Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 20 of 46 results for “genomics”

Learning Science

Genetic Research That Helps Individuals Too

Preventing genetic diseases may sound like a dream. While ethical and regulatory challenges still remain within our system, companies like Color can provide responsible, compliant access to preventive genetic information for individuals to take action for their health future.   More

Analytics & Data Healthcare

New Efforts Promote Open Data in Science and Medicine

For American healthcare to improve, institutions must be able to share data. But they can’t. HIPAA and restrictive consent forms are among the challenges to data accessibility. But new approaches are emerging, and it may usher a new open data era.   More

Healthcare Techonomy Events

The Bioethics and Geopolitics of Genomics (at Techonomy Health)

New genomics technologies empower us to understand, manipulate, and even write the code of life. These technologies may produce medicine, biofuels, and bring major benefits to humanity. But they can also be used maliciously, for genetic discrimination or bioweapons. How do we ensure that they are used for good? This Techonomy Health session tackled these gnarly matters.   More

Government Healthcare

FDA Greenlights 23andMe and Opens New Era for Consumer DNA Info

It was a much-needed breakthrough when the FDA last week OK'd personal genomics company 23andMe selling genetic tests directly to consumers. In 2013 the agency had banned the startup from releasing disease-related information. Now we should finally see a consumer-driven marketplace for genomic data.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Islamic Bioethicists Debate Genomics at Qatar Health Summit

Many countries in the Middle East see exciting opportunities in genomics. Yet they also face challenging questions about reconciling it with local moral and cultural traditions. At a meeting in Qatar global healthcare leaders debated guidelines for a region where, for example, more than 20% of marriages are between first cousins.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

The Three-Parent Baby Is Not as Weird as You Think

People may have a "yuck response" when they hear about this new experimental technique for creating healthy babies. But it isn't as huge a leap from what we're used to as most reports would suggest, as Techonomy's genomics expert explains. Like a top medical source she quotes here, Salisbury will be continuing this conversation at Techonomy 2016 on November 10.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Beyond Human: Life Extension, Enhancement, and the Future

If artificial organs, miniature robots, and advanced medications could keep you healthy, would you want to live for hundreds of years? Author Eve Herold's new book "Beyond Human" argues that we might as well get used to these ideas, because they are inevitably coming. Reviewer Salisbury finds this an important overview of a rapidly-developing field of medical science, but is not yet ready to join the immortals herself.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Lawsuit Underscores Risk of Thinking Genetic Tests Authoritative

A recently filed lawsuit suggests trouble may be brewing for the new era of genomic testing. A mother claims an inaccurate test result contributed to the death of her young son, who had a mitochondrial disorder. But interpreting genetic tests remains as much art as science, which we will have to accept if this field is to get on its feet. It would be a shame if such tragedies hindered the innovations that will ultimately make genomic medicine more reliable.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Genomic Medicine Is Here. American Healthcare Isn’t Ready.

As many as half a million people have had their genomes sequenced. This data has already contributed to major medical success stories, but it is not yet clear that genomics can overcome the significant barriers that exist in traditional medicine to achieve its potential for American healthcare.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Dear Scientists: This Is Why People Hate You

Editors of the New England Journal of Medicine called scientists who make discoveries from publicly-shared data “research parasites.” Outrage ensued. Too many scientists believe they get a competitive advantage from data no one else has access to.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Government Healthcare

Why Obama Is Right about Cancer: Genomics

President Obama’s optimistic language about finally nearing a cure for cancer in the State of the Union comes as creative approaches are showing more promise than ever. Two major announcements highlight important new opportunities to diagnose and treat cancer—and both are only possible because of advances in genomics.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

5 Genomic Advances To Be Thankful For

With Thanksgiving approaching, Techonomy's resident champion of genomics details some things she's thankful for this year: Better Cancer Testing; Increased Data-Sharing Efforts; Scientists Who Push Boundaries (and Police Themselves Too); Living Foundries; and the FDA's Approval of the First DTC Genetic Test. She looks forward to more advances that will help regular consumers as programs like the federal Precision Medicine Initiative kick off.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

How Anybody Can Help Advance Genomic Medicine Now

Genomic medicine is on the horizon, and is likely to change healthcare. But there’s no shortage of challenges: regulations, data-sharing limits, funding, and lack of research participants, to name a few. But the biggest obstacle, surprisingly, is what's called "informed consent." That's what people need to agree to if they are to participate in research. And right now, each of us has a unique chance to minimize this obstacle by speaking out for a change.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare Society

Meeting My Genome: This Expensive Test Still Isn’t for Everyone

Earlier this year, I moderated a panel discussion at Techonomy Bio and asked speakers whether genome sequencing was ready for the average consumer. Their responses were split. Having now just gotten my own genome sequenced, I can say definitively: yes it’s ready, and no it isn’t.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Business

Can Hot Consumer Genomics Startup Helix Keep the FDA at Bay?

A new company launched by the market leader in DNA sequencing aims to bring genomics to the masses. Helix, kicked off on August 18 with a capital injection of more than $100 million, appears to embrace a direct-to-consumer approach that hasn’t been seen since pioneer 23andMe's ready-to-mail spit kits. Given the FDA’s firm pushback against 23andMe, though, does Helix has a bright future?   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Challenges for Genomics in the Age of Big Data

Last week, a group of respected researchers published a commentary about the coming data challenges in genomics. Comparing the projected growth of genomic data to three other sources considered among the most prolific data producers in the world—astronomy, Twitter, and YouTube—these scientists predict that by 2025, genomics could well represent the biggest of big data fields. With the raw data for each human genome taking up about 100 GB, we’re well on our way. Genomics only recently entered the big data realm, and we have major issues to address before it leapfrogs every other data-generating group.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare Opinion

Obama’s Not-So-Daring Precision Medicine Plan

For all the attention that President Obama’s precision medicine initiative has garnered in the weeks since he first mentioned it in his State of the Union address, you’d think the program was the next version of the Human Genome Project. But unlike that effort, which was a wildly audacious push to revolutionize biology and medicine, the modest new initiative—and its $215 million price tag—seems downright underwhelming.   More

Global Tech

Techonomy’s Most-Read Articles of 2014

As 2014 winds down, we look back on a productive and impactful year at Techonomy. Our events and publishing projects continued the dialogue about the centrality of technology in modern life and its potential to make the world better. Our editorial content is a growing channel. Our community of writers and videographers includes over 100 published contributors, including both professional journalists and thought leaders of industry, politics, and public service. Here's a look back at our five most-read Techonomy exclusives of the past twelve months.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Techonomy Events Video

The Next Revolution Will Be Biologized

Innovation in biology is accelerating at a rate that makes Moore’s Law look leisurely, throwing open doors to opportunities unimaginable. From food to fuel, manufacturing to medicine, business to buildings, what do the visionaries see just beyond the horizon? Stanford's Drew Endy, Brian Frezza of Emerald Therapeutics, Nancy J. Kelley of the New York Genome Center, and Floyd Romesberg of The Scripps Research Institute discuss the social and economic impact of biotech in this discussion, moderated by Marcus Wohlsen of WIRED, from the opening day of the Techonomy 2014 conference in Half Moon Bay, Calif.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Could Genomics Revive the Eugenics Movement?

An NYU exhibit about the history of the eugenics movement is more than a look back: it’s a timely reminder in the age of genomics that we have a social responsibility to consider not only what’s medically and scientifically possible, but also the potential social consequences. Otherwise we could start making decisions that future generations would find to be as shameful as 20th century eugenics appears to us.   More