Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 20 of 27 results for “Ericsson”

Business

What’s Missing at CES 2017?

David Kirkpatrick, Founder and CEO of Techonomy, chats with Dodi Axelson at CES 2017.   More

Internet of Things Mobile Transportation

The Next Industries to Be Transformed by Tech: Shipping and Mining

Mining and shipping are industries thus far almost wholly unreconstructed by mobile tech. But soon, remote-control earthmovers, sensor-connected containers, and network-linked augmented reality goggles will change both unalterably. The Internet of Things (IoT) is going underground and out to sea.   More

Global Tech

CES Afterthoughts from Roger Kay

Entire armies of reporters did an amazing job of capturing the insanity of the CES show in all its glory. Instead, here are a few highlights that struck me, my moments of epiphany. There were three, maybe four. Everyone at the show tries to stand out one way or another, but it’s pretty difficult. There were 170,000 people all seeking attention. I was struck especially by TVs from Samsung and a compelling talk by Ericsson's Hans Vestberg.   More

5G Business

Ericsson CEO Hans Vestberg on the Next Phase in Wireless–5G

What comes after so-called 4G wireless, today’s highest-bandwidth systems (sometimes called LTE)? Even though only a small portion of smartphone users in a few countries so far have 4G, Ericsson, one of the telecoms industry’s leading tech providers, is already deep into planning the next phase. These 5G systems will differ dramatically from those today, […]   More

Business Video

When Everything Gets Connected, How Does it Transform the System?

Hans Vestberg, CEO of Ericsson, which makes much of the world’s wireless infrastructure, sees an even more connected world in our future. In this short excerpt of a conversation with Techonomy’s David Kirkpatrick, he explains that as more and more of our devices are online and interacting, and as mobile broadband dovetails with cloud services, […]   More

Arts & Culture

The Intimacy and Authenticity of Online Filmmaking

The idea that the Internet has democratized moviemaking has become one of the most repeated truisms of the digital age. But what, exactly, does the ability of everyone to post video on popular networks like YouTube, Daily Motion, and Vimeo mean to the filmmaker herself? According to the noted filmmaker Tiffany Shlain, it means that the art of intimacy and authenticity become central to the creative product. "I think there is an intimacy with the way people are experiencing it," Shlain said about online filmmaking at a recent Ericsson and AT&T hosted FutureCast. The event helped launch her latest short movie, "The Science of Character."   More

Arts & Culture

Will Movies Move to the Cloud?

The idea of cloud computing these days is, of course, hardly radical. But noted film maker Tiffany Shlain has a notion of what she calls "cloud filmmaking" that is considerably different than what people typically mean when they say "cloud." For her, making movies in the cloud means curating the self-made content (usually selfies) of others to produce her own work. But isn't that crowd-sourced movie making? Not according to Shlain. "I don't like the idea of crowd sourcing.... I get nervous in crowds." Shlain told "Digital Vertigo" author Andrew Keen at a recent Ericsson and AT&T hosted FutureCast event to launch her latest short movie, "The Science of Character."   More

Partner Insights

Making Sense of the Mainframe, 50 Years Later

Computing has changed a lot in the last 50 years, but one 50-year-old technology remains significant. The durability of the mainframe illustrates the maxim that new technologies don't usually replace old ones, but rather coexist alongside them. When the IBM System 360 debuted on April 7, 1964, it was, in effect, the first general-purpose computer of any type. We don't call today's app-laden smartphones mainframes as we use them for everything from texting to watching Netflix movies, but they are the descendants of the 360. Meanwhile, real mainframes that use the basic architecture of the 360 are still essential in business. IBM's current-generation zEnterprise systems have extraordinary capabilities, and can manage 1.1 million transactions per second.   More

Business

Are the Smart Machines Taking Over?

At CES this year, all the talk was about smart machines: smart cars, smart glasses, and, of course, smartphones. But should we be scared of these smart machines? Are they about to become too smart—so smart, indeed, that they are calling the shots? This was one of the most interesting audience questions at a keynote panel I moderated featuring Ericsson CEO Hans Vestberg, Qualcomm CEO Dr. Paul Jacobs and AT&T’s SVP of Network Operations John Donovan. Interestingly enough, the panelists seemed less afraid of our networked future than the audience.   More

Business

Spectrum, Spectrum, Spectrum: The Three Key Issues in The Future of Mobile Technology

At CES this year, I moderated a keynote panel featuring Ericsson CEO Hans Vestberg, Qualcomm CEO Dr. Paul Jacobs, and AT&T’s SVP of Network Operations John Donovan. And the CES audience was pretty impressive too—including such luminaries as FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel. After the formal discussion, Rosenworcel was the first to ask the panelists a question. “Do we have enough spectrum for mobile commercial use?” she asked. “And if we don’t, how can technologies like small cells help us use it more efficiently?” “Spectrum is the life blood of the industry” Donovan said, and “the oxygen for commerce.”   More

Internet of Things

What Is the Future of Our Networked Society?

Today, the smartphone is ubiquitous. But as the Internet of Things becomes more and more of a reality, what is the future of the phone? And, in the not too distant future, will it be replaced as our central operating device by such intelligent networked objects as smart clothing, smart glasses, and smart cars? At CES this year, I moderated a keynote panel featuring Ericsson CEO Hans Vestberg, Qualcomm CEO Dr. Paul Jacobs and AT&T’s SVP of Network Operations John Donovan. And each of them spoke about their vision of a networked world in ten years time.   More

Business Mobile

Is Mobile Dead?

Is mobile redundant? No, not the technology. But has word “mobile” become redundant? After all, mobile is so ubiquitous these days that it seems as if everything we talk about in tech—from apps to devices to the networks themselves—is inevitably “mobile.” And who better to ask about the ubiquity of mobile technology than the CEOs of Ericsson and Qualcomm and the SVP of Network Operations at AT&T. I had the great fortune at CES this year to moderate a keynote panel featuring Hans Vestberg of Ericsson, Dr. Paul Jacobs of Qualcomm and John Donovan of AT&T. And this was the first question that I asked this all-star panel.   More

Government

Obama: From Bottom-Up Candidate to Top-Down President

Like so many of us, California's Lieutenant Governor, Gavin Newsom was inspired by Barack Obama's Internet-driven 2008 Presidential campaign. Indeed, Newsom was so inspired by a campaign run by "35,000 self-organizing communities" that he wrote a book called "Citizenville," which sees all change as beginning from the bottom up. But Newsom has fallen out of love with Barack Obama. As he told me at our latest Ericsson and AT&T hosted FutureCast event at the AT&T Foundry in Palo Alto, the "bottom-up candidate" has turned into the "top-down President." Obama isn't the Internet President, Newsom insists. By transitioning from change.gov to whitehouse.gov, he's let his Internet base down.   More

Security & Privacy

Could Privacy Become a New Form of Currency?

It's becoming increasingly clear that the latest digital technology is killing privacy. As Robert Scoble said at our latest Ericsson and AT&T hosted FutureCast event at the AT&T Foundry in Palo Alto, the future will be dominated by surveillance technologies like sensors, wearable computing, and location data. So, I asked California's Lieutenant Governor, Gavin Newsom what, exactly, does the end of privacy mean from the perspective of a politician? Newsom was refreshingly blunt. "We never had it," he replied. "So it's like welcome to my world."   More

Government

Can the Internet Make Politics More Collaborative?

So what is politics? Is it something we do once every couple of years—electing politicians who then are supposed to do stuff for us? Or is it a collaborative space, what the ancient Greeks called a "polis," where citizens go to improve their community? According to California Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom, we need to change our politics from what he calls a "referendum process" to something more collaborative. More polis, less petition, Newsom says. And that's where the Internet comes in.   More

Startup Culture

Why Do People Still Come to Silicon Valley?

The traffic is terrible, the real-estate ridiculously expensive, the public schools aren’t that great and the gulf between rich and poor is increasingly pronounced. So why do people still come to Silicon Valley? That’s the question we asked participants at a recent Ericsson and AT&T Foundry hosted FutureCast event that focused on innovation in Silicon Valley. The answers from our international audience were varied, instructive and entertaining.   More

Startup Culture

Can Silicon Valley Survive?

Silicon Valley hasn’t had one of its best years. There are more and more complaints about inequality, discrimination against women and minorities, lack of innovation and a focus on short-term economic gain. The Valley, veterans say, isn’t what it used to be. And, they go on, if Silicon Valley is to survive, it has to reinvent itself in an increasingly competitive global economy where most of the rest of the world is trying to emulate the Valley. So, I asked David Kirkpatrick, when I interviewed him at an Ericsson and AT&T Foundry hosted FutureCast event that focused on the future of innovation, how exactly can Silicon Valley reinvent itself?   More

Startup Culture

Are the Best and Brightest Still Coming to Silicon Valley?

Are the smartest entrepreneurs and technologists still attracted to Silicon Valley? Does the Valley still pull in the best and brightest from around the world? According to David Kirkpatrick, who I interviewed at an Ericsson and AT&T Foundry hosted FutureCast event, the answer may well be no. Kirkpatrick tells the story of a remarkably talented Chinese guy he met in Beijing recently who had read his book, “The Facebook Effect,” five times. “I was just amazed I stumbled across that in Beijing,” he told me. This guy, Kirkpatrick explained, was running a 20-person Beijing startup just focused on making Facebook games.   More

Startup Culture

Is Silicon Valley the Center of the Innovation Universe?

Silicon Valley takes it for granted that it’s the center of the innovation universe. But that, of course, is a weakness—which points to the often parochial and inward looking nature of many Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and investors. So is Silicon Valley really the center of the innovation universe? That’s the question we asked an invitation-only crowd who came to the AT&T Foundry in Palo Alto to hear me interview David Kirkpatrick at the Ericsson and AT&T hosted FutureCast event.   More

Partner Insights Techonomy Events

Ericsson: Mobility Report Tracks Global Interconnectedness

This report is more than a bunch of stats about cellphones. It is a window into the transformation of our planet. The growing interconnectedness of the human race is a historic turn. We are entering an era of inclusiveness, in which the vast billions of humanity, most of them heretofore sequestered in their villages away from progress, from health, from education and information, and critically, from earning power, are suddenly being thrust into the thick of the global economy.   More