Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results for “biotech”

Bio & Life Sciences Community Insights Healthcare

2017 Biotech Trends–Regrown Organs, Augmented Brains, and AI Diagnosis

At IndieBio we see hundreds of biotech startups and technologies, and a few key themes are emerging for 2017. Fiction is becoming a reality with cell therapies. The era of the brain has arrived. And machine learning and AI are now a key part of biotech innovation.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare Techonomy Events

Reflections from Ross: Why “Genetically Modified Everything” is so important to what we do at Techonomy

The global biotech market is estimated to have a value of $604.40 billion by 2020. Techonomy program director Ross explains how central the theme is to us, and a bit of her own history of fascination with it. This year at TE16 we’re continuing this exploration into the industries being changed by life science, the technologies, the benefits and yes, the controversies.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Global Tech Internet of Things

Techonomy’s Top Articles for 2015

At Techonomy we put on conferences and publish articles and videos. Our most popular articles this year tackled the conceptual problem with the Apple Watch, the Human side of the Internet of Things, how consumer genomics empowers consumers, tech and artificial intelligence progress in Ethiopia, and the need for the biotech industry to step up its game in communicating to the general public. It's a good flavor of the range of issues and topics that fascinate and motivate us. Keep with us in 2016 for much much more!   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Ubiquitous Biotech in a Time of Ignorance

Biology has recently found solutions we didn’t imagine were possible, such as the recent discovery that plants’ chlorophyll molecules act at the quantum mechanical level to maximize energy harvested from the sun. Yet, when it comes to understanding biotechnology innovations, the general public is sadly misinformed about the science. Unfounded fears have prompted the European Union to place stringent controls on the use and growth of GMO crops, and many EU countries require permits to do basic molecular biology and genetic engineering.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Techonomy Events

Talking About Biology’s Grass Roots Revolution

“As a reporter who’s covered both biotech and what the rest of the world calls just plain ‘tech,’ I can tell you those stories about biology can be tougher to tell,” said WIRED senior writer Marcus Wohlsen during a session, entitled "The Next Revolution Will Be Biologized," that he moderated at Techonomy 2014 in Half Moon Bay last week. Wholsen shared the stage with a panel of the sector’s thought leaders: attorney and consultant Nancy Kelley; chemical biologist Floyd Romesberg of The Scripps Research Institute; synthetic biology pioneer Drew Endy of Stanford University; and Brian Frezza, founder of “biotech lab for hire” Emerald Therapeutics.   More

Manufacturing Techonomy Events

Technologies and Trends that Let Small Designers Make Stuff Locally

While most of the world is yet to be enlightened as to how 3D printing will change manufacturing, Autodesk CEO Carl Bass is already talking about its limitations, and why biological manufacturing is the industry’s more exciting future. Bass joined fellow manufacturing industry thought leaders last week at Techonomy 2014 in Half Moon Bay, Calif., for a conversation about how hardware and software are changing manufacturing.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Techonomy Events Video

The Next Revolution Will Be Biologized

Innovation in biology is accelerating at a rate that makes Moore’s Law look leisurely, throwing open doors to opportunities unimaginable. From food to fuel, manufacturing to medicine, business to buildings, what do the visionaries see just beyond the horizon? Stanford's Drew Endy, Brian Frezza of Emerald Therapeutics, Nancy J. Kelley of the New York Genome Center, and Floyd Romesberg of The Scripps Research Institute discuss the social and economic impact of biotech in this discussion, moderated by Marcus Wohlsen of WIRED, from the opening day of the Techonomy 2014 conference in Half Moon Bay, Calif.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Breakout Labs Aims to Take Science from the Lab to Supercharge the Economy

How do scientists working on radical new ideas translate ingenuity into sustainable business models? And how do entrepreneurs find the science they might need to create a breakthrough biotech product? Lab coats have to brush up against business suits. Breakout Labs, a seed fund project of Peter Thiel's Thiel Foundation, makes it happen. The fund seeks to help early-stage science and technology companies "break out" of the lab and into the business world with grants of up to $350,000. This helps companies achieve “very specific scientific milestones,” says Breakout Labs Executive Director Lindy Fishburne.   More

Global Tech Healthcare

Southeast Asia’s Health App Explosion

Millions of Southeast Asians today lack access to affordable, quality healthcare. Improving Southeast Asia’s healthcare systems will require billions of dollars in new infrastructure, but putting all that money to work will take time that millions don’t have. As more people gain access to connected devices, however, entrepreneurs, companies, and organizations across the region see potential to speed improvements to healthcare delivery with new web and mobile applications.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Why Memorize Shakespeare’s Sonnets When You Can Encode Them on a Speck of DNA?

Technology has enabled us to collect and analyze unprecedented amounts of data. As Ray Kurzweil commented at the Techonomy 2012 conference, "The kid in Africa with a smartphone has access to more intelligently searchable information than the President of the United States did 15 years ago." But how do we go about storing all of this data? Hard drives and the Cloud require an electricity supply, while other storage devices such as disks or magnetic tape deteriorate over time. The answer to this archiving conundrum may lie in our DNA. As reported on NPR, scientists at the European Bioinformatics Institute have successfully stored all of Shakespeare's sonnets on tiny particles of DNA.   More