Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 20 of 22 results for “healthcare”

Digital Life Science

63 Companies Bent on Transforming Healthcare

When serial entrepreneurs Unity Stoakes and Steven Krein set out to build a digital health company, they quickly discovered that entrepreneurs in the healthcare sector face a unique set of challenges: daunting regulations, privacy issues, long sales cycles, and industry-wide resistance to change. So they shifted their attention to creating a platform that lets entrepreneurs innovate more easily in the healthcare industry. With support from former Time Warner CEO Jerry Levin and other high-powered investors including Esther Dyson and Mark Cuban, in partnership with Steve Case’s Startup America, and with applause from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Stoakes and Krein established StartUp Health in 2011. Stoakes describes the private company as part community, part knowledge base, and part academy offering a structured curriculum to help CEOs and founders, calling his audience “Healthcare Transformers.”   More

Life Science

Will Doctors Finally Accept Technology? Yes. Here’s How.

In 1968, the American health economist Victor R. Fuchs wrote in the New England Journal of Medicine: “Medical tradition emphasizes giving the best care that is technically possible; the only legitimate and explicitly recognized constraint is the state of the art.” Nearly half a century later his words still ring true. But the medical profession is often slow to adopt the state of the art. Witness the industry’s slow uptake of innovations such as telemedicine and electronic medical records. The 2009 Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act created financial incentives and penalties to encourage health care providers to implement electronic records by 2015. Still, providers are lagging.   More

Learning Life Science Video

Microsoft’s Mundie: Governments Impede Progress in Health and Education

With technology making transformative strides in business, communications, transportation, space, and beyond, why do two of society's most important sectors, healthcare and education, continue to lag so far behind? According to Microsoft's Craig Mundie—who as senior advisor to the CEO has spent years speaking with global leaders on the company's behalf—government may be the root of the problem. "The reason these two sectors have been resistant to change is because in almost every country [they] are controlled by the government," Mundie said in an interview at our Techonomy 2013 conference.   More

Business IoE Life Science Security & Privacy

People, Companies, and Trends: Techonomy’s 2013 Top Ten

As 2013 winds down, Techonomy takes a moment to look back on highlights from the year, especially those that portend—we think—the future. Our Top Ten list recognizes the people, companies, and ideas that embodied how technology is catalyzing change in business and society. Some of the individuals and organizations here were represented at our 2013 conferences, labs, and dinners, where we convene leaders to explore the biggest tech-driven challenges and opportunities. Some were featured in our expanding online editorial content.   More

Partner Insights

Your Car Will Take Your Blood Pressure

Customer research and societal trends suggest that there’s a strong business case for automakers to explore opportunities in health and wellness. Here’s what we at Ford have learned: While chronic illnesses are on the rise, the number of healthcare providers has remained relatively flat, which effectively limits patient access. For this reason and others, people of all ages and from all income groups are taking a more hands-on approach to their own health and wellness. More people now visit online health sites than go to the doctor’s office. Paralleling the increasing interest in health websites is an explosion of interest in mobile health solutions. These trends create a natural role for the automobile in the emerging digital health and wellness field.   More

Life Science Techonomy Tucson Video

Aetna CEO Embraces Alternative Healthcare

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini surprised many Techonomists at our conference in Tucson last month with his frank talk about alternative therapies and the need for the current health system to be “creatively destroyed.” Who would have thought the top man at one of the nation’s largest health insurance companies would be an advocate for craniosacral therapy and meditative chanting? Bertolini’s onstage interview with David Kirkpatrick focused mostly on his innovative approaches to apps and technology at the company. But in a later on-camera conversation, Bertolini described how his progressive personal health practices jibe with his company’s mission.   More

Life Science Partner Insights

Bedside Data Is Good for What Ails Us

Amid the clamor in Washington over the Affordable Care Act, the medical community is trying to stay focused on improving outcomes for today’s patients—and those who will require treatment tomorrow—by finding ways to strengthen the quality of care. Whether it’s the receptionist who confirms patient identities by making sure every file contains a photo, or the surgical team that uses an evidence-based checklist to avoid infections, improving care is an effort that benefits from widespread contributions.   More

Business

Aetna CEO Bertolini: The Middle East Will Have Technologized Healthcare Before the U.S.

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini isn't afraid to speak his mind about the American healthcare system—even when that means underscoring its many failures. Bertolini talked with us at our recent Techonomy 2013 conference in Tucson, Ariz., about his views on U.S. healthcare's "recalcitrance" in accepting technology, and his hopes for changing that. "We've got a lot of really good technology in helping people survive diseases and get well again, but we haven't really focused on how we create a healthy human being and a better society," Bertolini said. This puts the U.S. at risk of falling behind, he added, speculating that countries in the Middle East will achieve better, more technologized healthcare systems before we do.   More

Digital IoE Partner Insights

True Stories of the Connected: Rural Healthcare in Northern Canada

The Internet of Everything is connecting people, process, data, and things every second of every day. In this episode of True Stories of the Connected, a Canadian doctor demonstrates the power of video and telehealth as he works to keep in contact with patients who are sometimes hundreds of miles away in a remote, tribal village. Amazing things happen when you connect the unconnected.   More

Government Techonomy Tucson Video

A Health Insurance CEO Who’s Bringing Apps to Affordable Care

If you’ve lost faith in the government’s effort, Aetna’s Mark Bertolini could be the guy who gives you hope that the health insurance industry will indeed improve. A top exec with the healthcare giant since 2003, and at the helm since 2010, Bertolini exemplifies this week’s Tucson Techonomy conference theme: “Leaders must think more like technologists.”   More

Government

The Unhealthy Truth About Obamacare’s Contractors

On July 16 of this year, Sarah Kliff posted a prescient piece on the Washington Post's Wonkblog. The post, “Meet Serco, the private firm getting $1.2 billion to process your Obamacare application,” reported that 90 percent of Serco’s U.S. business is with the federal government and that the 25-year-old firm pretty much owes its existence to government contracting. She also noted that Serco's experience is in paper pushing, not healthcare. Nonetheless, Serco won a contract that will pay it $114 million in 2013 and that eye-popping number of $1.2 billion over the next five years.   More

Digital Life Science

Why Medical Research Does Big Data Wrong

Medicine is among many sectors waiting to be transformed by big data, we often hear. Conducting global studies of disease progression, integrating health records electronically, or analyzing petabyte-size banks of DNA sequence data should hasten the pace of medical discovery and lead to faster cures, the thinking goes. Not so fast, says computational biologist Michael Liebman. Health information is only as useful as the thought that went into gathering it. And Liebman says not enough thought is being applied to what data should be collected in healthcare.   More

Government Life Science

How the FDA’s Best Intentions Are Slowing the Genomics Revolution

Even as life-science companies pound out DNA sequencing improvements fast enough to make the computing industry look downright sedentary, the industry has been hindered in implementing its many advances so they can help patients in clinical settings. One major cause is the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which has asserted it will regulate these next-generation sequencing tools—but has not yet decided what will be regulated, how evaluations will take place, or when this oversight might kick in. With widespread uncertainty about the regulatory environment, companies developing genomic products for clinical use have been in limbo, and the venture capitalists who haven’t fled the space are tightening their belts.   More

Digital Life Science

Plans to Digitize Health Records Draw Skepticism

As the medical industry strives to integrate new technology to improve services and outcomes, venture capital funding for healthcare IT has tripled in the last three years, according to a story by WNYC's Mary Harris. Now, the federal government is preparing to pump $29 million into efforts to digitize healthcare records, with Obamacare ready to penalize providers who don't conform. But Ross Koppel, professor of sociology and medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has doubts about just how efficient and cost-effective the transition to digitized record-keeping will be.   More

Digital Life Science Partner Insights

Healthcare of the Future: Connected and Mobile

The U.S. healthcare industry has come a long way in recent decades in using telecommunication services to improve patient care. Sick or injured people in remote areas such as the South Pole and on cruise ships can get evaluated by specialists thanks to advancements in technology. More doctors are adopting electronic health records to manage patient care, and more patients have access to those records via Internet-based systems.   More

Digital Learning Life Science

Americans Give Computer Industry Top Favorability Rating

In a recent Gallup poll ranking overall public perception of a wide range of U.S. industries, the computer industry topped the list, with a net 64 percent positive response. The oil and gas industry ranked dead last, with a net -39 percent. No big surprise there. What is surprising—and refreshing—is that healthcare and education were the top two industries in improvement in positive ratings over last year.   More

Digital Life Science

The Emerging Age of Techonomic Health: Self-tracking

Measuring ourselves with finer and finer detail is one of the rapidly-developing trends that suggests big changes afoot in how we will conceive of medical diagnosis and treatment. It should lead to more intelligent identification of what leads to various medical conditions, and throw much current medical research into a new light. In effect people will be able to begin to conduct p2p drug effectiveness tests, for one thing. This interesting article by Quentin Hardy in the New York Times touches on some of the implications.   More

Life Science

Why Drug Development is Failing – and How to Fix It

The information technology industry has been living by Moore’s Law ever since 1965, when Intel co-founder Gordon Moore came up with the rule of thumb that the number of integrated circuits that can be placed inexpensively on an integrated circuit doubles every 18 months to two years. Contrast this with pharmaceuticals. In a paper published in a recent issue of Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, a wholly different development trajectory was posited, named “Eroom’s Law” (Moore’s Law spelled backwards): the cost of developing a new drug roughly doubles every nine years.   More

Life Science

Mobile Health Apps Not So User-Friendly for Seniors

The rapid proliferation of mobile apps for health could hit a wall not usually associated with smart phones – they may be too hard to use by the patients that need them most. In a paper slated for presentation at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society annual meeting (Oct 22-25, Boston), researchers Laura A. Whitlock and Anne Collins McLaughlin of North Carolina State University warned that self-monitoring apps for diabetics are often not user-friendly for older patients.   More

Business Digital Government

Why Techonomy?: A Manifesto

We believe in the potential of technology to make the world a happier, healthier, wealthier, and more peaceful place. Techonomy's name embodies our beliefs and our mission—it combines the words "technology" and "economy" because technology has become a central part of the economy in which we operate and the society in which we live. Today technology is inextricably entwined with just about every activity that humans undertake. We embrace that fact, and seek as a company to help the world take advantage of it.   More