The Wrecking Ball

Demolition isn’t exactly a techonomic concept, but clearing Detroit of tens of thousands of burned-out houses and crumbling factories is a crucial next-step in urban renewal here, according to Dan Gilbert. In fact, he’d like to see a digital billboard count down the progress to the last razed building. Efforts to improve education, support entrepreneurship, and boost Detroit's cultural hub won’t mean much to locals until the blight is cleared, Gilbert argued. “If we get these structures down, all of them, we’ll be amazed at how quickly this land gets redeveloped," he said.   More

Business Techonomy Events

Techonomy Detroit 2013 Webcast

We just wrapped up Techonomy Detroit 2013, but you can watch the entire conference, start-to-finish, right here. Techonomy Detroit is a series of conversations and workshops we began last year at our first Detroit conference. Our urgent theme is the role of technology and innovation in boosting American economic growth, job creation, and urban revival. The all-day Techonomy Detroit focuses on issues that form the foundation of the urban century, with technology at the core of the conversation. We see it as the central source of both disruption and opportunity. Join our live webcast of Techonomy Detroit, Tuesday, Sept. 17, from 8:30am through 5:45pm.   More

Cities

To Revive Detroit, Revive Its Core

It may seem early to talk about Detroit’s rebound, with the city’s recent bankruptcy filing on July 18th, but the fact is this city is ripe for renewal. Its much-needed fiscal reset provides an opportunity to return to a real growth strategy, one that can serve as an example of how to bring any city back from the brink. This renewal is already blossoming in Detroit’s core—a 4.3 square mile section of the city that bridges Downtown and Midtown, encompassing just 3.1 percent of the city’s landmass, but with 36 percent of its jobs. In this core, employment grew by over 4 percent between 2009 and 2011, while the city as a whole saw jobs decrease nearly 6 percent.   More

Cities

With Philanthropy and Business the Coaches, Motor City Aims to Play Again

In our many conversations about how to ensure that the United States retains its standing as the world’s most innovative and entrepreneurial nation, we have often looked to Detroit as a cautionary tale. In the 1950s, Detroit was like today’s Silicon Valley—a hotbed of entrepreneurial activity, booming with high-growth companies, and the heart of American innovation. But then Detroit lost its way. The epicenter of Detroit’s entrepreneurial ecosystem—the auto industry—went into decline. As a result, Detroit lost more than half of its population, and recently filed for bankruptcy. It lost its entrepreneurial mojo and became risk-adverse. And as its economy sputtered, its community struggled. Can Detroit get that mojo back, and rise again? We think the answer is yes.   More