Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results for “engineering”

Learning

A Holiday Gift That Helps You Navigate an Electronic World

Thirty-one-year-old Ayah Bdeir wants to inspire a new generation of innovators, and she has the building blocks to do it—literally. Bdeir is CEO and founder of littleBits, a company that sells an electronic toolkit that can teach complex engineering concepts to kids and adults in a fun and simple way. LittleBits users get access to an open-source library of small electronic modules resembling LEGO pieces that snap together with tiny magnets to create fully-functioning devices. Each “bit” has a specific function—it might create light or sound, have a sensor or house a motor—allowing users to create anything from a flashlight to a fully operational robot.   More

Digital Learning

In Chicago, It’s Hot to Study How People Interact Online

People who build technology want you to have the most simple—and emotionally satisfying—experience possible. That's why more and more students are studying UX, or user experience, design. There are many subtleties in how understanding how users interact with technology and how to create user-friendly products. The field of UX design is often described as how and why things work. And Chicago is becoming a hotbed for studying it.   More

Business Management

New Google Engineering Director, Kurzweil to Turn Visions to Reality

Futurist, artificial intelligence pioneer, and author Ray Kurzweil announced Friday that he will start a new job on Monday, Dec. 17, as Director of Engineering for Google. The inventor says he will assist the company with tough computer science problems to turn "unrealistic" visions into reality.   More

Learning Manufacturing

From Dinosaur Bones to Cookies, 3D Printing Expands in Colleges

Colleges are finding more uses for 3D printing, from art students creating sculptures of futuristic animals, to engineering students developing zero gravity fuel storage, to biology professors replicating dinosaur bones. All disciplines have the potential to benefit from 3D printing, the Chronicle of Higher Education reports, especially as the technology becomes more sophisticated and less expensive. Many professors are supporters of controversial open-source 3D printers, an affordable do-it-yourself approach where printers are designed from online instructions based on expired patents. Despite impending patent disputes, proponents see open-source 3D printers as a way to bring the technology to the masses, offer more experimentation in the classroom, and attract younger students to STEM fields. One university class even printed 8,000 edible cookies for visiting high-school students—a huge hit for the potential engineers of the future.   More