Tag Index  /  Showing 61 - 75 of 75 results for “healthcare”

Business

Aetna CEO Bertolini: The Middle East Will Have Technologized Healthcare Before the U.S.

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini isn't afraid to speak his mind about the American healthcare system—even when that means underscoring its many failures. Bertolini talked with us at our recent Techonomy 2013 conference in Tucson, Ariz., about his views on U.S. healthcare's "recalcitrance" in accepting technology, and his hopes for changing that. "We've got a lot of really good technology in helping people survive diseases and get well again, but we haven't really focused on how we create a healthy human being and a better society," Bertolini said. This puts the U.S. at risk of falling behind, he added, speculating that countries in the Middle East will achieve better, more technologized healthcare systems before we do.   More

Internet of Things Partner Insights

True Stories of the Connected: Rural Healthcare in Northern Canada

The Internet of Everything is connecting people, process, data, and things every second of every day. In this episode of True Stories of the Connected, a Canadian doctor demonstrates the power of video and telehealth as he works to keep in contact with patients who are sometimes hundreds of miles away in a remote, tribal village. Amazing things happen when you connect the unconnected.   More

Government Healthcare Techonomy Events

A Health Insurance CEO Who’s Bringing Apps to Affordable Care

If you’ve lost faith in the government’s effort, Aetna’s Mark Bertolini could be the guy who gives you hope that the health insurance industry will indeed improve. A top exec with the healthcare giant since 2003, and at the helm since 2010, Bertolini exemplifies this week’s Tucson Techonomy conference theme: “Leaders must think more like technologists.”   More

Government

The Unhealthy Truth About Obamacare’s Contractors

On July 16 of this year, Sarah Kliff posted a prescient piece on the Washington Post's Wonkblog. The post, “Meet Serco, the private firm getting $1.2 billion to process your Obamacare application,” reported that 90 percent of Serco’s U.S. business is with the federal government and that the 25-year-old firm pretty much owes its existence to government contracting. She also noted that Serco's experience is in paper pushing, not healthcare. Nonetheless, Serco won a contract that will pay it $114 million in 2013 and that eye-popping number of $1.2 billion over the next five years.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Why Medical Research Does Big Data Wrong

Medicine is among many sectors waiting to be transformed by big data, we often hear. Conducting global studies of disease progression, integrating health records electronically, or analyzing petabyte-size banks of DNA sequence data should hasten the pace of medical discovery and lead to faster cures, the thinking goes. Not so fast, says computational biologist Michael Liebman. Health information is only as useful as the thought that went into gathering it. And Liebman says not enough thought is being applied to what data should be collected in healthcare.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Government

How the FDA’s Best Intentions Are Slowing the Genomics Revolution

Even as life-science companies pound out DNA sequencing improvements fast enough to make the computing industry look downright sedentary, the industry has been hindered in implementing its many advances so they can help patients in clinical settings. One major cause is the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which has asserted it will regulate these next-generation sequencing tools—but has not yet decided what will be regulated, how evaluations will take place, or when this oversight might kick in. With widespread uncertainty about the regulatory environment, companies developing genomic products for clinical use have been in limbo, and the venture capitalists who haven’t fled the space are tightening their belts.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Plans to Digitize Health Records Draw Skepticism

As the medical industry strives to integrate new technology to improve services and outcomes, venture capital funding for healthcare IT has tripled in the last three years, according to a story by WNYC's Mary Harris. Now, the federal government is preparing to pump $29 million into efforts to digitize healthcare records, with Obamacare ready to penalize providers who don't conform. But Ross Koppel, professor of sociology and medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has doubts about just how efficient and cost-effective the transition to digitized record-keeping will be.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Partner Insights

Healthcare of the Future: Connected and Mobile

The U.S. healthcare industry has come a long way in recent decades in using telecommunication services to improve patient care. Sick or injured people in remote areas such as the South Pole and on cruise ships can get evaluated by specialists thanks to advancements in technology. More doctors are adopting electronic health records to manage patient care, and more patients have access to those records via Internet-based systems.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Learning

Americans Give Computer Industry Top Favorability Rating

In a recent Gallup poll ranking overall public perception of a wide range of U.S. industries, the computer industry topped the list, with a net 64 percent positive response. The oil and gas industry ranked dead last, with a net -39 percent. No big surprise there. What is surprising—and refreshing—is that healthcare and education were the top two industries in improvement in positive ratings over last year.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

The Emerging Age of Techonomic Health: Self-tracking

Measuring ourselves with finer and finer detail is one of the rapidly-developing trends that suggests big changes afoot in how we will conceive of medical diagnosis and treatment. It should lead to more intelligent identification of what leads to various medical conditions, and throw much current medical research into a new light. In effect people will be able to begin to conduct p2p drug effectiveness tests, for one thing. This interesting article by Quentin Hardy in the New York Times touches on some of the implications.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Why Drug Development is Failing – and How to Fix It

The information technology industry has been living by Moore’s Law ever since 1965, when Intel co-founder Gordon Moore came up with the rule of thumb that the number of integrated circuits that can be placed inexpensively on an integrated circuit doubles every 18 months to two years. Contrast this with pharmaceuticals. In a paper published in a recent issue of Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, a wholly different development trajectory was posited, named “Eroom’s Law” (Moore’s Law spelled backwards): the cost of developing a new drug roughly doubles every nine years.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Mobile Health Apps Not So User-Friendly for Seniors

The rapid proliferation of mobile apps for health could hit a wall not usually associated with smart phones – they may be too hard to use by the patients that need them most. In a paper slated for presentation at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society annual meeting (Oct 22-25, Boston), researchers Laura A. Whitlock and Anne Collins McLaughlin of North Carolina State University warned that self-monitoring apps for diabetics are often not user-friendly for older patients.   More

Business Government

Why Techonomy?: A Manifesto

We believe in the potential of technology to make the world a happier, healthier, wealthier, and more peaceful place. Techonomy's name embodies our beliefs and our mission—it combines the words "technology" and "economy" because technology has become a central part of the economy in which we operate and the society in which we live. Today technology is inextricably entwined with just about every activity that humans undertake. We embrace that fact, and seek as a company to help the world take advantage of it.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Should the FDA Regulate Medical Apps?

At the Consumer Electronics Show last January, the seventh most popular gadget in a popular vote was a wireless glucose meter for diabetics, Telcare BGM.The device reads the glucose level in a drop of blood on a test strip and wirelessly transmits the results to an online database. Telcare’s gadget is just one of a whole raft of mobile health monitoring devices that have come to market during the past year or two. They range from blood pressure cuffs, pulse readers and other types of glucose meters, but all have one thing in common: they must connect to a smart phone.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Techonomy Events

Microsoft’s Craig Mundie on How Technology Can Reform Healthcare

In this session from Techonomy 2011, in Tuscon, Ariz., Techonomy's David Kirkpatrick talks to Craig Mundie, Chief Research and Strategy Officer at Microsoft, about how technology could reform the healthcare industry by giving healthcare providers access to huge amounts of data and statistics they currently don't have.   More