Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 18 of 18 results for “government”

Community Insights Government Jobs

H1B Visas: Why They’re Broken and What we Can Do

The Trump administration may further restrict H1B work visas for technology workers. There are inherent problems with the current H1B system, but even more with the Trump proposal. We need to increase the minimum salary for H1B recipients, require employers that utilize them to take concrete actions to benefit American workers, and initiate a crash program to improve the tech skills of Americans.   More

Techonomy Events Video

New Rules I: Government Engagement

With tech changing business and societal norms, where does that leave government? Will it exist as we know it in 20 years? Can governments become as agile as businesses? What should evidence-based policy and data-driven government look like?   More

Techonomy Events Video

What Digital Society and Government Looks Like

A conversation between David Kirkpatrick and Marina Kaljurand, former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Estonia.   More

Government

To the Next Administration: Use Tech to Implement Every Program

We asked attendees at the upcoming Techonomy 2016 conference "What is the most important tech-related issue the incoming administration should tackle?" Tech leader and publisher Tim O'Reilly responded that the biggest challenge will be bringing a tech-centric approach to everything government does.   More

Global Tech Government Techonomy Events

How to Meet the World’s Grand Challenges

The best opportunities will come from creating the greatest impact on the biggest realms of human activity, like healthcare, food, water, energy, and education. How can businesses rise to the occasion and focus on the things that really matter? How can they best partner with governments and NGOs to implement the solutions? At the Techonomy 2014 conference in Half Moon Bay, Calif., Larry Brilliant of the Skoll Global Threats Fund, Pfizer's Geno Germano, Leila Janah of the Sama Group, and Ericsson's Rima Qureshi discuss applying tech tools to global challenges in a session moderated by The Economist's Matthew Bishop.   More

Government

Can Government Get a Better Grip on Tech?

"I'm very worried," says Neelie Kroes, who has served as a vice president of the European Commission since 2010. "The changes in technology nowadays are so fast that we have to change our mindset. This is my biggest frustration in the commission. It takes so much time for governments to know what is at stake. We can't consult ten times about issues like we did in former times." Kroes's concerns are widely shared, especially in the United States. Says Steve Case, who spends as much time as any major tech leader working with leaders of both parties in Washington: "The pace of innovation continues to accelerate and outstrip the ability of governments to react."   More

Analytics & Data Cities Techonomy Events

The Responsive City: Engaging Communities Through Data-Smart Governance

What is citizenship in the digital age? Policy experts Susan Crawford of Harvard University and Jennifer Bradley of the Brookings Institution discuss themes from Crawford’s new book about civic engagement, innovation, and the role of tech and the Internet for Detroit and other major cities.   More

Government

Can the Internet Make Politics More Collaborative?

So what is politics? Is it something we do once every couple of years—electing politicians who then are supposed to do stuff for us? Or is it a collaborative space, what the ancient Greeks called a "polis," where citizens go to improve their community? According to California Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom, we need to change our politics from what he calls a "referendum process" to something more collaborative. More polis, less petition, Newsom says. And that's where the Internet comes in.   More

Government Startup Culture

Should Politicians Be More Like Silicon Valley Entrepreneurs?

Should all politicians have to launch a startup before entering politics? That’s the question I asked California’s Lieutenant Governor, Gavin Newsom, at the latest Ericsson and AT&T hosted FutureCast event held at the AT&T Foundry in Palo Alto. Newsom, the author of "Citizenville," a kind of digital manifesto for 21st century networked politics, didn’t beat around the bush. “Yes," Newsom replied, sounding more like a startup guy than a career politician.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Learning

Microsoft’s Mundie: Governments Impede Progress in Health and Education

With technology making transformative strides in business, communications, transportation, space, and beyond, why do two of society's most important sectors, healthcare and education, continue to lag so far behind? According to Microsoft's Craig Mundie—who as senior advisor to the CEO has spent years speaking with global leaders on the company's behalf—government may be the root of the problem. "The reason these two sectors have been resistant to change is because in almost every country [they] are controlled by the government," Mundie said in an interview at our Techonomy 2013 conference.   More

Government Learning Partner Insights

Will All Schools Have Nanotechnology Labs?

Setting up high school students with atomic-force microscopes and optical profilers so they can study nanotechnology may seem like a science teacher’s dream, but it’s already happening in at least one school in the United States. And the amount of outside financial support received by Wheeling High School in Illinois to make the lab a reality, coupled with efforts to encourage teachers to emphasize the field, suggests that more labs may soon be cropping up. The focus on nanotech in Wheeling and elsewhere speaks to its potential.   More

Government Jobs

Smart Policies Can Restore a Thriving Middle Class

Labor freed up through technological change is supposed to find its way into other industries and increase the overall production of goods and services. We can produce more goods and services with the same amount of labor as before, and that should allow growth that makes us all better off. But does it make us all better off?Technology has advanced to the point where good, middle class jobs are being replaced rather than those on the lowest rung of the job ladder, and this is polarizing labor markets as the middle class is reduced in size.   More

Government Media & Marketing

Washington Post Sees the World “Switch”ing

Today the capital's leading media source (yes, still more important than Politico—after all, even people in New York read it) began publishing a regular blog about the intersection of technology and public policy, called (slightly opaquely) The Switch. This is, in our view, just the kind of techonomic movement that the world, and journalism, needs. As its first post explains, the site's goals will be "making the policy process accessible to technologists, while helping policy professionals gain a deeper understanding of technology."   More

Media & Marketing Security & Privacy

Snowden’s Exploits: Ripped from Prime Time’s “Scandal?”

I wonder if NSA leakmeister Edward Snowden watches the ABC prime-time drama “Scandal?” In particular, I'd be interested to know if he saw the episode entitled “Hunting Season” that originally aired last October, before Snowden went rogue. Why? Because that episode of the show—about the machinations of Olivia Pope, a gorgeous D.C. fixer extraordinaire—featured an NSA analyst who exposes a far-reaching domestic spying operation that permeates even the highest reaches of government.   More

Business Techonomy Events

Jack Dorsey on How Twitter Is Changing Business

In this conversation from the "21st Century Individuals vs. 20th Century Organization" session at Techonomy 2011 in Tucson, Ariz., Techonomy founder David Kirkpatrick talks to Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey about how social networks allow governments and businesses to track and respond to public reactions to policies, plans, and products. Dorsey emphasizes that networks like Twitter allow real-time tracking of public opinion, creating an immediate feedback loop between service providers, including governments, and their citizen-clients.   More

Government

Can Twitter Hold Out as Defender of Free Speech?

Twitter's chief lawyer, Alexander Macgillivray, believes that defending free speech is smart business. The company has been tenacious in its efforts to keep governments' prying eyes away from its users' content, and is still resisting a Manhattan court order to turn over the account activity of an Occupy protestor. "We value the reputation we have for defending and respecting the users' voice," says Macgillivray. But Twitter may soon face pressures, both financial and regulatory, that render such customer-facing idealism inoperable. Industry observers wonder how the company will navigate corporate responsibility in an Internet era.   More

Government Techonomy Events

Microsoft’s Craig Mundie on Changing Governance in Response to Technological Change

In the "Government in an Integrated World" session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Craig Mundie, Chief Research and Strategy Officer at Microsoft, discusses how he thinks governance will have to change to accommodate rapid technological and social change. The world is now so interdependent, he says, that a 'sick' country is felt by the rest of the world.   More

Business Government

Why Techonomy?: A Manifesto

We believe in the potential of technology to make the world a happier, healthier, wealthier, and more peaceful place. Techonomy's name embodies our beliefs and our mission—it combines the words "technology" and "economy" because technology has become a central part of the economy in which we operate and the society in which we live. Today technology is inextricably entwined with just about every activity that humans undertake. We embrace that fact, and seek as a company to help the world take advantage of it.   More