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Learning Partner Insights Techonomy Events

Why Gaming Is Working in Higher Ed

As a planet, we spend 7 billion hours a week playing video and computer games, and about 5 million of us are playing an average of 45 hours a week. It is no surprise that educators are taking a serious look at gaming theory and “badging” in the classroom to increase student engagement and motivation. Top tech institutions such as MIT acknowledge that the persistence, risk-taking, attention to detail, and problem solving commonly observed among game players are all “behaviors that would be regularly demonstrated at school.”   More

Learning

STEM Knowledge an Increasing Necessity for All Workers

STEM skills aren't just for job-hunters in tech fields. As reported in SmartPlanet, Dr. Richard Larson of MIT believes that STEM literacy goes far deeper than understanding numbers, formulas, and gadgetry.   More

Energy & Green Tech Learning

Augmented Reality Intensifies Nature on Middle School Field Trips

The annual field trip to the local pond has gone high-tech for some Massachusetts and New York middle-school students. Harvard education researchers are giving the kids smartphones loaded with augmented reality software to see how the technology changes the way they explore of local environments.   More

Jobs

Skills Gap Widening on Two Fronts, Deloitte Team Concludes

One interpretation of the skills gap is that the knowledge acquired to earn a college degree is becoming obsolete faster than ever before. But, according to research by William D. Eggers, John Hagel, and Owen Sanderson of Deloitte, workers in fields that require a college education aren't the only ones whose career opportunities are becoming harder to define. So-called blue-collar worker now also have to keep up with rapidly evolving technology, as new jobs require skills like fluency in CAD blueprints or LEED certification requirements.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Learning

Americans Give Computer Industry Top Favorability Rating

In a recent Gallup poll ranking overall public perception of a wide range of U.S. industries, the computer industry topped the list, with a net 64 percent positive response. The oil and gas industry ranked dead last, with a net -39 percent. No big surprise there. What is surprising—and refreshing—is that healthcare and education were the top two industries in improvement in positive ratings over last year.   More

Jobs

Skills Gap May Be Narrower than Feared

The recession has amplified discussion about the skills gap, accompanied by speculation that 21st century jobs will require college degrees and advanced skills training still inaccessible to many. This compounds worries about a growing barrier to entry into America's middle class. But, as reported by Jeff Tyler on American Public Radio's Marketplace, a study from Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce concludes that there are 29 million openings for jobs that pay between $35,000 and $72,000 but don't require a bachelor's degree. The surprising finding should be welcome news in much of the country, with the possible exception of New York City, where $35,000 hardly translates into a middle-class lifestyle.   More

Learning

Schools Let Students Bring Their Own Devices, Then Struggle to Keep Up

Walk through one of the high schools in the Katy Independent School District in Texas and you’ll see students staring at cell phones, headphones in their ears and fingers on their keypads. On every table in the lunchroom is a mobile or wireless device. Peek into a classroom and you’ll find students using laptops, tablets, and smartphones to research assignments. Last year, for the first time, all K-12 Katy students were allowed to bring their own devices to school, and the move was a predictable hit, says Lenny Schad, chief technology officer of the district.   More

Learning

Digital Teaching Promises to Improve Grades

Technology in the classroom is not about putting a computer on everybody’s desk anymore. It’s about getting the right software so students can absorb the information universities and schools are teaching. Given all the technology available, increasingly students may find it tough to explain why they can’t maintain a 4.0 grade point average.   More

Business Government

Why Techonomy?: A Manifesto

We believe in the potential of technology to make the world a happier, healthier, wealthier, and more peaceful place. Techonomy's name embodies our beliefs and our mission—it combines the words "technology" and "economy" because technology has become a central part of the economy in which we operate and the society in which we live. Today technology is inextricably entwined with just about every activity that humans undertake. We embrace that fact, and seek as a company to help the world take advantage of it.   More

Business Government Techonomy Events

Steve Forbes on Monetary Policy, Healthcare, and Education

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Steve Forbes, Chairman and Editor-in-Chief of Forbes Media, says reforming monetary policy, healthcare, and education will dramatically improve the US economy.   More

Learning Techonomy Events

Scott Cook on How Technology Can Revolutionize Education

In this video from the "Revolutions in Progress" session at Techonomy 2011 in Tucson, Ariz., Scott Cook, Founder and Chairman of Intuit, discusses how technology can revolutionize education in the same way it has transformed the music and entertainment industries. Digital technology has given musicians and artists a global reach that was unfathomable 100 years ago. Why not treat education in the same way, suggests Cook, and give students access to the best teachers and lessons available using new technologies? Roger McNamee, Managing Director of Elevation Partners, moderated the session.   More