Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 9 of 9 results for “genetics”

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

What’s Lurking in Your Genome?

It's still hard to know what to do about genetic news that's discovered about a patient during sequencing for another reason. A small percentage of such tests turn up disturbing findings. Some people want to know, some don't, but figuring out what to do often vexes doctors and researchers. Debate about how to handle this problem is growing within the genetics world.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

An Optimistic Gates Sees Promise in Genetics

At the annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics, Bill Gates told 7,000 geneticists that the world needs them to up the pace of innovation in order to solve our most pressing health challenges. Early childhood death, malaria, and pandemics are all dangers that may be mitigated by progress in this realm, he said, showing his characteristic optimism.   More

Science

CRISPR’s Unknown Cousin—The Promising Genetic Boost

Radical gene-editing technology CRISPR is in the news and rightly celebrated, but another form of genetic manipulation, known as "boosting," may reshape how we face a wide range of conditions. It shows dramatic promise for treating genetic diseases like hemophilia B and sickle cell disease, but could ultimately even help combat aging itself.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Global Tech

Nobel Laureates Tell Greenpeace to Ditch the GMO Conspiracies

On the list of misunderstood technology, genetically modified organisms might take the top spot. Now, more than 100 Nobel laureates have written an open letter asking the environmental group Greenpeace to reverse their stance on GMOs and promote potential breakthrough technologies like Vitamin A rich Golden Rice. Despite the pressure, Greenpeace remains skeptical.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Our Era of Preventive Genetic Screening: Brought to You in Part by Mary-Claire King

Two decades ago, Mary-Claire King made one of the most important contributions to modern healthcare when she discovered the first gene linked to breast cancer. Now, she’s trying to one-up herself. King, a genetics pioneer who won a major scientific award this week from the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation, has issued a call to change how we think about gene testing in an approach she believes will prevent cancer, not just catch it early. (And if you’ve never met King, the fact that she’s using her award to shed light on a serious public health need rather than to celebrate her own career tells you a little something about her character.)   More

Bio & Life Sciences

The Coming Era of Personal Genomics

If the idea of having everyone’s genome sequenced at birth brings images to your mind from "Blade Runner" or "Gattaca," you’re not alone. The tremendous potential of understanding and using genomic information from birth to death suggests motives both beneficent and nefarious. This path is quite realistic, given the galloping state of modern genomic science. That’s one reason genomics will loom large at our upcoming Techonomy Bio conference in Mountain View, Calif., on June 17. In this article we conduct a Techonomy thought exercise: envisioning a world in which everyone has his or her genome sequenced at birth (or, in some cases, even earlier).   More

Bio & Life Sciences

NYU Scientists Lead Synthetic Chromosome Breakthrough

Another huge milestone has been reached in synthetic biology. Scientists have created a working chromosome and inserted it into a living cell. The cell continued to act normally—what scientists consider a key measure of success. While chromosomes have already been created for bacteria, accomplishing the feat with a brewer's yeast cell, a more complex organism, is a major accomplishment. Jeff Boeke, director of NYU's Institute for System's Genetics and the leader of the research team, was quoted as saying, "We have made of 50,000 changes to the DNA code in the chromosome and our yeast is still alive. That is remarkable… It is the most extensively altered chromosome ever built." The potential efficiencies created by these synthetic strains of yeast open doors to remarkable medical and biofuel opportunities, to name just a couple.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Hope Seen in Chromosome Therapy for Down Syndrome

There have been any number of approaches to managing Down syndrome or reducing its symptoms. But developmental biologist Jeanne Lawrence and her team at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have taken a different tack, borrowing a biological mechanism honed by thousands of years of evolution and creatively applying it to try to nip Down syndrome in the bud.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

How “Cloud” Services Democratize DNA Sequencing

DNAnexus is providing genomic storage and analysis tools in the cloud. Techonomy Contributing Editor Adrienne Burke spoke with the company's leadership recently about what their innovative approach to managing this unique brand of big data means to scientific research, personalized medicine, and individuals who’ve had their DNA sequenced.   More