Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 17 of 17 results for “cities”

Business

How Big Data Effects Cities

Dan'l Lewin at Techonomy 2014.   More

Cities Society Techonomy Events

Program Director Ross Reflects on Detroit

Highlights of Techonomy Detroit: CEO Mark Bertolini of Aetna on community based healthcare, inequality and the responsibility of CEOs. He dresses like a rock star and among CEOs, he is one. Talks ranged widely over tech and what it can do in places like Detroit. But local activist Lauren Hood reminded us "What's missing is that the people most impacted by this technology are not in the room, and that model gets replicated on any problem we have."   More

Arts & Culture Society

Mad Max with Flowers and Margaritas: How Burning Man Points to the Future

Burning Man is a serious thing. It is obviously a ludicrous stupor-inducing steam-punk fashion gala appealing to the lesser instincts. But it is also a full-blown futures laboratory. Don’t underestimate what we can learn from ourselves in this outlandish context. Burning together, we may rise more humane.   More

Analytics & Data Cities Society Techonomy Events

From Techonomy Detroit: How To Hack Our Way to Better Cities

As access to data and technology becomes democratized, a civic tech movement is burgeoning to help government make cities more responsive and livable. Detroit CIO Beth Niblock joined Techonomy CEO David Kirkpatrick for a discussion on "Hacking Our Way to the Cities We Need,” along with Danish architect and author Thomas Ermacora, investor and entrepreneur Jon Gosier, and Microsoft Technology and Civic Engagement leader Dan’l Lewin. Transparency and apps are making all the difference in Detroit, as well as in Barcelona, Chicago, Kampala, London, Nairobi, and Philadelphia. But too many cities still haven't gotten the memo.   More

Cities Learning Partner Insights Society

How City Programs Can Broaden Access to the Innovation Economy

A wide range of programs for entrepreneurship, training, and mentoring are emerging in cities around the United States. They hope to revitalize historically disadvantaged communities, broaden economic opportunity, and make cities better places. It's a 21st century brand of governance, politics, and civic engagement.   More

Cities Transportation

The Techonomic Pleasures of Renting a Bicycle in Austin

As the on-demand economy grows, people increasingly rent things just when they need them, with services like TaskRabbit, Uber, Airbnb, and RideShare. And urban bicycle rental services are burgeoning. In Austin, Texas recently, I discovered the one there is impressively well run. It integrates just the right cyber and physical elements to deliver a glass-smooth experience.   More

Cities Jobs Techonomy Events

I Love Detroit

It’s been amazing to watch the change in Detroit the past four years. In late 2011 when we started thinking about organizing a conference in Detroit, even Detroiters thought we were a little nuts. Eventually people responded with enthusiasm, especially those from out of town who were fascinated by the provocative location. Four years later, the entrepreneurial energy is going full force. Startups are burgeoning, cultural institutions are arising, and in general Detroit is a place to be. And we're still going strong. Our speaker line up for Techonomy Detroit on Sept. 15 includes Mayor Mike Duggan, Carl Bass of Autodesk, Mark Bertolini of Aetna, McKinsey's Michael Chui, Jennifer Crozier of IBM, Esther Dyson, Jim Fallows, Andrew Keen and Charlene Li.   More

Analytics & Data Cities Techonomy Events

The Responsive City: Engaging Communities Through Data-Smart Governance

What is citizenship in the digital age? Policy experts Susan Crawford of Harvard University and Jennifer Bradley of the Brookings Institution discuss themes from Crawford’s new book about civic engagement, innovation, and the role of tech and the Internet for Detroit and other major cities.   More

Cities Techonomy Events

Open Data Opens Opportunity

The digitization of everything and access to vast databases of information means we can measure more of the world. It also means we can change what we measure—about city functions, services and the economy. New opportunities are emerging to cultivate innovation, build new services and unlock economic value. Agencies across the country are opening doors to a data treasure trove hidden for years. In this session from our Sept. 16 Techonomy Detroit conference, Alex Alsup of LOVELAND Technologies, David Behen of the Michigan Department of Technology, Management, and Budget, McKinsey's Michael Chui, NYU's Joel Gurin, and Tony Scott of VMware examine how data can unlock business opportunities and speed progress for cities and citizens.   More

Analytics & Data Cities Government

How Open Data Is Transforming City Life

Start a business. Manage your power use. Find cheap rents, or avoid crime-ridden neighborhoods. Cities and their citizens worldwide are discovering the power of “open data”—public data and information available from government and other sources that can help solve civic problems and create new business opportunities. By opening up data about transportation, education, health care, and more, municipal governments are helping app developers, civil society organizations, and others to find innovative ways to tackle urban problems.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Techonomic Top 5: Startup Slowdown, Euro Urban Innovation, Prescribing Addictive Games, and More

Every week we spotlight techonomic happenings on the Web and beyond, picking people, companies, and trends that exemplify tech’s ever-growing role in business and society. Here’s what’s got our attention. A new report from entrepreneurship advocacy organization the Kauffman Foundation indicates the number high-tech startups—defined as young companies with a high proportion of STEM workers—has been in decline since 2000. The study concludes that the slowdown in tech entrepreneurship “might have disproportionate effects on long-term economic growth,” noting that while tech startups often fail, they help to sustain a vigorous rate of net new job creation.   More

Cities Internet of Things

Can the Internet of Everything Help Cities?

Local governments are about delivering services and getting things done: Fixing highways, running buses, picking up trash, ensuring public safety, educating children. To do their job in an era of tight finances, what’s needed are technologies that make public services better and cheaper, and improve the quality of life for urban Americans without increasing costs. So far the Internet and the shift to digital has boosted the efficiency of smart local governments, increased transparency, and made it easier to communicate with local residents.   More

Cities

Are Cities Engines for Smart Growth?

Kids today would rather be mayor than president, Thomas L. Friedman writes in a recent column. “The country looks so much better from the bottom up—from its major metropolitan areas—than from the top down,” he writes, pointing to the partisanship and inefficiencies in federal and state legislatures. Cities, therefore, are the laboratories and engines of our economy—a conclusion reached in a new book by Brookings Institution scholars Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley called “The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy.”   More

Cities

Rock-Bottom Real Estate Creates Opportunity in Detroit

Jerry Paffendorf and Dan Gilbert have radically different visions of urban renewal, but both seek to leverage the depressed Detroit real-estate market to spur entrepreneurship and opportunity. Paffendorf, a refugee from the Silicon Valley startup scene, created a website called "Why Don't We Own This?" which offers prospective buyers an information-rich online map of auction property. The idea behind the site is to encourage innovators to buy and renovate inexpensive properties to use for creative or entrepreneurial endeavors.   More

Business Government

Why Techonomy?: A Manifesto

We believe in the potential of technology to make the world a happier, healthier, wealthier, and more peaceful place. Techonomy's name embodies our beliefs and our mission—it combines the words "technology" and "economy" because technology has become a central part of the economy in which we operate and the society in which we live. Today technology is inextricably entwined with just about every activity that humans undertake. We embrace that fact, and seek as a company to help the world take advantage of it.   More

Cities

Space Counts: Why Physical Flows Matter in an Increasingly Virtual World

The world is changing faster than ever and sometimes it feels as though the only way to keep pace is to remain glued to our computer screens. Twitter and Facebook have become our go-to source for breaking news, more often than not beating traditional media to the story. Teleconferencing and social software have enabled a truly 24-hour workday, helping us collaborate with team members around the world without ever leaving the home office. And as our virtual lives have shrunk to fit neatly into our pockets, we remain online regardless of where we go.   More