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Techonomy Events

Four Ways Techonomy 2015 Made News: “Why hasn’t every CEO committed to making sure women and men are paid the same?”

At least four big things happened at Techonomy 2015: Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker announced the department's Digital Economy Agenda, Marc Benioff called for equality as a corporate virtue, social network creator Sean Parker criticized social networks as havens of narcissism, and McKinsey explained just how complex for every kind of worker will be the transition to a partially-automated world.   More

Techonomy Events

Reflections from Ross: Memorable Quotes from Techonomy 2015

Brought up at Techonomy 2015: Afghan social networks, algorithms, ants, artificial intelligence, augmented reality, biofabrication, blockchain, business accelerators for women and minorities, digital economy, empathy, equality, fashion, Internet of things, ISIS, justice, libraries, neuroscience, neurotech, pay parity, privacy, robots for mining, values (of people, computers and networks), voting machines that are too old, Taliban's use of bluetooth marketing, and virtual reality. Here are tidbits from some of the best sessions.   More

Techonomy Events

Techonomy 2015: Human Values in An Age of Tech

The transition to a technologized and interconnected society is challenging for everyone, everywhere. As we gain new efficiencies and capabilities, we still need to keep amity and constructive human interaction as our supreme priority. But it's not easy. That's why we call the upcoming Techonomy 2015 conference "Re-Humanizing Society." The opening session on Sunday November 8 is "Human Values in a Technologized Age." Joining the conversation in Half Moon Bay, California: Benioff, Chambers, Lanier, Parker, Prabhakar, and Pritzker.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Government Techonomy Events

Growing Bones and On-Demand Joints: Top Picks from TE Bio and Policy

This year's Techonomy Bio and Policy conferences examined critical fields being altered by the progress of tech. We covered everything from growing bones to decoding the brain at TE Bio in March. Then TE Policy explored the not always happy confluence of tech innovation and government. We had briefings on Blockchain and the Internet of Things, and deep dives on cyberwar and the European single digital market. We closed with Senators Booker and Fischer and the inimitable Sean Parker on tech, innovation and American progress.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Towards a Bipartisan Tech Strategy in D.C.

Should America have a bipartisan technology agenda? It certainly seems like a good idea. And Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey argued for one emphatically at the closing session of the Techonomy Policy conference in Washington in early June. What made the session remarkable, at least to those of us whose expectations are dulled by the deluge of punditry proclaiming partisan deadlock in Washington, is that Senator Deb Fischer of Nebraska agreed with him. Fischer of course is a Republican, and Booker a Democrat. Booker says we are now too often choking innovation rather than allowing it to flourish. Meanwhile, Sean Parker, the tech entrepreneur and investor, who joined the two onstage, spoke passionately about his own bipartisan approach to policy advocacy. He says his friends call him crazy for not just supporting politicians of one party, but he says he thinks "it's actually quite sane."   More

Government Techonomy Events

Reflections from Ross on Techonomy Policy 2015

“What is it we want to borrow from the tech world? The tech itself? Or a fundamentally different way of approaching problems?” Jennifer Pahlka, founder of Code for America, asked in a presentation last week in San Francisco. Her question mirrored one that came up at a number of sessions at our recent Techonomy Policy in Washington, D.C. Techonomy Policy was created to probe ideas at the confluence of tech and policy. We were well aware that there are many events and demands for people’s time in the Beltway, but we wanted to bring something a little different and a little more broad in its approach. The feedback we've gotten from participants suggests we succeeded. People told us it felt like a different kind of conversation for Washington.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Onstage at TE Policy, a Bipartisan Call for Policies that Don’t Screw Up Innovation

Tech policy development may help strange bedfellows get better acquainted. At Techonomy Policy 2015 in Washington last week, tech billionaire Sean Parker joined Nebraska Senator Deb Fischer, a Republican cattle rancher, and New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, a vegan Democrat, for a conversation with Techonomy CEO David Kirkpatrick about “Technology, Innovation, and American Progress.” Parker, whose teen hacking escapades were sufficiently sophisticated that they were investigated by the FBI, joked that he was appearing as “Senator from the Internet.” The to-some-infamous cofounder of Napster, past president of Facebook, and investor in Spotify is fast becoming known as a bipartisan political contributor and policy wonk. His new venture, Brigade, aims to put the voter back at “the center of our democracy.” He also recently launched a Washington think tank devoted to bipartisan strategies for economic growth, called the Economic Innovation Group (EIG).   More

Government Techonomy Events

Reflections from Ross: Techonomy Policy Next Tuesday

Our first Techonomy Policy conference takes place in Washington, DC, next week. This is our third focused new conference we've launched since the first wide-ranging Techonomy event in 2010. In 2012, we added Techonomy Detroit, and in 2013, we began our Techonomy Bio series. So why Techonomy Policy? There are many reasons. One is that in order for tech leaders and innovators to create the impact and benefit they envision, they must understand the complex ecosystem of government well enough to become valued partners and to create responsive relationships. The role of government, governance, and policy cannot simply be ignored. In addition, in a time when tech is changing everything around us at a rapidly accelerating pace, leaders of the institutions that serve us need close relationships with the techies who are changing the world.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Techonomy Policy June 9 in DC: the Age of Data Exhaust

Recently Techonomy hosted a dinner in New York, and our guests wanted relentlessly to talk about data. Where will society produce it? How much can we manage? Who will control it? What will they do to us with it? How can individuals retain influence over it? These are elemental questions for our era. They are questions that not only citizens, but government itself needs to be methodically asking. The dinner had nothing to do with our impending Techonomy Policy conference next Tuesday, June 9, in Washington. But it’s no coincidence that the opening session is entitled “Keeping America Innovative In the Age of Data Exhaust.”   More

Business Government Techonomy Events

Techonomy Policy 2015 Live Webcast

Techonomy Policy aims to bring a higher level of dialogue to the confluence of technology innovation and government. The need for the tech industry and Washington to better understand, engage and productively work together is crucial to the future of economic progress and social cohesion in our tech-enhanced, digitally-enabled times. As tech’s advances spread into virtually every sector of business and society, how do government and policy keep up and respond? And as tech companies aggressively move into diverse industries and more and more areas become tech-infused, how does business better work with policymakers?   More

Techonomy Events

Techonomy 2010-13: Highlights

A who's who of Techonomy participants join Techonomy founder David Kirkpatrick in a series of highlights from our 2010-12 conferences that address the growing impact of technology on business and society and why, increasingly, every company is a technology company.   More

Startup Culture Techonomy Events

Sean Parker on How Startup Culture Diffuses Talent

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Sean Parker, Managing Partner at Founders Fund and a co-founder of Napster, argues that startup culture pulls critical talent into meaningless endeavors, instead of concentrating it on ideas that have true potential.   More

Techonomy Events

Sean Parker: Tech Isn’t Done Revolutionizing Music Industry

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Sean Parker, Managing Partner of Founders Fund and a co-founder of Napster, talks about how he believes technology will revolutionize the music industry, and how companies like Spotify and Napster already have.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Sean Parker on Platforms for Individual Empowerment

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Sean Parker, Managing Partner of Founders Fund, discusses Votizen and Causes, two companies helping to empower the individuals in the political sphere.   More

Business Techonomy Events

Sean Parker on How Global Currency Collapse Will Improve Markets

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Sean Parker, Managing Partner at Founders Fund and a co-founder of Napster, asserts that the collapse of currencies worldwide, starting in European countries, will improve markets more than investing in new technologies.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Sean Parker: Can Direct Democracy Work?

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Sean Parker, Managing Partner of Founders Fund and a co-founder of Napster, talks about tensions between the theory and practice of direct democracy.   More

Techonomy Events

Sean Parker on the Negative Consequences of Social Networks

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Sean Parker, Managing Partner at Founders Fund and a co-founder of Napster, highlights some of the potential negative consequences of social networks.   More