Energy & Green Tech Techonomy Events

What Really Drove the Green Revolution

At the Techonomy 2014 conference in Half Moon Bay, Calif., Drew Purves of Microsoft Research speaks about why we will need a second green revolution in order to keep the globe well fed.   More

Business Techonomy Events

A Future Without Industries

Tech and the Internet blur borders between industries. Meanwhile, connectedness is accelerating globalization. We’re redefining what a company does and where it is. What does the new borderless world of business mean for incumbents, and for the next generation corporation? In this session from the Techonomy 2014 conference in Half Moon Bay, Calif., Castlight Health CEO Giovanni Colella, Intuit founder Scott Cook, McKinsey's Eric Kutcher, and Talko CEO Ray Ozzie discuss how tech is transforming the way that we define industries.   More

Business Techonomy Events

Preemptive Innovation

Innovation is happening faster because it’s getting better organized. Incubators of all stripes are sprouting all over the world. Large corporations are spinning in talent and building internal startup labs. Leaders know they can’t just wait around for inspiration to strike, they have to seek it out or grow it themselves. At the Techonomy 2014 conference in Half Moon Bay, Calif., Idealab CEO Bill Gross, Citi Ventures CEO Debby Hopkins, and Coca-Cola SVP Guy Wollaert talk about how companies can stay ahead of the innovation curve in this discussion moderated by McKinsey's Michael Chui.   More

Techonomy Events

From Genius to Table: Organic Innovation

At the Techonomy 2014 conference in Half Moon Bay, Calif., Techonomy's David Kirkpatrick interviews the irreverent Michael Fertik of Reputation.com about his latest "innovation," Femto-Management.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Techonomy Events Video

The Next Revolution Will Be Biologized

Innovation in biology is accelerating at a rate that makes Moore’s Law look leisurely, throwing open doors to opportunities unimaginable. From food to fuel, manufacturing to medicine, business to buildings, what do the visionaries see just beyond the horizon? Stanford's Drew Endy, Brian Frezza of Emerald Therapeutics, Nancy J. Kelley of the New York Genome Center, and Floyd Romesberg of The Scripps Research Institute discuss the social and economic impact of biotech in this discussion, moderated by Marcus Wohlsen of WIRED, from the opening day of the Techonomy 2014 conference in Half Moon Bay, Calif.   More

Techonomy Events

Unitive’s Laura Mather on the Science of Diversity

On the opening day of the Techonomy 2014 conference, Laura Mather, founder and CEO of Unitive, spoke about how her company's software helps to eliminate unconscious bias and encourage diversity in hiring and promotion.   More

Techonomy Events

Program Director Simone Ross Looks Back at Our First Five Years

The opening session at TE11 (photo: Robert Hines)

I think of our conferences as a live version of my favorite magazine. I want information and intelligence, style and substance, blending short and long form to pace the experience and narrative. Our programs are not simply about the intersection of tech and the economy. They are about the application of tech, and its global economic and social impact. Ultimately we explore whether or not tech moves us towards a better world and consensus on the values of society.   More

Government

Can Government Get a Better Grip on Tech?

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"I'm very worried," says Neelie Kroes, who has served as a vice president of the European Commission since 2010. "The changes in technology nowadays are so fast that we have to change our mindset. This is my biggest frustration in the commission. It takes so much time for governments to know what is at stake. We can't consult ten times about issues like we did in former times." Kroes's concerns are widely shared, especially in the United States. Says Steve Case, who spends as much time as any major tech leader working with leaders of both parties in Washington: "The pace of innovation continues to accelerate and outstrip the ability of governments to react."   More

Bio & Life Sciences

Synthetic Biology’s Future Assembled in Boston Last Weekend

iGEM 2014 participants. (Photo; 2014.igem.org)

iGEM challenges multidisciplinary student teams to solve real-world problems with entirely new biological systems that they design and build from interchangeable sequences of DNA. The assembly last Monday marked the final segment of the 2014 International Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) competition, and the culmination of a weekend of intense bonding, as well as dancing and drinking, among the world’s most brilliant young bioengineers.   More

E-Commerce Global Tech

Birthing an Enabling Economy in Tourism

The peak of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania (image via Shutterstock)

Access to a marketplace is the first way digital technology empowers more people to conduct commerce. Transformative companies like eBay, Airbnb, and Etsy have gained incredible competitive edges in product-based commerce by giving individuals and small businesses access to a global audience of buyers, and the tools to transact safely online. At AnyRoad, we call the intersection of the marketplace and these tools the "enabling economy."   More

Global Tech Techonomy Events

Cyborgs from Sierra Leone: Polymath David Sengeh Brings Prosthetics to the People

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David Sengeh tells me he'll have to delay our phone interview. “I am sorry to do this but there’s a last minute need for me to attend an Ebola meeting.” Sengeh is a multi-faceted kind of guy. After all, before he started designing prosthetics, he did vaccine research. He grew up in Sierra Leone, where the Ebola epidemic has been harshest. So the 27-year-old MIT PhD student, biomedical engineer and inventor doesn't hesitate to take a few hours away from talking to Techonomy, not to mention writing his dissertation, looking for a job, leading a youth foundation, designing clothes, making music or playing soccer.   More

Analytics & Data Global Tech

How the People Are Taking Over the World

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The tool that we most use is data itself. We start to think of ourselves as data vessels. We are data. A new philosophy (dataism) is emerging that says people become the data they use and the companies that make filters also become part of one big, non-linear, complex adaptive dataset. One day it will be self-organizing thanks to new mathematical approaches we will pluck out of machine learning.   More

Startup Culture

Running Scared? Big Companies Increase Innovation Spending

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VC money is funding aggressive newcomers like Uber and Airbnb, and aims to create the next Teslas, Facebooks and Googles. Insurgent startups seem to be targeting every industry and even inventing new ones. The startups are wielding the weapons of the Internet—cloud, mobile, social, and data analytics—and deftly taking advantage of connectivity and the flattened business environment it enables. As we enter the most disruptive period in business history, established companies with deep pockets—the ones you might call the "disruptees"—are waking up and determined to fight back. Many are refocusing their own efforts to innovate and stay relevant. The result is a stunning range of initiatives.   More

Business Partner Insights

How Discovery Fuels Corporate Growth

(Image via Shutterstock)

Cultivating a discovery mindset—one that is open to new approaches, encourages curiosity, and promotes a willingness to test and iterate—is the essential basis for all innovation. But embracing discovery is not always natural for an established organization. It can be a big culture shift to really commit to identifying new and bold ideas—and yes, falling has to be accepted as an important part of the journey.   More

Techonomy Events

Ford’s Don Butler on Connectivity in Cars

How can connectivity make for a better driving experience? At our Techonomy Detroit conference at Wayne State University, Ford’s Don Butler talked about the ways the 111-year-old auto company is leveraging connectivity to make its vehicles more attractive to consumers. Increased connectivity—whether it’s beamed in via AM radio, brought in by syncing the vehicle with smart devices, or built into the vehicle itself through smart-computing platforms—is allowing drivers to be truly mobile, Butler said.   More

Government

How Democracy Works Is Innovating Government from the Outside In

Voting at a town hall meeting in Calais, Vermont (image via Shutterstock)

A federal election is one of the most logistically challenging business models you can imagine: it’s a business that’s open only one day a year, staffed almost entirely by temps (practically volunteers) with limited advance training. Would-be customers have to sign up days or weeks in advance, but everything is still first-come, first-serve. Oh, and there’s zero margin for error. No wonder the election administrator’s prayer is “Lord, let this election not be close.”   More

Healthcare Partner Insights

Fixing the Growing Problem of Enterprise Healthcare

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There is a disease that touches nearly every American, no matter their age or where they live. It can’t be cured by doctors, and no lab is working on a vaccine. The disease is the healthcare system itself. It strikes U.S. businesses with out-of-control costs and directly affects more than half of all Americans—those who rely on their employers for health coverage. But there’s hope that technology may help us cure our broken, dysfunctional healthcare system and enable businesses to turn this crippling expense into a strategic advantage.   More

Keen On

KeenON: “Innovators” Author Walter Isaacson

Walter Isaacson, the biographer of great men like Ben Franklin, Albert Einstein, and Steve Jobs, has now turned to the history of the digital revolution. But rather than the story of genius, Isaacson’s "The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution," is actually a narrative of collaboration between talented people. Beginning with the remarkable relationship between Charles Babbage and Ida Lovelace in the middle of the 19th century, Isaacson sees the story of the digital revolution in terms of collaboration.   More

Global Tech

Philippine Startup Takes on Global Radiologist Shortage

Livetrack's Manilla reading center

Many developing countries don’t have enough doctors to meet their citizens’ healthcare needs. Radiologists are particularly hard to find in many places, but Lifetrack Medical Systems, a digital healthcare startup based in the Philippines, wants to improve the situation with innovative software and services. Radiologists play an important role in medical systems everywhere. As specialists in the use of imaging techniques to see inside patients’ bodies, they support physicians in a wide range of specialties, from orthopedics to obstetrics.   More

Jobs Techonomy Events

Indiegogo’s Danae Ringelmann on Making Tech More Inclusive

After Google released the demographic data of its employees in May, a slew of other Internet giants followed suit, reaffirming a troubling truth: the tech industry is largely male and largely white. At September's Techonomy Detroit conference at Wayne State University, Indiegogo co-founder Danae Ringelmann talked about the diversity divide and what is needed to close it. “Only 3 to 13 percent of the venture-backed companies are run by women,” she said. “If you look at Indiegogo, which is an equal-opportunity funding playing field, and you see that 47 percent of all campaigns that reach their funding target are run by women, that conversation about why venture capital is unequal is almost obsolete.”   More