Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results for “quantified self”

Analytics & Data Healthcare

Self-Tracked Consumers Can Steer Health Decisions with Data

Most people want to control certain kinds of data. Consider banking information: you may share account access with a spouse, but beyond that, you won’t hand those reins to anybody. It’s not just high-security data, either. Who doesn’t know married couples who insist on separate Netflix accounts, so one person’s movie choices don’t mess up the other’s queue? But when it comes to our health information, it’s a different story. Why is it that with this data—the closest we are likely to come to having life-or-death information—we throw our hands in the air and hope medical professionals make the right choices?   More

Internet of Things

Pew Survey: Internet of Things Offers Promise, but Concerns Linger

Your houseplant emails you when it wants to be watered. Your baby's diaper texts you when it needs changing. And your refrigerator sends you a shopping list the second you set foot in a grocery store. But when you walk to the ice cream aisle and grab a tub of mint chocolate chip, the shirt monitoring your heart rate tells you you'd better put it back. This is the future that awaits us, as the Internet of Things encompasses more and more of our everyday lives. And it's bound to be here within the next 10 years, according to a recent study by the Pew Research Center.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

As Fitbits for Feelings Emerge, Whither Empathy?

Are we losing touch with one another? Are we sinking towards something like Roman civilization, when bloodthirsty spectators eagerly watched men fight to the death in the name of entertainment, now just on high-def screens? Or could empathy in society actually be enhanced by the capabilities of technology? Could machines sense our emotions better than our friends and family can and broadcast that data to them? It's not a crazy idea. In fact, wearable technologies are starting to emerge that are specifically designed to give viewers a sense of what’s going on inside another person. They may be crude now, but they will get better.   More

Business Internet of Things

When the Quantified Self Wants to Conceive a Child

As if baby making isn't exciting enough, the new venture of angel investor Max Levchin and his four-man founding team promises that "using Glow to conceive is effective and more fun!" Described on the company website as "an ambitious enterprise where for the first time ever, our emerging ability to crunch and analyze vast quantities of data will be specifically used to help get you pregnant," Glow is a free iPhone fertility app.   More

Internet of Things

Trae Vassallo’s Tour of Functional Geek Fashion

In May, Kleiner Perkins partner Trae Vassallo wrote an article for Techonomy.com about how Google Glass makes her a more efficient mom. At Techonomy's recent Internet of Everything event in Menlo Park, we caught up with Vassallo and asked her to talk more about her passion for wearable technology. She showed off her Basis watch, which gives her insight into her physical health and can even predict when she's about to get sick, and her Google Glass, which she prefers to wear in sunglass mode to tone down the geek factor.   More

Business

Venturing Out with Memoto’s Lifelogging Camera

I’m sitting across from an older man in a navy blue coat and a red sweater in the crowded Stockholm metro, on my way to celebrate a friend’s birthday. Unremarkable, except that I’m recording it all with a Memoto Lifelogging Camera on my lapel. The man and I do our best to avoid eye contact. This is going well until I start fiddling with the camera, concerned it’s not shooting straight ahead. This catches his attention and for a second he takes in the small gadget. The prototype’s transparent shell exposes the components inside, but the man looks away and doesn’t seem overly concerned.   More

Business

Can Lifelogging Devices Augment Our Memories?

In one of the latest runaway crowdfunding success stories, the Swedish creators of the lifelogging device Memoto, hoping to raise $50,000 through Kickstarter, wound up raising more than $540,000 in just a month. Clearly, something about their project captured donors' imaginations. The stamp-sized camera clips to users' lapels and takes a high-res photo every 30 seconds. Built-in GPS and accompanying software enable users to see a timeline of their activity when they plug in the device to recharge. Memoto is the newest tool for acolytes of the growing "Quantified Self" movement, which aims to use technology to process the endless stream of data that is a human life. When Gordon Bell spoke about his lifelogging habits at Techonomy 2012, he was wearing a similar camera developed by Microsoft Research on a string around his neck.   More