Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 20 of 23 results for “Silicon Valley”

Cities Startup Culture

Tech:NYC Celebrates and Shapes New York’s Tech Industry

Tech:NYC draws together local tech companies large and small to work with government, build industry ties and cultivate critical tech talent. It was only formed last year, but is already having a significant impact, both underscoring and contributing to the robust growth of technology in New York.   More

Business Manufacturing Startup Culture

Will Makerspaces Jumpstart a New Industrial Revolution?

After I first visited TechShop in 2006, I hypothesized that if makers could be given access to the tools of the industrial revolution at a cost they could afford, they could change the world. Nine years later we have innumerable examples of how this access has revolutionized who gets to make things, what gets made, and where and how they do it. In other words, it changes the very nature of manufacturing in America.   More

Keen On

KeenON: “Innovators” Author Walter Isaacson

Walter Isaacson, the biographer of great men like Ben Franklin, Albert Einstein, and Steve Jobs, has now turned to the history of the digital revolution. But rather than the story of genius, Isaacson’s "The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution," is actually a narrative of collaboration between talented people. Beginning with the remarkable relationship between Charles Babbage and Ida Lovelace in the middle of the 19th century, Isaacson sees the story of the digital revolution in terms of collaboration.   More

Jobs

How Software Can Help Move the Needle on Diversity

Even after spending my whole career in tech, I’m still taken aback by each new diversity stat that underscores the systemic and trenchant bias in our industry. One of my recent favorites: 76 percent of feedback given to women included negative criticism of a personality trait, while only 2 percent of men received such feedback. Or this from Fenwick and West: 45 percent of tech companies in Silicon Valley don’t have a single female at the executive level, compared with only 16 percent of the rest of S&P companies.   More

Media & Marketing

Detroit’s Stik Helps Companies Find Their Biggest Advocates

When we have important “life administration” decisions to make—getting a loan or a new health insurance plan—we often turn to people we know and trust. A Detroit startup called Stik is asking, “What if businesses could use the Internet to better harness the power of recommendations and benefit from the emerging ‘reputation economy?’” Stik’s end-to-end solution helps businesses grow through referrals, and lets consumers discover businesses they can trust using a new form of social advertising.   More

Global Tech

Baidu Chases Google in Silicon Valley

Chinese search leader Baidu is trumpeting its opening of a new R&D center in Silicon Valley, becoming the latest Chinese Internet company to make such a move in the tech capital of the world. The announcement is obviously full of symbolism, since Silicon Valley is home to global search leader Google, which once tried to purchase Baidu but was rebuffed by company founder Robin Li. Company watchers will also be asking if the move could auger a major new step for Baidu, which could see it challenge Google in lucrative but highly competitive western markets.   More

Business

Jaron Lanier on Facebook and the Creepy Possibilities for Virtual Reality

When Facebook announced last week that it had agreed to acquire Oculus VR, “the leader in virtual reality technology,” for $2 billion, techies and journalists everywhere wondered: What does Jaron Lanier think of this? Lanier, the dreadlocked futurist now working at Microsoft Research, was a virtual reality pioneer—he coined the term. More recently, he’s been a prolific critic of so-called Web 2.0 companies like Google and Facebook, bucking very publicly against their business models in books like "Who Owns the Future?" The Fiscal Times spoke with Lanier this week to get more of his thoughts about the deal, Mark Zuckerberg’s vision, and the future of virtual reality. Among his insights: “The biggest variable as to how creepy Facebook will be in the future is whether Zuck has kids or not.”   More

Global Tech Startup Culture

You Don’t Have to Live in Silicon Valley to Start a Company

Just about every city in the world is now teaming with young people (and some older ones) who are starting companies with ambitious and tech-savvy aims. This good essay by a former Facebook European executive underscores how pointless it is for everyone to compare their own region or city with Silicon Valley. Yes that hub will remain potent, but with tech transforming the entire planet there is ample reason for confidence that numerous other places can become vibrant hubs. The bigger challenge for Europe is the continuing prejudice in many countries against entrepreneurship and risk, and labor laws that frequently become punitive.   More

Government Startup Culture

Should Politicians Be More Like Silicon Valley Entrepreneurs?

Should all politicians have to launch a startup before entering politics? That’s the question I asked California’s Lieutenant Governor, Gavin Newsom, at the latest Ericsson and AT&T hosted FutureCast event held at the AT&T Foundry in Palo Alto. Newsom, the author of "Citizenville," a kind of digital manifesto for 21st century networked politics, didn’t beat around the bush. “Yes," Newsom replied, sounding more like a startup guy than a career politician.   More

Startup Culture

Why Do People Still Come to Silicon Valley?

The traffic is terrible, the real-estate ridiculously expensive, the public schools aren’t that great and the gulf between rich and poor is increasingly pronounced. So why do people still come to Silicon Valley? That’s the question we asked participants at a recent Ericsson and AT&T Foundry hosted FutureCast event that focused on innovation in Silicon Valley. The answers from our international audience were varied, instructive and entertaining.   More

Startup Culture

Can Silicon Valley Survive?

Silicon Valley hasn’t had one of its best years. There are more and more complaints about inequality, discrimination against women and minorities, lack of innovation and a focus on short-term economic gain. The Valley, veterans say, isn’t what it used to be. And, they go on, if Silicon Valley is to survive, it has to reinvent itself in an increasingly competitive global economy where most of the rest of the world is trying to emulate the Valley. So, I asked David Kirkpatrick, when I interviewed him at an Ericsson and AT&T Foundry hosted FutureCast event that focused on the future of innovation, how exactly can Silicon Valley reinvent itself?   More

Startup Culture

Are the Best and Brightest Still Coming to Silicon Valley?

Are the smartest entrepreneurs and technologists still attracted to Silicon Valley? Does the Valley still pull in the best and brightest from around the world? According to David Kirkpatrick, who I interviewed at an Ericsson and AT&T Foundry hosted FutureCast event, the answer may well be no. Kirkpatrick tells the story of a remarkably talented Chinese guy he met in Beijing recently who had read his book, “The Facebook Effect,” five times. “I was just amazed I stumbled across that in Beijing,” he told me. This guy, Kirkpatrick explained, was running a 20-person Beijing startup just focused on making Facebook games.   More

Startup Culture

Is Silicon Valley the Center of the Innovation Universe?

Silicon Valley takes it for granted that it’s the center of the innovation universe. But that, of course, is a weakness—which points to the often parochial and inward looking nature of many Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and investors. So is Silicon Valley really the center of the innovation universe? That’s the question we asked an invitation-only crowd who came to the AT&T Foundry in Palo Alto to hear me interview David Kirkpatrick at the Ericsson and AT&T hosted FutureCast event.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Techonomy Events

How the ’60s Counterculture Is Still Driving the Tech Revolution

Every innovation starts with an act of insubordination. So said tech entrepreneur, futurist, and scientist Walter de Brouwer. “It starts with saying ‘no,’ with disrespect. If you respect and listen to everything, there is no innovation.” Does an insubordinate counterculture still drive innovation in today's cyberculture? It’s a question that a panel pondered at the Techonomy 2013 conference in Tucson last week. De Brouwer, CEO of health-tech company Scanadu, joined author Stewart Brand, tech journalist Ina Fried, and Techonomy's David Kirkpatrick for an after-dinner fireside chat about the culture that’s now driving IT’s evolution.   More

Cities

Etsy CEO Chad Dickerson on the Next Wave of Tech Hubs

Does adding "Silicon" before a community's name make it a better place for tech? Etsy CEO Chad Dickerson would answer with a resounding "No," saying the practice is one of his personal pet peeves. Dickerson talked at Techonomy Detroit about how cities like Detroit can remain authentic by embracing their unique identities. "Every city should try to be itself," he said, noting that part of Detroit's heritage is its long history of innovation and making things. "Detroit has that maker culture really baked into the city."   More

Finance Internet of Things

A16Z’s Chris Dixon on the Internet of Locks, Cars, New York, and Everything Else

Chris Dixon is a New York guy with a degree in philosophy from Columbia University. He’s also, as of last fall, a partner at hot Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz (which shortens its name to A16Z—16 is the number of letters between the A and the Z). All in all, that gives him a pretty interesting point of view on the big technology shift that’s being labeled the Internet of Everything (IoE). Dixon already has quite a track record as an investor and entrepreneur. He co-founded Hunch, which eBay bought for $80 million in 2011, and then started Founder Collective, a seed-stage venture fund. Alone or with a fund, he’s been an early-stage investor in Kickstarter, Pinterest, Foursquare, Dropbox, and Warby Parker.   More

Business Cities

From the Model T to P2P: How Automotive Innovation is Changing Detroit (Again)

San Francisco's Uber has turned the limo and cab industry upside down by offering a car service that books rides on demand from smartphones. Users can request vehicles and complete transactions entirely through a mobile app. This method creates efficiencies that don't exist in traditional limo/cab offerings: upon request for a vehicle, the app sends the picture, name, and direct contact number of your driver to your smartphone. GPS enables real-time tracking as the driver approaches your pickup location, and upon reaching your destination, payment is automatically processed (gratuity included) through the app. In short, Uber has radically streamlined the customer experience for both driver and passenger.   More

Business

Too Much Like-Mindedness Hurts Companies, and the Country

After the political rhetoric and partisan saber-rattling of the elections, the fiscal cliff debate, and recent presidential appointments, the country seems increasingly divided. In their book, The Big Sort: Why the Clustering of Like-Minded America is Tearing Us Apart, Bill Bishop and Robert Cushing focus on one of the long-term trends driving the political rift. As Americans have become increasingly mobile over the last 40 years, they have sorted themselves into increasingly homogeneous neighborhoods, choosing to live near those who share similar beliefs, backgrounds, and socioeconomic status.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Startup’s Data Helps Women Succeed With In Vitro Fertilization

In vitro fertilization (IVF), a last recourse for women who want to get pregnant, is expensive, and its outcome is uncertain. Now a Silicon Valley data-mining startup is significantly improving predictions about whether a woman's IVF will succeed. Reproductive health scientist Dr. Mylene Yao and Stanford statistics professor Wing Wong, founders of Univfy, compare detailed personal health information with large data sets taken from past efforts with thousands of women to predict the likely results of IVF treatment. It’s easy to see why it might be in demand.   More

Manufacturing Techonomy Events

Why Making Things Still Matters

Innovation and the desire for innovation are nationally and globally pervasive. But by any measure of geographic or economic density, most of us still see Silicon Valley as the leader and lodestar of innovation. It’s interesting to take a moment and reflect on the very name Silicon Valley. It is, after all, named after a chemical element and a technology for making things. At its roots, Silicon Valley was about making transistors, integrated circuits and chips, and, of course, the application of these for computing and software.   More