Business Community Insights Security & Privacy

Delaware Drives Blockchain Innovation

Delaware is the corporate home to the biggest tech companies and many others in the Fortune 500, but it wants to continue to innovate in the services and tools that it offers companies. So the state is breaking new ground in regulation by facilitating the use of blockchain technology for record keeping and other purposes. On August 1st, the state's initial blockchain law goes into effect.   More

Business Security & Privacy Society

Are Connected Toys Worth the Risk?

Children's toys and rooms are quickly becoming connected, like just about everything else. Parents may find monitors useful and talking toys a merciful distraction, but is this new digital world safe? Big companies like Mattel, whose Hello Barbie is illustrated here, may handle the responsibilities, but the raft of startups creeping toward our children's lives may be another matter.   More

Media & Marketing Security & Privacy

Brands, Too, Get Attacked in an Era of Conflict & Terror

Today terrorism is sadly becoming an ongoing challenge. Even as people and communities suffer, brands are also newly challenged. One of the London terrorists wore a jersey from football team Arsenal, which was widely noted in coverage. If we are now in an era of constant conflict, what can companies do to mitigate the risks?   More

Finance Security & Privacy

Talking with Tezos Co-Creator Kathleen Breitman

Kathleen Breitman is person of the hour. Her company developed Tezos, a new blockchain-based cryptocurrency whose ongoing fundraising has raised over $200 million since July 1. We talked to her about why she thinks this is the way to make a better internet, and a better world.   More

Analytics & Data Articles We Like Government Security & Privacy

“Omigod!”…and other Exclamations Upon Reading WSJ’s Piece on Facial Recognition in China

Do you want your photo flashed on a sign at an intersection? If not, don't jaywalk in China. Leave aside what happens if you're a dissident traveling in a new region. Here's a headline the WSJ used for this must-read article: "The All-Seeing Surveillance State Feared in the West is a Reality in China."   More

Community Insights Security & Privacy The Internet

Will Your Next Password Be a Brainwave?

Secure internet authentication with today's technology is more and more difficult. Even two-factor authentication is not enough. But at UC Berkeley, the next frontier in biometrics-based security is emerging: meet passthoughts—your brainwaves as an identifier, unique to an individual yet changeable anytime.   More

Global Tech Government Security & Privacy

Manchester, Trump in Saudi Arabia, and Fighting Terrorism in an Online Age

The horrors of terrorism are again vividly seared on our consciousness, after the vicious bombing at a concert in Manchester. Meanwhile, President Trump has rightly put combatting terrorism at the top of his policy agenda. His recent trip overseas demonstrated some of what that means.   More

Analytics & Data Finance Security & Privacy

The Fin-ternet of Things: Connecting Everything Means Rethinking Money

The coming world of the Internet of Everything means driverless cars making per-minute toll payments, lightbulbs that pick an energy vendor, IP royalties paid by devices themselves in real time, and investment decisions made by robo-advisors. This more efficient world will mean changes for banks, investment, and the way all of us live.   More

Security & Privacy

Hello Barbie Hijacked, as Techonomy 2016 Foreshadowed

At Techonomy 2016, panelists revealed shocking security risks associated with embedding the internet in children’s toys. The fear that these devices could be compromised appears to have been warranted. Over the past year, hackers have found a way to turn "Hello Barbie" into a listening device, and have held data ransom. Germany has even banned certain connected toys in their country.   More

Security & Privacy

Wary of Insecure IoT, Hotels Reconsider Old-Fashioned Keys

Today's Most-Techonomic-Article prize goes to the New York Times for this piece about a successful "ransomware" attack in January on a resort hotel in the Austrian Alps. A hacker infiltrated the hotel's network and succeeded in locking all the rooms, rendering keycards unusable. The owner relented and paid $1800. The DOJ estimates that such attacks happen 4,000 times a day in the U.S.   More

Security & Privacy Society Video

How AI and The Blockchain can Build Trust

Chief Technology & Innovation Officer at Accenture and Techonomy speaker Paul Daugherty shares his thoughts on Artificial Intelligence and the Blockchain during the World Economic Forum. Plus, a panel discussion on AI's impact on society hosted by David Kirkpatrick.   More

Managing Security & Privacy

Why Blockchains are For Every Company

The advent of the blockchain is much like the arrival of the Web. It will disrupt technology, society and business. What is today in a database will tomorrow be in a blockchain. Leaders who want to take advantage of this breakthrough need to understand several key points.   More

Government Security & Privacy Society

Of Tech and Trump

The tech industry continues to loom large in the responses to this year’s election and plays multiple interesting roles in its aftermath: Russia has been accused of "hacking" the election, Facebook has been forced to address its fake news issue, tech leaders met this week with president-elect Trump, and more.   More

Community Insights Internet of Things Security & Privacy

Terrorists Want Control of Your Car

The risks of terrorism are growing, as we all know. But with the rise of the Internet of Things comes an entirely new range of threats. After a brutal attack in Nice using a truck, it becomes obvious that many of the "things" around us in society can be weaponized. It's already been shown that hackers can take over connected vehicles remotely, and new developments make it even scarier. Venture capitalist and security expert Yoav Lietersdorf explains just how bad this could become, and some of the ways we might fight the risks.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Security & Privacy

How Microbes Could Help Track Criminals

In the not-distant future, crime scene analysts will be gathering a lot more than DNA. The microbiome, or the universe of bacteria and other microbes that live in and on us, is the latest target in forensics. DNA evidence can be hard to find at a crime scene, but criminals (and all of us) have trouble keeping microbes to themselves.   More

Internet of Things Security & Privacy

Why We Can’t Use Things to Secure the Internet of Things

Marc Andreessen first famously wrote “software is eating the world” five years ago, and now software is transforming entire industries. But when it comes to securing digital transactions, the world mostly still relies on hardware. But as we we all transact more and more through connected devices, this hardware way of securing mobile commerce simply won't suffice.   More

Healthcare Security & Privacy

Can We Stop Cybercrime in Healthcare?

New digital health technologies offer seemingly boundless promise to extend and improve our lives. Yet they also expose us to a growing array of security risks that require urgent attention from companies, consumers, and regulators everywhere. Data theft is one of the biggest risks. As data bursts from the seams of healthcare IT systems and consumer health apps, cybercriminals are having a field day.   More

Global Tech Security & Privacy

Welcome to the Splinternet

Donald Trump has referred to "closing" the Internet in areas where the U.S. has enemies, while China's president, Xi Jinping, reasserted last week that each state has a sovereign right to control what its citizens can and can't do in cyberspace. Russia believes a state should control "its" Internet. A European Union regulation determines how non-EU companies can market to or monitor EU individuals. That four such distinct political cultures could all reach the same conclusion suggests that the days of a universal Internet are numbered.   More

Opinion Security & Privacy Society

Are We Ready for Techno-Social Engineering?

Companies like Facebook and Google are developing new technologies to mine our data, to assess who we are and what we want, and – to hear the Internet giants tell it – deliver elegantly tailored experiences that help us better understand and interact with the world around us. David Lazer, an authority on social networks at Northeastern University, refers to it as the rise of the social algorithm and says it's an epic paradigm shift fraught with social and policy implications. Cardozo School of Law’s Brett Frischmann calls it techno-social engineering.   More

Analytics & Data Internet of Things Security & Privacy

How Good Guys Can Win the Cyberwars

When it comes to the cyberwars, are good guys or bad guys winning? I moderated a panel at Techonomy 2015 that explored this question. The answer isn’t a simple yes or no – and in light of the recent events in Paris, the question of our security feels even more critical. The industrialization of cybercrime is upon us. Today’s criminals are networked and well equipped. All organizations must prepare themselves for a series of battles.   More