Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results for “CRISPR”

Society The Internet

Whatever Happened to the Internet’s Promise?

Idealism helped build a massive global movement of free culture and the net. It may still offer a powerful outline of cyberspace governance: an equitable and enlightened arena, a benign ecosystem that interweaves people and machines. Unfortunately we’re not even close to that today. But it's not too late to retrieve that vision.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Contradictions Abound in Public Opinions about Genetics

People are so opposed to GMOs that such food has often been banned, though studies find zero evidence it harms people. But paradoxically, when it comes to editing human genomes, many are eager to press forward. Yet here scientists themselves mostly call for caution, because little is known about long-term ramifications.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Government

For Genome Editing, Self-Regulation Beats a Government Ban

A breakthrough method that makes editing the genes of living beings relatively easy, called CRISPR, is much in the news these days. So are the many implications—both terrifying and promising—associated with it. The seemingly endless possibilities of genome editing have even the scientific community on edge, and it’s stirring up heated debate about where the ethical limits are. At the moment, most of the calls for restraint in the use of CRISPR are coming directly from scientists, but it won’t be long before government officials or candidates hoping to be elected start airing their opinions about how this field should be regulated. It’s worth taking a moment to consider how different modes of oversight could affect the opportunities afforded us by genome editing.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Life Sciences: What to Expect in 2014

Now that we have recapped the major trends of 2013, let's look ahead to what will be exciting in 2014 in life sciences. In the past couple years, scientists have gone from the first proof it was possible to sequence the genome of a fetus using cells from a mother’s blood, to doing it a number of successful ways. Ethical considerations aside, this is a remarkable scientific achievement that has major implications for clinical utility.   More