Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results for “John Hagel”

Internet of Things

How the Internet of Things Will Make Products Better and More Personal

As consumers, we expect the world to shape itself around us. Consumer power has been growing for the past several years, and with it, an expectation of products and services that not only meet our particular tastes but also our particular needs over time. But engaging the customer isn’t always straightforward. Even if you’re listening to customers, what if they don’t (or can’t) articulate what they want? What if they have needs they aren’t even aware of yet?   More

Arts & Culture Techonomy Events

Ross Reflections: Looking Towards Detroit, and Some Amazing Bio/Artist/Designers

It’s been a busy couple of weeks as we continue to fine-tune the program for September’s Techonomy Detroit. If you’re in Detroit September 15 you should stop by—we’ll be interviewing Mark Bertolini, the refreshing, bead wearing, yogi-like CEO of Aetna. We’ll also be interviewing Carl Bass, the wood carving, boat- and furniture-making CEO of Autodesk. Tiana Epps-Johnson, Executive Director of The Center for Technology and Civic Life, will present on “Civic Tech and the New Digital Divide,” longtime tech entrepreneur and thinker Peter Hirshberg will present on “A Maker City Is a Jazz City,” and "Edge" theorist John Hagel will talk about how companies and cities are successfully “Learning from Movements.”   More

Finance Techonomy Events

Why Disruptive Change Points to a New Humanism in Banking

Value is being redefined, and many are rethinking what constitutes real wealth and well-being, beyond money and GDP. We have to rethink how we measure wealth. Robert Kennedy said: “GDP measures everything ... except that which makes life worthwhile." Happiness indicators like Bhutan’s Gross National Happiness, the OECD’s Better Life Index, and the UK’s Happy Planet Index are already helping the world define well-being and wealth beyond money.   More

Business

John Hagel on How Businesses Build Around Innovation

John Hagel is a regular contributor for Techonomy and a director with Deloitte. He and John Seely Brown, co-chairs of Deloitte’s Center for the Edge, recently published a report tackling one of Techonomy’s central themes: How can institutions adapt to exponential technology change and reorganize themselves for “scalable efficiency?” Techonomy's Adam Ludwig interviewed Hagel by email about the key ways organizations can foster an innovative environment for learning and transformation.   More

Business

What the Sharing Economy Means for Business

With digital peer-to-peer platforms emerging in dozens of vertical markets, the sharing economy appears to be in its own Cambrian explosion of diversity. Participants share cars, bicycles, houses, clothing, tools, and a growing array of other consumer goods. “Collaborative consumption” is gaining traction among customers and finally attracting the attention of regulators and entrenched incumbents—not just taxi cabs and hotels, but increasingly automakers and manufacturers of other consumer goods that have built businesses on seemingly endless demand for ownership.   More

Business Finance Government

What’s Next in the Techonomy?

In the last few decades, we have witnessed exponential technological growth and change. However, as we enter the second half of the metaphorical chessboard, it remains unclear how that technology will reshape our economy, political systems, and collective future. One thing is clear: in the hands of existing institutions—firms, schools, non-profits, civic institutions and governments—this awesome technology will achieve only a fraction of its potential.   More

Jobs

Skills Gap Widening on Two Fronts, Deloitte Team Concludes

One interpretation of the skills gap is that the knowledge acquired to earn a college degree is becoming obsolete faster than ever before. But, according to research by William D. Eggers, John Hagel, and Owen Sanderson of Deloitte, workers in fields that require a college education aren't the only ones whose career opportunities are becoming harder to define. So-called blue-collar worker now also have to keep up with rapidly evolving technology, as new jobs require skills like fluency in CAD blueprints or LEED certification requirements.   More