Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 20 of 29 results for “sharing economy”

Analytics & Data Community Insights Startup Culture

Lack of Trust is Holding Back the Sharing Economy

The sharing economy is stagnant. Rides may still be going up, but rooms, crowdfunding, and other services are flat or declining. The reason can be summed up in a word: trust. Millennials are the sharing economy's best hope--but will it be enough?   More

Community Insights Jobs Society

Why an Improving Economy Doesn’t Make People Feel Secure

The 2016 election ignited rich debate about America's economic health. Some great new sources of real data help explain why American families worry about their financial health even as unemployment continues to drop and wage and GDP growth are rising.   More

Energy & Green Tech Internet of Things

Arun Sundararajan on IoT, the Sharing Economy, and Energy

In an interview with Techonomy’s Josh Kampel, NYU’s Arun Sundararajan, author of the newly-released The Sharing Economy, talks about how the Internet of Things intersects with the sharing economy, and how the energy industry is about to be disrupted. Sundararajan  is speaking at Techonomy NYC on May 26 at NYU. To join us, email TENYC@Techonomy.com.   More

Analytics & Data Internet of Things Partner Insights

Why Verizon is Betting on The Internet of Things

The "Internet of Things" is the next big move as the economy goes digital. Measuring and acting on signals generated by everything from steps individuals take to the amount of water flowing over a dam, a vast new industry is emerging to bring more efficiency to society. In a comprehensive new report released Tuesday, Verizon outlines why this Internet of Things (IoT) transition is critical to business. The company has products, a platform, and enormous enthusiasm for this transformation.   More

Cities Transportation

The Techonomic Pleasures of Renting a Bicycle in Austin

As the on-demand economy grows, people increasingly rent things just when they need them, with services like TaskRabbit, Uber, Airbnb, and RideShare. And urban bicycle rental services are burgeoning. In Austin, Texas recently, I discovered the one there is impressively well run. It integrates just the right cyber and physical elements to deliver a glass-smooth experience.   More

E-Commerce Techonomy Events

April Rinne of WEF on Regulating the Sharing Economy

​The sharing economy has taken off with the dramatic rise of companies like Uber and Airbnb, but the measures to regulate it are lagging far behind. April Rinne of the World Economic Forum says the public’s perception of what’s necessary to extend the benefits of so-called collaborative consumption to everyone—high and low income alike—is also lagging. “At the end of the day, sharing rather than owning assets, regardless of how much you have, still helps you save money,” Rinne said at September's Techonomy Detroit conference at Wayne State University. “We need to rethink whether we’re looking at this as there’s one model for hipsters and people that are well-to-do and there’s another model for low income. There’s a whole lot of opportunity in the middle.”   More

E-Commerce Techonomy Events

The Economics of Sharing

Airbnb, DogVacay, Uber, Lyft and TaskRabbit. A host of new platforms are transforming the economics of sharing. But what does their rapid spread mean for a city and its citizens? Is the sharing economy the future of employment, compensation, and exchange of value? As the trend reorients business, social and cultural norms, how can we ensure that cities and citizens become beneficiaries? TaskRabbit's Stacy Brown-Philpot, April Rinne of the World Economic Forum, and NYU's Arun Sundararajan discuss the future of the sharing economy in this session from Techonomy Detroit 2014, moderated by Jennifer Bradley of the Brookings Institution.   More

E-Commerce Government

Can Uber Reroute Germany to a Shareable Future?

In "The Zero Marginal Cost Society," economic theorist and writer Jeremy Rifkin coins the term Collaborative Commons to describe the "digitalized space where providers and users share goods and services" in the emerging "shareable economy." It's no surprise then that Rifkin casts as shortsighted the German court system's decision this week to ban in that country the low-cost UberPop service from Uber, the global carsharing service. In response to a lawsuit filed by Taxi Deutschland in Frankfurt, the court ruled that Uber lacked legal permits to pick up passengers.   More

E-Commerce Government

Governments and Sharing: Lessons from the UK’s Beyond Jobs Project

What can governments do to boost the sharing economy? What would be their incentive to do so? Where are the commercial opportunities if public policy were to fully embrace sharing transactions? I have spent 20 years writing, consulting, and overseeing publicly funded projects based on these questions. The answers in brief: governments are potentially the biggest buyers of fragmented labor, its regulators, setters of tax/welfare codes, administrators of databases of record, and ideally will serve as marketing machines for economic initiatives.   More

Business E-Commerce

New Economics: Sharing Isn’t Free, and Price Gouging Isn’t Mean

The pros and cons of the so-called "sharing economy" are getting plenty of press these days. Consider the diverse takes this week from Technology Review, the New York Times, and the Kansas City Star. In a Times report about workers who are finding "both freedom and uncertainty" in the contract employment trend, Natasha Singer explains how Navy veteran Jennifer Guidry attempts to help cover her family's food and rent costs with popup gigs.   More

Business

The End of Industries

In my field of business journalism, writers have traditionally had "beats" that corresponded to specific industries. One might cover energy, autos, airlines, financial services, or media. Similarly, analysts on Wall Street have specialized along similar lines. Rankings and ratings of companies by industry continue to proliferate. But today such categorizations are increasingly an obstacle to understanding rather than useful demarcations for meaningful analysis. Many of today's most exciting companies do not fall neatly into a conventional category. Business in a technologized age has raced ahead to a new unbounded shape.   More

E-Commerce

Sharing Economy in Cities: Moving Towards a More Inclusive Urban Future

The sharing economy makes headlines daily: from anti-Uber protests across Europe to Airbnb's recent $10 billion valuation, new start-ups entering the private sector are offering more things to share (or rent, swap, borrow or barter) and more ways to do so. Quietly and gradually, however, a parallel evolution is taking place in the public sector.   More

E-Commerce Government

Can a Sharing Platform for Artists Point to a More Equitable Society?

What do you do if you’re an artist in need of supplies, but you happen to be broke? Creative people have been pooling and exchanging resources for generations. Now, the emerging Internet-enabled sharing economy makes it easier than ever to swap, say, legal advice for lumber. That’s the kind of transaction that OurGoods, a new resource-sharing platform for artists, actually facilitates. OurGoods also serves “designers, technologists, makers, farmers, and activists,” said co-founder and activist Caroline Woolard when we talked to her at the recent Sharing Economy Summit at NYU’s Stern School of Business. “Artists have a lot of skills and also education, but don’t necessarily have money to pay each other to get their work done,” said Woolard. But OurGoods doesn’t just aim for one-off online bartering. Its greater goal is to build what Woolard calls “cross-class trust networks” that “enable a kind of trust-building that leads to social justice.”   More

E-Commerce

Want to Donate Your Old Sofa to Charity? There’s an App for That

The sharing economy is rooted in the idea that at any given moment, the things that people own—their tools, their cars, and sometimes even their homes—are sitting idle, ready to be used by someone who needs them. The Internet is a natural marketplace for matching these assets with consumers, in many cases providing a revenue stream for the owners who sell or rent them. For those motivated more by giving than by profit, now there’s a platform for selling their unwanted stuff and seamlessly donating the proceeds to charity. By streamlining charitable donations, WebThriftStore provides an essential service for non-profits, which often don’t have the infrastructure to process in-kind donations, let alone the resources to run a physical store.   More

E-Commerce

Writing the Rules of the Sharing Economy

The sharing economy has been called the next big disruptor. But is it disrupting enough? Fast enough? Broadly enough? The answers depend on whom you ask. As sharing expands into more industries and infiltrates more cities, it’s hard to keep up with the changes and understand whether they amount to progress. “We should be looking forward and asking ourselves, ‘What kind of future do we want to create?’” said Airbnb Co-founder and CTO Nathan Blecharczyk at the Collaborative, Peer, and Sharing Economy Summit at New York University last week. The summit sought to take a big-picture look at the much-hyped sharing economy, examining not only what it is, but also its effects, the platforms and institutions powering it, and the regulatory questions it’s raising.   More

E-Commerce

Internet Grocery Shopping Meets the Sharing Economy

San Francisco-based startup Instacart is hoping to trump services like AmazonFresh, Peapod, and FreshDirect in the battle to deliver fresh food to your door. But unlike those bigger players, Instacart uses the tactics of the maturing sharing economy. The online grocery startup aims to deliver the same experience we now expect from sharing-economy darlings like Uber and Airbnb.   More

Cities E-Commerce

Airbnb Will Give New York Home-Sharers’ Addresses to State

Airbnb has agreed to hand over information about its New York hosts in order to comply with a subpoena it received last week from the New York Attorney General. The NYAG's office had claimed that "more than 60 percent of the service's listings in New York City on Jan. 31 appeared to violate a 2010 law targeting illicit hotels," Bloomberg reports. Crain's New York today published a letter of agreement that was signed yesterday between Airbnb General Counsel Belinda Johnson and Clark Russell, Deputy Bureau Chief of the Internet Bureau in the New York Attorney General's Office.   More

Business Internet of Things

Will the Internet of Things Undermine Capitalism?

Jeremy Rifkin writes in the New York Times about the future of the collaborative, sharing, free economy, making some original new points. Most notably, he argues that because the Internet of Things will radically accelerate the growth of sharing and efficiency, it will implicitly lead to a reduction in capitalism itself and a further rise in the importance of non-profit institutions. The rise of "free goods," tackled directly at Techonomy 2012 by MIT economist Erik Brynolffson, is in Rifkin's opinion now going to extend well beyond the digital and virtual (where things like Gmail, this website, and innumerable other free opportunities are available). Rifkin argues that capitalism, while it has a future, will become a "niche" part of the economy. Philanthropy and NGOs may become much more central to all of our notions of social leadership and economic health.   More

Cities Energy & Green Tech

Ford’s Farley Wants P2P Sharing and Electric Cars for Urban Mobility

As the urban population soars, city streets are growing increasingly traffic-clogged and difficult to navigate, impeding our ease of transit and, more critically, harming our environment. At our Techonomy 2013 conference, we talked to Jim Farley, EVP of global marketing at Ford, about the car industry and using shared ownership to tackle urban mobility. While business-to-consumer models (think Zipcar) have thus far dominated the shared-ownership market, they have struggled to succeed financially. Farley believes a peer-to-peer system of sharing vehicles is more promising. Electrifying the car industry, he added, will be an important part of developing this peer-to-peer system, enabling us to be more economical, more efficient, and kinder to our Earth.   More

Cities E-Commerce

Brookings’s Bradley: A Sharing Economy That Serves All

We know the sharing economy as an efficient and convenient resource, and launchpad for trendy startups like Uber, Airbnb, and TaskRabbit. But the sharing economy could help address needs for a much wider swath of society, instead of just enabling better options for the already-privileged. At Techonomy 2013, Brookings Institution fellow Jennifer Bradley discussed the sharing economy's opportunity for inclusion, such as creating an Uber-like system to help low-income people get to work, and enabling the sharing of essential "means of production" like 3D printers and power tools.   More