Digital

Buddy Media’s Lazerow on Personal Technology and its Limits

Every night around 6 p.m. Eastern Time, Michael Lazerow eats dinner with his family. Usually this means sitting down in his New York City apartment with his wife and three children. But sometimes, when the Buddy Media CEO is traveling for business, he sits on the table instead of in a chair.   More

Elections Government Manufacturing

How Obama and Romney Should Have Answered the Manufacturing Question

Near the end of last night’s presidential debate, moderator Candy Crowley asked President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney a common question: How do you convince companies like Apple to bring manufacturing back to America? Unfortunately, both candidates flubbed their answers, AllThingsD’s Arik Hesseldahl argues. Romney simply talked about Chinese currency manipulation and intellectual property […]   More

Digital Life Science

Plans to Digitize Health Records Draw Skepticism

As the medical industry strives to integrate new technology to improve services and outcomes, venture capital funding for healthcare IT has tripled in the last three years, according to a story by WNYC's Mary Harris. Now, the federal government is preparing to pump $29 million into efforts to digitize healthcare records, with Obamacare ready to penalize providers who don't conform. But Ross Koppel, professor of sociology and medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has doubts about just how efficient and cost-effective the transition to digitized record-keeping will be.   More

Cities Startup Culture

Portland’s Startup Renaissance

Le_Portland Startups

People have come and gone from Portland, Ore., but in the past decade more have come and stayed. Today, Portland is seeing a startup renaissance, made more apparent by this month’s Portland Digital eXperience and XOXO Conference. The city has become a forum where people share ideas they hope could redefine the local economy in the next 5-10 years.   More

Startup Culture Techonomy Detroit

Venture for America Plants Budding Entrepreneurs in Urban Soil

Venture for America founder Andrew Yang

Before the Techonomy Detroit conference in September, we talked to Venture for America founder Andrew Yang about how his new program is attracting young talent to startups in Detroit and elsewhere. Like a Teach for America for wannabe entrepreneurs, Venture for America matches the best and the brightest young graduates with startup companies in struggling cities. Ultimately the program hopes to help reinvigorate the American economy and entrepreneurial spirit, says Yang.   More

Digital Elections

Dick Costolo on How Twitter Redefines the Role of News Media

In an interview with WNYC's Jeremy Hobson, Twitter CEO Dick Costolo elaborates on the heightened role that Twitter now plays in society—particularly relevant given the explosion of tweets surrounding the presidential and vice-presidential debates. "We used to have a filtered, one-way view of events in the world from the media," says Costolo. "America's perspective of it, or the world's perspective of that event, would be seen through the lens of the way that the media described it to them."   More

Life Science

Consumer Genetics Starts to Pay Off

One of the biggest hopes when the $3 billion Human Genome Project launched two decades ago was that it would one day put lots of basic genetic information into the hands of the general public. It's taken a long time, and many argue that the whole project was a waste of money. But in research labs and technology incubators, real advances are underway. The nascent field of consumer genetics is starting to fulfill the potential of the Human Genome Project.   More

Digital Media & Marketing

Real or Rendered? How 3D Imagery Is Changing the Way You Shop

"Charger Pursuit," rendered by Midcoast for Union AdWorks

The next time you shop for a vehicle, flip through a furniture catalog, or look at clothing online, the images you see may not be photography, but rather a collection of pixels assembled by an artist on a computer screen.   More

Digital

The Side Effects of Screen-Addiction

Is technology ruining our teenagers? Today’s teens are constantly staring at screens of smartphones, iPods, tablets, computers and TVs. And the consequences are problematic, psychologist Dr. Aric Sigman has found. Teens’ addiction to gadgets is wrecking their attention spans, triggering depression, and creating a sedentary lifestyle that is linked to heart disease, strokes and diabetes. Not to mention contributing to global warming, SmartPlanet reports. Obviously technology is doing the world a lot of good—but how do we harness tech without turning our children into mush?   More

Digital Life Science Partner Insights

Healthcare of the Future: Connected and Mobile

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The U.S. healthcare industry has come a long way in recent decades in using telecommunication services to improve patient care. Sick or injured people in remote areas such as the South Pole and on cruise ships can get evaluated by specialists thanks to advancements in technology. More doctors are adopting electronic health records to manage patient care, and more patients have access to those records via Internet-based systems.   More

Digital

Why One Globetrotter Dumped the iPhone and Learned to Love the Droid (With Google Voice)

The author using her Android in Barcelona

I wondered: did I make a mistake? Did I walk out too soon? But sometimes you have to make a break. Despite years of togetherness, new-and-improved wasn't good enough. So describes a fraught goodbye, as with glimpses of no. 5 appearing above the horizon, I made the switch. It was a tough decision to leave iPhone for Android. I’d been a long-time loyalist—ever grateful to the unflinching attention given to sensibility in product design, not to mention user experience. But I finally abandoned superior detailing and materiality for something more basic: the freedom of the open road.   More

The Arts

Is Art.sy the Pandora of the Art World?

Art.sy, a free online fine art image repository, went live on Monday, promising to do for the world of fine art what Pandora and Netflix have done for music and film. The company has partnered with 275 galleries and 50 museums, digitizing about 20,000 images into what they are calling the "Art Genome Project." The repository recognizes about 800 tags, or "genes," developed and applied to the works by a dozen art historians. From objective criteria like time and place, to the more quirky attributes of contemporary art, each label is designed to link to other similar works that might be of interest to viewers or buyers.   More

Learning

Higher Ed for a Networked Age: A View From Inside NYU

Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher of AllThingsD inaugurating INC@NYU's Internet Oral History Project

To answer the research questions that have emerged during the first two decades of digital mass media, a new academic discipline is emerging in universities around the world. We might call it Network Studies—an interdisciplinary field that synthesizes network theory, media history, and mathematics, along with various social, cognitive, and computer sciences to research a global network culture that is morphing with increasing velocity.   More

Digital The Arts

Crowdfund Your Next Album Release, Even If You’re Already a Star

Amanda Palmer (Photo by Andrius Lipsys)

As a result of digitalization and widespread piracy, music album sales are less than half what they were a decade ago. The trend forces many artists to produce albums independently. An increasing number of musicians are circumventing major record labels by using crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter.   More

Business Digital Elections

Campaigns Use Social Media to Lure Younger Voters

This presidential campaign has taken social media to a new level, expanding beyond Facebook and Twitter and into the world of Pinterest, Instagram, Flickr, Tumblr, and Spotify. Both camps are reaching out to young voters by employing online tactics, from GIFs to pics. But is Ann Romney’s patriotic cake recipe on Pinterest or the Obama-Biden Spotify playlist enough to woo important swing votes? Both campaigns seem to believe that the more online action, the better.   More

Government Learning Manufacturing

Defense Department Funds High School “Hackerspaces”

A new $10 million federal program is bringing “hackerspaces” to high schools, the New York Times reports. Hackerspaces are community groups for hackers to build and invent technology (and take things apart). They are considered incubators for innovation and a major part of the DIY movement—but the high school program has sparked some controversy.   More

Learning

Worried About Student Debt? Major in STEM

students analizing on microscopes

Student debt is so widespread that two-thirds of the class of 2010 graduated with loans averaging $25,250 each, according to the Project on Student Debt. At the same time, some experts say the country is facing a shortage of workers in STEM fields—Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. This means that it may be easier to find good-paying jobs in these fields.Is the STEM shortage a way out of student loan woes? Perhaps if more students choose to study a STEM subject, the country would see less student debt.   More

Government Manufacturing Security & Privacy

A Gun Made from a 3D Printer? Techno-Challenges Grow More Complex

At Techonomy we believe that just about literally everything is being transformed by technology, especially Internet technology, and we also are quite psyched about 3D printing. It's another example of the empowerment of individuals—in the potent tradition of the PC, Web browser, Facebook, etc. But now guns are beginning to be made with 3D printers. There is likely nothing that can be done to stop that. It underscores another fundamental Techonomy point—that all of us, as citizens, leaders, and human beings—need to be thinking harder about what technology is doing to the world in which we live. Disruption is right.   More

Digital Security & Privacy

Technology Helps Germany Reconstruct Its Painful History

The Stasi, the police arm of the East German government that crumbled in 1989 with the fall of the Berlin Wall, attempted to destroy millions of documents chronicling decades of spying on its own citizens. While many of the files are unrecoverable, Germans still want to know as much as much as they can about what they contained—over 70,000 have applied for access to the Stasi archives, prompting an effort to reconstruct shredded files. As reported by NPR's Philip Reeves, the German government is using technology to piece together the remnants, many of which were torn by hand in the last panicked days of the East German regime.   More

Digital Media & Marketing

Deciphering Facebook’s Ad Exchange

Facebook is still formulating ways to leverage its massive user base (which just surpassed one billion) to create new models for ad revenue. The launch this summer of its own ad exchange was a step in that direction, albeit one that draws on precedents established by Web publishers like Yahoo and AOL. How does the Exchange actually work? Peter Kafka of AllThingsD asked Triggit CEO Zach Coelius to lay out the basics. Judge for yourself how successful he is in translating ad-tech speak into plain English.   More