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Government Techonomy Events

Reflections from Ross on Techonomy Policy 2015

“What is it we want to borrow from the tech world? The tech itself? Or a fundamentally different way of approaching problems?” Jennifer Pahlka, founder of Code for America, asked in a presentation last week in San Francisco. Her question mirrored one that came up at a number of sessions at our recent Techonomy Policy in Washington, D.C. Techonomy Policy was created to probe ideas at the confluence of tech and policy. We were well aware that there are many events and demands for people’s time in the Beltway, but we wanted to bring something a little different and a little more broad in its approach. The feedback we've gotten from participants suggests we succeeded. People told us it felt like a different kind of conversation for Washington.   More

Business Techonomy Events

Tech Leaders: Cooperation with Government Can Move U.S. Forward

From a founding father of the Internet who is now at the fore of interplanetary connectivity comes an evolved view: Competition need not be a zero sum game; collaboration can produce positive sum outcomes. Internet pioneer Vint Cerf made what he called a “bigger pie argument” at Techonomy Policy 2015 in Washington yesterday. To open the event, Cerf joined Techonomy CEO David Kirkpatrick for a discussion with AOL co-founder Steve Case and White House senior advisor for Internet, Innovation, and Privacy Policy R. David Edelman for a discussion about “Keeping America Innovative in the Age of Data Exhaust.” Cerf implored fellow panelists to drop the “competitive rhetoric” because “a rising tide raises all boats.”   More

Government Techonomy Events

Techonomy Policy June 9 in DC: the Age of Data Exhaust

Recently Techonomy hosted a dinner in New York, and our guests wanted relentlessly to talk about data. Where will society produce it? How much can we manage? Who will control it? What will they do to us with it? How can individuals retain influence over it? These are elemental questions for our era. They are questions that not only citizens, but government itself needs to be methodically asking. The dinner had nothing to do with our impending Techonomy Policy conference next Tuesday, June 9, in Washington. But it’s no coincidence that the opening session is entitled “Keeping America Innovative In the Age of Data Exhaust.”   More

Business Government Techonomy Events

Techonomy Policy 2015 Live Webcast

Techonomy Policy aims to bring a higher level of dialogue to the confluence of technology innovation and government. The need for the tech industry and Washington to better understand, engage and productively work together is crucial to the future of economic progress and social cohesion in our tech-enhanced, digitally-enabled times. As tech’s advances spread into virtually every sector of business and society, how do government and policy keep up and respond? And as tech companies aggressively move into diverse industries and more and more areas become tech-infused, how does business better work with policymakers?   More

Government

Can Government Get a Better Grip on Tech?

"I'm very worried," says Neelie Kroes, who has served as a vice president of the European Commission since 2010. "The changes in technology nowadays are so fast that we have to change our mindset. This is my biggest frustration in the commission. It takes so much time for governments to know what is at stake. We can't consult ten times about issues like we did in former times." Kroes's concerns are widely shared, especially in the United States. Says Steve Case, who spends as much time as any major tech leader working with leaders of both parties in Washington: "The pace of innovation continues to accelerate and outstrip the ability of governments to react."   More

Techonomy Events

Techonomy 2010-13: Highlights

A who's who of Techonomy participants join Techonomy founder David Kirkpatrick in a series of highlights from our 2010-12 conferences that address the growing impact of technology on business and society and why, increasingly, every company is a technology company.   More

Cities

With Philanthropy and Business the Coaches, Motor City Aims to Play Again

In our many conversations about how to ensure that the United States retains its standing as the world’s most innovative and entrepreneurial nation, we have often looked to Detroit as a cautionary tale. In the 1950s, Detroit was like today’s Silicon Valley—a hotbed of entrepreneurial activity, booming with high-growth companies, and the heart of American innovation. But then Detroit lost its way. The epicenter of Detroit’s entrepreneurial ecosystem—the auto industry—went into decline. As a result, Detroit lost more than half of its population, and recently filed for bankruptcy. It lost its entrepreneurial mojo and became risk-adverse. And as its economy sputtered, its community struggled. Can Detroit get that mojo back, and rise again? We think the answer is yes.   More

Techonomy Events

Looking Back at Techonomy Detroit

Techonomy 2012 kicks off in a few hours, gathering technology and business leaders in Tucson's Tortolita Mountains to discuss the possibilities of accelerating technological progress. This video overview of Techonomy Detroit is a great way to learn more about Techonomy's mission: the belief that technology can make the world a happier, healthier, wealthier, and more peaceful place.   More

Techonomy Events

Techonomy Media Returns to Tucson, Announces Techonomy 2012

Techonomy Media today announces its annual conference, Techonomy 2012, a unique three-day multidisciplinary gathering at The Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain in Tucson, Arizona, taking place November 11-13, 2012.   More

Business Cities

Why Techonomy Detroit?

People keep asking, "Why are you doing a Techonomy conference in Detroit?" We're known for our invite-only annual retreat in the desert near Tucson. So why, you may wonder, is our first one-day event in a gritty, depressed, financially-troubled city that seems well past its glory?   More

Business Startup Culture Techonomy Events

Steve Case on How to Stimulate Innovation

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Steve Case, CEO of Revolution LLC, discusses the current state of entrepreneurship in the US, and what needs to happen to encourage growth and innovation. He says that changes to immigration law, access to capital, and changes in regulation are necessary to fuel entrepreneurship.   More

Cities

Will Tech Save the First Western Post-Industrial City?

"If Detroit is on the brink of a revival, it’s technology that is proving to be the leading driver of job creation and economic growth," writes Detroit-based marketing exec Alex Southern for GrowDetroit. Southern's "if" acknowledges the pessimism some or his readers expressed last year in a survey about their hometown's prospects for recovery.   More