Tag Index  /  Showing 1 - 9 of 9 results for “AutoDesk”

Bio & Life Sciences

Contradictions Abound in Public Opinions about Genetics

People are so opposed to GMOs that such food has often been banned, though studies find zero evidence it harms people. But paradoxically, when it comes to editing human genomes, many are eager to press forward. Yet here scientists themselves mostly call for caution, because little is known about long-term ramifications.   More

Arts & Culture Learning Manufacturing

Five Ways AR and VR Will Improve Our Current Reality

A flood of investments into the new tools of reality continues to fuel innovation. Virtual and augmented reality, from the original Google Glass to the latest Oculus Rift, has continually shaped the technology market,and will grow substantially in the coming years. AR and VR will impact the world around us in a number of interesting—and beneficial—ways. Here are five things to look forward to.   More

Cities Jobs Techonomy Events

I Love Detroit

It’s been amazing to watch the change in Detroit the past four years. In late 2011 when we started thinking about organizing a conference in Detroit, even Detroiters thought we were a little nuts. Eventually people responded with enthusiasm, especially those from out of town who were fascinated by the provocative location. Four years later, the entrepreneurial energy is going full force. Startups are burgeoning, cultural institutions are arising, and in general Detroit is a place to be. And we're still going strong. Our speaker line up for Techonomy Detroit on Sept. 15 includes Mayor Mike Duggan, Carl Bass of Autodesk, Mark Bertolini of Aetna, McKinsey's Michael Chui, Jennifer Crozier of IBM, Esther Dyson, Jim Fallows, Andrew Keen and Charlene Li.   More

Manufacturing Techonomy Events

Technologies and Trends that Let Small Designers Make Stuff Locally

While most of the world is yet to be enlightened as to how 3D printing will change manufacturing, Autodesk CEO Carl Bass is already talking about its limitations, and why biological manufacturing is the industry’s more exciting future. Bass joined fellow manufacturing industry thought leaders last week at Techonomy 2014 in Half Moon Bay, Calif., for a conversation about how hardware and software are changing manufacturing.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Techonomy Events

Innovating Tools for Quantifying the Self, and Future Self

The quantified-self movement is rapidly moving beyond the Fitbit. Forget about wristbands to measure your vitals. DIYers known as Grinders are embedding electronics in their own bodies; transcranial direct-current stimulation experimentalists are putting wet sponges on their heads to improve cognitive function; and others, hoping to enhance their relationships with pets, are investing millions into developing EEG headsets that let them read dog thoughts. Eri Gentry, Carlos Olguin, and Drew Purves, all innovators at the fore of the field, joined WIRED writer Marcus Wohlsen at Techonomy 2014 on Monday for a conversation exploring what we mean when we talk about "innovating ourselves."   More

Bio & Life Sciences Partner Insights

Dassault Systèmes’ 3D “Living Heart” May Transform Diagnosis and Treatment

The day is coming when “electronic health record” doesn't mean just a digital transcript of doctors’ notes about exams and tests, but a three-dimensional digital model of your entire anatomy. The first version of such a human avatar-for-health now exists—the world’s first realistic 3D simulation of a whole human heart. It doesn't just look like a heart. Its software is designed to make it function like one. The outcome of the Living Heart Project—a stealth interdisciplinary collaboration among more than 50 medical researchers, practitioners, device manufacturers, and industry regulators—the model was introduced today by Dassault Systèmes.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Using Software to Program the Building Blocks of Life

“What’s beautiful about software is that it makes complex jobs easy,” opines Andrew Hessel, a distinguished researcher at Autodesk, the software company best known for the design software, AutoCAD. What’s really beautiful about what Hessel and others at Autodesk are working on is what they’re building new design tools for—life itself. Hessel, who spoke at Techonomy’s November conferences in 2011 and 2013, sees the work Autodesk is involved in as a way to create greater access to the burgeoning field of synthetic biology and, along the way, turbocharge fields like energy and food production, manufacturing, and hopefully developing personalized, genetic-level tools for fighting, maybe even curing, things like cancer.   More

Analytics & Data Bio & Life Sciences Business

23andMe’s FDA Battle Provokes Furious Debate

Medical researchers, genomics experts, and industry pundits took wildly divergent points of view in a media storm that erupted last week over FDA’s stern letter ordering 23andMe to stop marketing its Personal Genome Service. The agency cited concerns about “the public health consequences of inaccurate results.” Others say public access to genomic information is just the beginning of ongoing disruption in healthcare.   More

Business

Why Scavenge for YouTube Videos When You Can Just Chill?

Internet and mobile users can find just about anything through the recommendations of friends. The concept of “social discovery” is seen in services like Pinterest, which provides members with fashion and lifestyle inspiration; Highlight, which creates new social connections based on personal interests and location; and Socialcam, which enables user-generated video sharing among friends. But whatever the content—reviews, images, music—how do you sift through it all to find what suits your preferences? Chill, a new social discovery service that aims to help users mediate the glut of online video content, is catching the attention of top-tier investors and online video gurus.   More