Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results for “Ebola”

Healthcare

Infectious Diseases Really Are Out to Get You

Infectious disease outbreaks are occurring more often and with more complex infection patterns, making them harder to treat. While this is a very scary reality, new approaches to diagnosis, treatment and preparation for epidemics hold promise, reported top scientists at a recent conference called Advances in Genome Biology and Technology.   More

Healthcare

Fixing Our Healthcare Disconnect

In 2014, I saw countless examples of disconnectedness in healthcare. There was the first known Ebola victim in the U.S., Thomas Eric Duncan, whose recent travel to West Africa was overlooked in his hospital’s electronic health record system. There was the revelation that tens of thousands of veterans were waiting months or longer for care at the VA. And we’re just getting news that, beginning in 2015, nearly 260,000 doctors will face Medicare reimbursement penalties for their failure to go digital. Healthcare is failing to connect care teams to timely clinical information; failing to connect and engage patients in their own care; and failing to connect healthcare providers to innovation and financial results.   More

Global Tech

Texting to Stop Ebola: African Telecoms Launch SMS Fundraiser

In the fight against Ebola, African telecoms are asking cell phone users to text to save lives. Partnering with the African Union Commission, 41 telecommunications companies across the continent have launched the “United Against Ebola” campaign, an SMS initiative that raises money from every user who texts “Stop Ebola” to 7979. Rwanda is one of the latest countries to join the campaign, which began Dec. 1 and runs through February 2015.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Could DNA Tools Help Manage Ebola?

Recent innovations in DNA analysis have given scientists and epidemiologists new ways to track and treat outbreaks, and many of these tools are already being deployed in the battle against Ebola and other diseases. Technologies at work today, as well as those expected in the years to come, will be of real utility in helping the biomedical community understand these pathogens better, provide a real-time warning system about outbreaks, and trace their source and spread over time.   More