Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 13 of 13 results for “India”

Community Insights Healthcare

Why Tuberculosis Persists

Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the great scourges. Amazingly, one of every three people in the world is infected. Why it persists: political leaders do not understand its sociology; scientists lack effective paradigms to attack it; and the rich and famous no longer die from it. We need fewer excuses and more action.   More

Finance Government

India Tackles Corruption with Currency Chaos

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi interrupted most evening news in his country last Tuesday to announce that in just three hours, the Indian government would bar the use of 85% of its existing currency. This dramatic announcement comes as India seeks to root out untaxed “black money."   More

Global Tech Media & Marketing

The Facebook Pushback in India: Anti-Corporate, Anti-American, Anti-Poor

There's huge controversy in India over Facebook's "Free Basics" Internet plan, part of the global Internet.org initiative the company has been spearheading. Facebook's aim, it says, is to get more people onto the Internet, since being online is essential for participation in any modern economy. In India, however, the project is encountering fierce resistance from elites who say it violates "net neutrality." But do all the critics--mostly upper-class and affluent Indian pundits, professors and anti-corporate activists--have a better way to get many millions of less-privileged Indians onto the Internet?   More

Media & Marketing

Are Media Companies One Native Ad Away from Becoming Press-titutes?

When we were asked to participate in Omidyar’s “Future of Media in India” event, David Kirkpatrick and I both questioned what we could add on a topic that was pretty far from our own experience. In hindsight, we knew more than we gave ourselves credit for. The India market, it turns out, is not much different than that of the US, maybe just a couple of years behind. Publishers and journalists are eager to transition from print to digital, they are trying to figure out how to reach their readers in a mobile-first world, and they are struggling to find a sustainable business model to support their efforts.    More

Business

Why Asia Matters for LinkedIn

As LinkedIn works to connect all the world’s professionals, CEO Jeff Weiner is increasingly setting his sights on a bigger vision—to create economic opportunity for every member of the global workforce. Since Asia accounts for a large portion of that workforce and a rising share of global economic activity, its importance for the professional network is bound to grow. At Techonomy 2014, Weiner envisioned LinkedIn as a platform that connects all the world’s workers, companies, and educational institutions. This is not an impossible dream. LinkedIn already has more than 364 million registered members globally.   More

Davos 2015 Learning

Davos 2015: Going to School’s Lisa Heydlauff on Empowering Young Entrepreneurs in India

Going to School CEO Lisa Heydlauff joins Hub Culture at the World Economic Forum Davos 2015. Heydlauff discusses her organization's mission to empower poor children in India with entrepreneurial skills.   More

Business

In Kolkata, Wi-Fi Takes a Back Seat to Physical Infrastructure

I thought I would spend two weeks in Kolkata, India, sitting on my family’s patio backdropped by palm trees, leisurely writing away. But there was a fatal flaw to my plan: My family warned me upon my arrival that I would have to find an office building that provided public Wi-Fi access before I could get online. The inconvenient problem is city-wide. Annanya Roy, a college student in Kolkata, says she is starved of good Internet coverage on campus. “We are a community with the wants of Wi-Fi, settling for something far less contenting,” Roy says.   More

Business

Asia Is Getting LinkedIn, But Not Everywhere

LinkedIn, the world’s largest social network for professionals, has a massive presence in Asia—over 40 million members with the user base growing daily. Yet it is substantially more successful in some places than others. India accounts for roughly half of its total users in the region. Southeast Asia and Australia together account for another quarter. Penetration in East Asia, however, is lower, especially considering how many professionals live in China, Japan, and Korea. Many factors account for differences in uptake, but cultural factors are very significant.   More

Global Tech

A Farewell: The Professor Who Made India a Tech Power

A remarkable character in the history of technology died this week in Bangalore. Few in the West have even heard of him, yet every Indian technology company, every U.S. corporation that ever sent software development to India, and in fact the entire globalized world-is-flat economy owes him a debt of gratitude. Padma Bhushan N. Seshagiri was an unlikely tech industry hero. While doing a project in India over the past 18 months, I got to know him a little. He struck me as brash, brilliant, and nerdy. When he talked about all of the incredible behind-the-scenes roles he played in launching the Indian tech sector, I at first thought he had an overblown sense of himself. It turns out he didn’t.   More

Techonomy Events

Five Forces Shaping the Future

The 21st century didn’t start in the year 2000. It started in 2010, the same way the 20th century began in 1908 with the advent of the automobile. It became the century of highways and freeways, the century of the auto—the American century. Similarly, if you look at what happened a couple of years ago, there were all kinds of crossover points that happened around the same time: more cell phones than landlines, more laptops than desktops, more debit cards than credit cards, more farmed fish than wild fish, more girls in college than boys.   More

Business Cities

Friedman vs. Florida, or How to Thrive in a World Both Flat and Spiky

The regional effect of technological advancement and globalization is a widely studied and hotly contested topic. Thomas Friedman’s renowned book, The World is Flat, argues that globalization and technological advancement have leveled the playing field in terms of commerce—that location is less and less important. These technologies, Friedman writes, have contributed to the meteoric rise of the Indian and Chinese middle class and will continue to decrease barriers to international flows of goods and knowledge.   More

Learning Techonomy Events

Scott Cook on How Technology Can Revolutionize Education

In this video from the "Revolutions in Progress" session at Techonomy 2011 in Tucson, Ariz., Scott Cook, Founder and Chairman of Intuit, discusses how technology can revolutionize education in the same way it has transformed the music and entertainment industries. Digital technology has given musicians and artists a global reach that was unfathomable 100 years ago. Why not treat education in the same way, suggests Cook, and give students access to the best teachers and lessons available using new technologies? Roger McNamee, Managing Director of Elevation Partners, moderated the session.   More

Business Techonomy Events

Scott Cook on Scientific Experimentation in Business

In this video from the "Revolutions in Progress" session at Techonomy 2011, in Tucson, Ariz., Scott Cook, Founder and Chairman of Intuit, tells two stories about how scientific experimentation helped institutions find innovative solutions to complex problems. First, he describes how junior-level staff at his company created a text-message notification system for farmers in India to alert them about crop prices in nearby markets. Senior management initially doubted the tool's viability, but it went on to significantly improve the livelihood of over 400,000 Indian farmers. Second, he profiles the Chinese city of Shenzhen, where in the 1980s government officials allowed local markets, instead of communist government regulations, to dictate economic growth, providing a successful model for the rest of China.   More