Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 20 of 24 results for “Techonomy Detroit”

Cities Techonomy Events

How Tech Is Enhancing Citizen-Government Relationships in Cities

Cities enabled by sensors, mobile technologies, cameras, and big data will be better places to live, according to Harvard Law School Professor Susan Crawford’s new book, “The Responsive City: Engaging Communities Through Data-Smart Governance,” coauthored with Harvard Kennedy School’s Stephen Goldsmith. In contrast to the notion that tech will further enable the surveillance state or nefarious uses of data in cities, such as redlining in Detroit and Philadelphia, Crawford’s is an optimistic outlook. At Techonomy Detroit this week, Crawford, who also co-directs Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, discussed with the Brookings Institution's Jennifer Bradley various ways tech is enhancing urban living standards.   More

Business Techonomy Events

Detroit CIO Beth Niblock Interviews Jack Dorsey, Founder of Twitter and Square

At our Sept. 16 Techonomy Detroit conference, Beth Niblock, Detroit's first CIO, interviewed Jack Dorsey of Twitter and Square about how tech tools can help small merchants thrive in communities like Detroit.   More

Manufacturing

China’s Auto Export Drive Sputters in Detroit

A slew of year-end news about China’s auto industry is shining a spotlight on the tough times that domestic car makers are facing not only at home but also abroad as they grapple with tough competition and other market factors. Domestic nameplates like Geely, Chery, and BYD have steadily lost share in their home market over the last few years to big foreign names like GM and Volkswagen, but posted strong export gains as they looked to overseas markets to partly offset the declines at home. But now even the export picture is looking bleak, with the latest word that no Chinese car makers will attend the industry-leading North American International Auto Show in Detroit this week.   More

Cities

Pittsburgh and Detroit: From Industry to Innovation

Cathy Lewis Long, founding executive director of The Sprout Fund in Pittsburgh, met with us at our Techonomy Detroit conference to talk about the Steel City and how it compares with the Motor City. Both places, she said, have a "spirit and legacy of innovation" and a special way of sneaking up on people. "[Detroit's| so exciting and it's that same 'ah-ha!' moment that people get when they come to Pittsburgh," she said. Both cities, too, are heavily focused on reimagining their futures. "Detroit is at a palpable moment now to propel forward," Lewis Long said.   More

Cities

Are Cities Engines for Smart Growth?

Kids today would rather be mayor than president, Thomas L. Friedman writes in a recent column. “The country looks so much better from the bottom up—from its major metropolitan areas—than from the top down,” he writes, pointing to the partisanship and inefficiencies in federal and state legislatures. Cities, therefore, are the laboratories and engines of our economy—a conclusion reached in a new book by Brookings Institution scholars Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley called “The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy.”   More

Business Jobs

Motor City Is Building Apps … But Will Developers Come?

Calling all app developers: Looking for the next great career opportunity? The chance to get creative on a completely different platform? There’s just one catch: You’ll need to relocate to (drumbeat, please) Detroit. “Detroit is suddenly hungry for . . . software developers and information technology specialists who can create applications for the next generation of connected vehicles,” writes Jaclyn Trop in the New York Times, noting the Michigan’s Department of Labor projection that app developer jobs will grow 36.9 percent from 2010 levels.   More

Business

7.2 Square Miles: The Data Behind Detroit’s Resurgence

A new report produced by a consortium of Detroit-based organizations uses a wide range of analytics to document the revitalization of the 7.2 square miles that comprise the city's Greater Downtown area. Drawn from local surveys and data provided by the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, among other sources, the report details population and tourism figures, business distribution, and demographics on income, housing, ethnicity, and education. Some of the findings hint at the dynamics behind Detroit's resurgence.   More

Manufacturing

How the “Connected Car” Will Change Detroit

As we approach a future of electronic, connected, and networked automobiles, will Detroit’s auto industry also evolve? Cars are relying more heavily on electronics (the market for electronic systems is expected to grow from $170 billion in 2011 to $263 billion in 2016), and R&D is adapting appropriately, SmartPlanet reports. The “connected car” of the future will feature entertainment and web connectivity, fuel economy features, and vehicle safety and efficiency improvements—including, for instance, the capability for cars to respond to changes in the environment and act automatically to protect their occupants.   More

Startup Culture

Young Detroit Entrepreneurs Need Mentorship, Says Jack Dorsey

Jack Dorsey, the founder of Twitter and Square, talked to MLive.com about the future of Detroit after speaking at last week’s Techonomy Detroit conference. Dorsey said that Detroit has reached a turning point, and mentorship is essential for the city’s burgeoning tech scene. While Detroit doesn’t have the experience level of Silicon Valley, local leaders like Dan Gilbert should spend time with young entrepreneurs because it “passes along the torch in ways nothing else can,” Dorsey said. “I think this conference is a start.… Actually seeing someone in the flesh, seeing them on stage and seeing them talk about what they did well, what they did poorly, and what they’re trying to do better at.” Although Detroit has seen an increase in homegrown tech startups, if the city is to truly overcome its formidable economic and structural challenges it needs strong entrepreneurial leadership. Perhaps it will come from someone like Dorsey—who doesn't hide his aspiration to one day transition from tech entrepreneur to mayor of New York City.   More

Learning

Broadband Access Increases Test Scores in Michigan

A Connect Michigan study has found that broadband availability in school increases test scores, CBS Detroit reports. As e-learning becomes an essential part of learning, increased access to broadband allows for critical online interaction, both in and out of the classroom. Broadband availability increases math and reading proficiency scores for students in grades 3 through 8, the study found, as well as the number of students who meet ACT college readiness benchmarks.   More

Energy & Green Tech Manufacturing

Techonomy Detroit in the News: Was Tim Draper Wrong About Detroit’s Electric Car Future?

At Techonomy Detroit last week, venture capitalist Tim Draper had some harsh words for the local crowd. Detroit automakers have lost the electric-car battle to Tesla Motors, he said, and the only hope for the Big Three is to make something as innovative as a flying car. But Todd Woody at Forbes says Draper was wrong: “The electric car battle has only begun and if the objective is to win the war against fossil fuels then Tesla needs Detroit, Tokyo and Munich to join forces and sell as many cars as possible."   More

Business Cities

Why Techonomy Detroit?

People keep asking, "Why are you doing a Techonomy conference in Detroit?" We're known for our invite-only annual retreat in the desert near Tucson. So why, you may wonder, is our first one-day event in a gritty, depressed, financially-troubled city that seems well past its glory?   More

Business

The Detroit News Gets Behind the Techonomy Detroit Idea

Columnist Daniel Howes today explains as only a savvy local can why technology and entrepreneurship may be the best and only hope for Detroit's ravaged economy and jobs landscape. His column is a gratifying response to our months of work preparing the conference that begins tomorrow. We really do believe that in a technologizing time, the opportunities for rapid transformation are gigantic and real. But we also believe that it will not happen automaticallly. The changes that need to happen will require business, government, and civic leaders to actively embrace the opportunities presented by technology's headlong progress. We are here in Detroit because we hope it happens. Tomorrow's conference is our contribution.   More

Cities

Is Detroit the Next Berlin?

After the fall of the Wall in 1989, Berlin had very cheap housing and industrial space, some in spectacularly grand old buildings. Years of division—with repressive communist rule on one side of town and isolation and economic stagnation on the other—had left the city depressed and underpopulated. Reunification initially only made things worse, as uncompetitive Eastern-side state-owned factories closed en masse.   More

Startup Culture

An App that Tells What’s in Your Future

In the lead up to Techonomy Detroit, we are profiling tech startups driving the city’s re-emergence as a center of innovation. UpTo, a mobile application startup in the Detroit area, is garnering serious attention. The app is a social calendar that lets users share upcoming events with groups of friends, family, and co-workers. Techonomy contributor Tiffany Huang spoke with Greg Schwartz, UpTo’s CEO, about how his company is part of Detroit’s renewal as a city of the future.   More

Manufacturing

How the U.S. Can Reinvent Manufacturing

‘Manufacturing 2.0’ is a radical shift already underway, and many key elements are taking shape. As technologies and business models evolve, we have an opportunity in the US to create and own the future of manufacturing. That means the opportunity for a resurgence of US manufacturing, creating big changes in the economy and revitalizing US cities across the country.   More

Startup Culture

Detroit Startup Asks (and Names Itself), Are You a Human?

In anticipation of the Techonomy Detroit conference on September 12, we’re profiling six tech startups that are driving that city’s re-emergence as a center of innovation. Are You A Human? offers an alternative to CAPTCHAs, those fuzzy letter/number combinations that web shoppers are often required to decipher before buying online. Because automated software tools are increasingly able to bypass CAPTCHAs, and because users are increasingly annoyed by them, Are You A Human? has turned human authentication into a game with its quick, fun PlayThru challenges.   More

Business

Ready to Rumble at Techonomy Detroit!

Tim Smith of Skidmore Studio says that he's so excited to speak at Techonomy Detroit, he's already picking out what shoes to wear. More importantly, he's already formulating his slant on the session he'll appear in, "Is Detroit the Next Berlin?" moderated by Justin Fox of the Harvard Business Review. Smith questions the premise of using the success or failure of other cities as a benchmark for what we should expect from Detroit. Detroit, he believes, is incomparable, and must strive to define success on its own terms. Smith unabashedly proclaims that he'll debate anyone who argues otherwise.   More

Startup Culture

FlockTAG’s Loyalty Card Makes Your Wallet Lighter … in a Good Way

In anticipation of the September 12 Techonomy Detroit conference on, we’re profiling six Detroit tech startups driving the city’s re-emergence as a center of innovation. FlockTAG, a universal, NFC-powered loyalty card and mobile application, is one of the latest Detroit area tech startups. It gives consumers a centralized loyalty card for a wide variety of transactions with merchants, and serves as a marketing tool for independent business owners. I spoke with FlockTAG’s co-founder Adrian Fortino about his company and why it’s following Facebook's model by building first at universities.   More

Startup Culture

Picketreport.com’s Brian Bandemer: How Detroit Tech Hustles Harder

PicketReport.com, a website that aggregates information about neighborhoods and towns, is one of the latest tech startups in the Detroit area to garner attention. The site serves people relocating to unfamiliar areas, curating information about schools, crime, and income levels. It even pinpoints the nearest grocery stores and cafes. I spoke with Brian Bandemer, Picketreport.com’s co-founder and COO, about how his company is part of Detroit’s renewal.   More