Tag Index  /  Showing 41 - 57 of 57 results for “Apple”

Business Startup Culture

Welcome to Little Big Inc.

You’ve got a great idea. You’ve assembled a team of four or five people, all enthusiastic, all raring to go. That’s it. You’re ready to take on the giants. This is not the familiar story of online start-ups and one-app wonders, where the business model is a quick sell-out to Facebook, Google, or Apple. Instead it’s the story of companies like Jimdo, a small German business that makes it easy to build and run websites—whether you want to run a blog, create a personal site to show off your fly-fishing prowess, or create an online presence for your small business. Jimdo started as the side project of an online marketing team that didn’t like the software available at the time to build websites. So they built their own easy-to-use, browser-based tools.   More

Business

Apple Invests in China—Finally

For a company of its size, Apple has been surprisingly conservative about its investments in China, opening just a few of its trademark stores in a country that is already one of its top global markets but otherwise making few major investments. But that could soon change with talk that the world's biggest tech company is aiming to open a research and development center in China, which has become an unspoken prerequisite for any company that hopes to successfully do big business in the country.   More

Manufacturing

Apple to Revamp U.S. Manufacturing Efforts

Good news for U.S. manufacturing: Apple is bringing some of its computer manufacturing back to the United States, Timothy Cook announced on Thursday. The company plans to spend $100 million in 2013 on producing one of its existing Mac lines in America. Apple is often criticized for outsourcing almost all of its factory work to Asia in the late 1990s.   More

Business Techonomy Events

The Internet’s Fantastic Four: How Google, Amazon, Facebook, and Apple Rule the Web

Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Apple: four Internet companies that are, arguably, the best of the best. They’re global goliaths that leave little room for competitors in a fast-growing online world. At the Techonomy conference outside of Tucson, Ariz., an afternoon panel explored why these companies succeed, how they can keep growing, and whether they are stifling innovation.   More

Business Techonomy Events

The Limits of the Virtual: Why Stores and Conferences Won’t Go Away

Last week we attended the Singularity Summit. During this two day celebration of all things technologically progressive, we enjoyed the summit’s signature cocktail of research, futurism, and metaphysics. Speakers speculated on topics ranging from virtual realities, cybernetics, and what post-carbon life would be like for mankind. As we listened, we were struck that even for this group of ardent technology enthusiasts, there was an excitement and energy that came from gathering in a single room and meeting face to face.   More

Techonomy Events

Here Comes the Techonomy Conference

This weekend at Techonomy 2012, we gather near Tucson to try to make sense of the explosion of data, the empowerment of the planet by mobile devices, how companies and governments must reorganize themselves, the insurgent influence of robots, and the growing global power of a few key American Internet companies. And that's just all I could fit into the first sentence.   More

Business Techonomy Events

Six Ways Organizations Can Survive Until 2100

I am a Techonomist, and this year will be attending my third Techonomy conference. Techonomy explores "the role of technology in business and social progress." I love the word “progress.” It has that gentle flavor of positivism; in the direction of better. I am more and more convinced that we don’t need innovation; we need progress. How is progress reflected in a modern company? What does a 21st century company look like? Or maybe we should start thinking about what a 22nd century company would look like.   More

Government Manufacturing

How Obama and Romney Should Have Answered the Manufacturing Question

Near the end of last night’s presidential debate, moderator Candy Crowley asked President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney a common question: How do you convince companies like Apple to bring manufacturing back to America? Unfortunately, both candidates flubbed their answers, AllThingsD’s Arik Hesseldahl argues. Romney simply talked about Chinese currency manipulation and intellectual property […]   More

Business Government

Abolish Patents to Spark Innovation, Fed Paper Urges

Researchers at the US Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis say that the patent system should be abolished, SmartPlanet reports. Innovation will come from a patentless, cooperative environment in which technologies and discoveries are shared.   More

Business Cities

Friedman vs. Florida, or How to Thrive in a World Both Flat and Spiky

The regional effect of technological advancement and globalization is a widely studied and hotly contested topic. Thomas Friedman’s renowned book, The World is Flat, argues that globalization and technological advancement have leveled the playing field in terms of commerce—that location is less and less important. These technologies, Friedman writes, have contributed to the meteoric rise of the Indian and Chinese middle class and will continue to decrease barriers to international flows of goods and knowledge.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Mobile Health Apps Not So User-Friendly for Seniors

The rapid proliferation of mobile apps for health could hit a wall not usually associated with smart phones – they may be too hard to use by the patients that need them most. In a paper slated for presentation at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society annual meeting (Oct 22-25, Boston), researchers Laura A. Whitlock and Anne Collins McLaughlin of North Carolina State University warned that self-monitoring apps for diabetics are often not user-friendly for older patients.   More

Business

The Ripple Effect of the Apple-Samsung Verdict

The Apple-Samsung verdict will have lasting consequences in the consumer tech field. Shelley Palmer of MediaBizBloggers.com lays out the good (patent protection), the bad (fewer consumer options), and the sad (an uncertain future for tablet innovation).   More

Business Manufacturing

Don’t Call It Crowdsourcing: Quirky CEO Ben Kaufman Brings Invention to the Masses

As he prepared for the 2007 Macworld Expo, 19-year-old inventor Ben Kaufman wondered how he could ever top the buzz his company, Mophie, had generated at the 2006 event. Instead of shooting for another iLounge Best of Show award with a clever new iPod case, he decided to invent a product on the spot—and enlisted total strangers to help him do it. Now 25, Kaufman is CEO of the consumer product company Quirky, which is transforming manufacturing by letting consumers decide what gets produced.   More

Media & Marketing Techonomy Events Video

McKinsey’s Bertil Chappuis Maps Five Trends in Mobile, Social, and Video

In this 10-minute talk from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Bertil Chappuis, Senior Partner at McKinsey & Company Inc., outlines five US trends in mobile, social media, video, and communication that were identified by iConsumer, the company's consumer insight asset.   More

Techonomy Events

Jack Dorsey Explains Square’s Pay-by-Voice Technology

In this video from the "21st Century Individuals vs. 20th Century Organizations" session at Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Techonomy's David Kirkpatrick talks to Twitter co-founder and Square CEO Jack Dorsey about what we can expect from Square in the next five years. The mobile app, which allows anyone to accept credit card payments to their phones or devices, has the potential to revolutionize the way businesses interact with customers. The pay-by-voice system that Dorsey refers to in the video, now known as Pay With Square, is already being used at 75,000 shops around the country.   More

Business Techonomy Events

Marissa Mayer on Apple vs. Google Product Development

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo! and former Vice President of Consumer Products at Google, compares the Apple and Google methods of product development. Whereas Apple launches frequently and always hits its mark, she says, Google is more tentative in its product releases, getting feedback from consumers before finalizing its products.   More

Business Media & Marketing Techonomy Events

Sprint’s Dan Hesse on Why Consumers Still Don’t Dictate Product Development

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Dan Hesse, CEO of Sprint Nextel Corporation, argues that even though consumers now play a big roll in improving customer service via social networks, they still don't dictate new product development.   More