Global Tech Opinion

When Moore Is Not Enough – Why Our Growing Networks Require More Software

Image courtesy Shutterstock

The demand for communications bandwidth is expanding faster each year. We’re entering a stage where just Moore’s Law and faster and cheaper computing power will simply not be enough. The networks themselves need to become programmable platforms. The infrastructure needs to be as real-time, flexible and dynamic as our smartphones have become. Today software can scale up or down networks to meet user demands.   More

Global Tech Media & Marketing

The Facebook Pushback in India: Anti-Corporate, Anti-American, Anti-Poor

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg cares passionately about success around the world, especially India. He hosted Indian Prime Minister Modi at Facebook in September 2015.

There's huge controversy in India over Facebook's "Free Basics" Internet plan, part of the global Internet.org initiative the company has been spearheading. Facebook's aim, it says, is to get more people onto the Internet, since being online is essential for participation in any modern economy. In India, however, the project is encountering fierce resistance from elites who say it violates "net neutrality." But do all the critics--mostly upper-class and affluent Indian pundits, professors and anti-corporate activists--have a better way to get many millions of less-privileged Indians onto the Internet?   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare Society

The Three Best Digital Health Books of 2015

Here are three great books on the future of healthcare published in 2015. (image courtesy Shutterstock)

As new technologies continue to drive rapid change in the practice and business of healthcare, keeping up with the latest developments can be difficult. Fortunately, several great books on this topic were published in 2015. As a digital health entrepreneur, I found the following three particularly valuable: The Patient Will See You Now: The Future of Medicine is in Your Hands by Eric Topol; The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype, and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age by Robert Wachter; and Epic Measures: One Doctor. Seven Billion Patients. by Jeremy N. Smith.   More

Opinion Society

Unfazedly Optimistic Holiday Greetings!

Illustration by Clara Kirkpatrick

And so another year ends–with stunning speed and with surprising and slightly disturbing warmth here in New York. Techonomy wishes you happy and merry and a new year of continued optimism, despite the mood of the moment. Here are some thoughts about the kind of world we can collectively create, worth keeping in mind as a new year dawns amidst escalating short-sighted rhetoric and much distraction.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Global Tech Internet of Things

Techonomy’s Top Articles for 2015

At Techonomy we put on conferences and publish articles and videos. Our most popular articles this year tackled the conceptual problem with the Apple Watch, the Human side of the Internet of Things, how consumer genomics empowers consumers, tech and artificial intelligence progress in Ethiopia, and the need for the biotech industry to step up its game in communicating to the general public. It's a good flavor of the range of issues and topics that fascinate and motivate us. Keep with us in 2016 for much much more!   More

Global Tech Security & Privacy

Welcome to the Splinternet

Donald Trump has referred to "closing" the Internet in areas where the U.S. has enemies, while China's president, Xi Jinping, reasserted last week that each state has a sovereign right to control what its citizens can and can't do in cyberspace. Russia believes a state should control "its" Internet. A European Union regulation determines how non-EU companies can market to or monitor EU individuals. That four such distinct political cultures could all reach the same conclusion suggests that the days of a universal Internet are numbered.   More

Arts & Culture Startup Culture

Rock Stars of Tech

Linkin Park are not just a hugely successful rock band–they're also tech investors and advocates of business innovation. (photo courtesy Linkin Park)

Standing in a dark club during the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, among CEOs and political leaders, we all wait for The Killers to take the stage. I strike up a conversation with the person who just happens to be standing on my left–cultural icon and music superstar will.i.am. He shows me a device he's wearing, a sort of watch being developed by a company he started called i.am+. I can see how proud he is of it. He walks me through the functions, highlighting the user interface and how you can connect to the Internet without needing a phone. He pauses, looking for an indication of my thoughts. He's just one of a number of music industry veterans now finding their way into tech.   More

Opinion Security & Privacy Society

Are We Ready for Techno-Social Engineering?

The future of our personal data is in the hands of companies that author Morrison worries we cannot trust. (image courtesy Shutterstock)

Companies like Facebook and Google are developing new technologies to mine our data, to assess who we are and what we want, and – to hear the Internet giants tell it – deliver elegantly tailored experiences that help us better understand and interact with the world around us. David Lazer, an authority on social networks at Northeastern University, refers to it as the rise of the social algorithm and says it's an epic paradigm shift fraught with social and policy implications. Cardozo School of Law’s Brett Frischmann calls it techno-social engineering.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

CellMax Life Is Changing the Rules for Cancer Screening

CellMax Life can identify cancer cells earlier, which may be a really big deal. (illustration courtesy Shutterstock)

An unheralded Silicon Valley biotechnology startup is fundamentally changing the rules of cancer screening. CellMax Life, headquartered in both Mountain View and Taipei, is deploying a technology that can detect cancer cells at their earliest stages. It has the potential to decisively change the economics of cancer screening and impacting cancer outcomes worldwide.   More

Bio & Life Sciences

The Personal Genome Project Ten Years Later: What We’ve Learned

Some of the many brave souls who opened their genomic and other data to the world in the Personal Genome Project starting in 2005. The strips of tape help record facial metrics. (Photo courtesy PGP)

It's ten years since the launch of the Personal Genome Project. PGP was the first attempt to assemble a massive study of people willing to publicly share the DNA information from their entire genome as well as their medical history, biological samples, and even facial images. A decade ago many thought it crazy. But it has been an extraordinary success.   More

Opinion Society

How We Re-Humanized Our Planet (A look back from 2065)

Simone Ross onstage at TE15. She co-wrote this essay to illustrate how tech might help in "Rehumanizing Society," which was the conference theme.

"Towards the end of 2015, our world was in turmoil. Instability, fear, and anxiety dominated the global dialogue," this essay begins. But from there it imagines what that world might look like if all the potential we at Techonomy see in tech were to become realized in the next fifty years. It's an only somewhat whimsical vision, meant to be inspiring and reassuring. It's why we remain resolute optimists.   More

E-Commerce

Techonomy’s Fourth Annual Holiday Gift Guide

Amazon's Echo is one of the hottest tech gifts this year. It's a truly new category of device.

With Black Friday lasting a full month this year, you may already be feeling some holiday-shopping fatigue. We’re here to help! Following our tradition, we searched high and low for Techonomic gifts to suit just about everyone on your list. Here’s what we’ll be shopping for this season.   More

Business Opinion

How to Succeed at Crowdsourcing Innovation

shutterstock_340600592

Vigilant business leaders fear becoming irrelevant. We must encourage our employees to want to innovate – not because they are under threat, but because they are eager to be engaged. Much of an organization’s best innovation is driven by ideas that come bottom-up, originating from the grassroots. How can leaders effectively crowdsource innovation?   More

Finance Global Tech Opinion

Big Tech: Better Together or Better Apart? Wall Street Doesn’t Care.

HP and Compaq, HPE and HPQ, Tweedledee and Tweedledum– better together? It may not matter. Now they're apart.

Wall Street fashions come and go. Does a company do better as an ever-accumulating conglomerate or a thinning-down disaggregator of business units? Eager investment bankers, hungry for fees, apply different rationales in different times. Hewlett-Packard and Compaq were better together. Now HPE and HPQ, are better apart. Or so they say. And the transaction occurred, generating vast fees for lawyers, bankers, and consultants. The benefit to shareholders, employees, and customers? Unclear.   More

Analytics & Data Healthcare Internet of Things

How Mobile Tech Can Tame Diabetes

In Manila, commuting may be colorful but it can take forever. Inactive people are prone to diabetes, a growing scourge there. New apps can help. (photo Shutterstock)

Over three-quarters of the world’s diabetics live in low- and middle-income countries. It is one of the world’s leading causes of death and disability and afflicts over 400 million people. Many of the most promising new technologies being developed to address this global epidemic are low-cost mobile solutions especially suited for emerging markets. Their impact is likely to be felt strongly in coming years.   More

Techonomy Events

Four Ways Techonomy 2015 Made News: “Why hasn’t every CEO committed to making sure women and men are paid the same?”

Sean Parker being interviewed by David Kirkpatrick at Techonomy 2015. Memorable line: “I’ll discourage my kids from using the products I built.”

At least four big things happened at Techonomy 2015: Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker announced the department's Digital Economy Agenda, Marc Benioff called for equality as a corporate virtue, social network creator Sean Parker criticized social networks as havens of narcissism, and McKinsey explained just how complex for every kind of worker will be the transition to a partially-automated world.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Energy & Green Tech Internet of Things

Will Programming Plants Feed the World?

This indoor farm in Japan is state-of-the-art, growing salad greens at high speed but high quality. (photo courtesy Philips)

By 2025 food shortages and price fluctuations could be a thing of the past, everywhere. New technologies for cultivating plants indoors could feed eight billion people, save energy and dramatically reduce pollution. But beyond the growing enthusiasm for "vertical farms" or "plant factories" lies the potential to alter elements in the recipe for these environments to create plants and foods with no precedent–more nutritious, hardy, or tasty–or whatever other characteristics we decide to favor.   More

Techonomy Events

Reflections from Ross: Memorable Quotes from Techonomy 2015

Adam Mosseri, who oversees the Facebook news feed, on stage at Techonomy 2015 with David Kirkpatrick. (Photo Rebecca Greenfield)

Brought up at Techonomy 2015: Afghan social networks, algorithms, ants, artificial intelligence, augmented reality, biofabrication, blockchain, business accelerators for women and minorities, digital economy, empathy, equality, fashion, Internet of things, ISIS, justice, libraries, neuroscience, neurotech, pay parity, privacy, robots for mining, values (of people, computers and networks), voting machines that are too old, Taliban's use of bluetooth marketing, and virtual reality. Here are tidbits from some of the best sessions.   More

Business

Techonomy Magazine: Future Healthcare, Indoor Agriculture, Design, Global Inclusion…

It's the fourth time Techonomy has published its print and digital magazine.

The latest issue of the print and digital Techonomy Magazine includes articles on topics ranging from how the emergence of genomic medicine challenges the American health care system to a deep look at how technologized indoor agriculture may remake not only what we eat but its environmental consequences as well. We look at the inclusive potential of the Blockchain, and sit down with Museum of Modern Art design curator Paola Antonelli. There are also sections with fascinating quotes from our Bio, Policy and Detroit conferences from earlier in the year.   More

Analytics & Data Internet of Things Security & Privacy

How Good Guys Can Win the Cyberwars

Cybersecurity session at Techonomy 2015– moderator Michael Patsalos-Fox far right. Others, from left: Rowan Trollope of Cisco,
Victoria A. Espinel of the Business Software Alliance,
Nicole Eagan of Darktrace,
Special Agent David Johnson of the FB,I
Brian Kelly of Rackspace, and Elena Kvochko of Barclays.

When it comes to the cyberwars, are good guys or bad guys winning? I moderated a panel at Techonomy 2015 that explored this question. The answer isn’t a simple yes or no – and in light of the recent events in Paris, the question of our security feels even more critical. The industrialization of cybercrime is upon us. Today’s criminals are networked and well equipped. All organizations must prepare themselves for a series of battles.   More