Government Internet of Things Learning

Giant Texas School System Makes a Giant Internet Commitment

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The Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District, with 114,000 students, is decidedly Texas-sized. But the district's latest project lives up to that grand scale: updating its entire digital network to bring 100G broadband internet access to every square inch of its classrooms and offices. Cypress-Fairbanks CTO Frankie Jackson is on the front line of an emerging challenge in education.   More

Arts & Culture Learning Manufacturing

Five Ways AR and VR Will Improve Our Current Reality

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A flood of investments into the new tools of reality continues to fuel innovation. Virtual and augmented reality, from the original Google Glass to the latest Oculus Rift, has continually shaped the technology market,and will grow substantially in the coming years. AR and VR will impact the world around us in a number of interesting—and beneficial—ways. Here are five things to look forward to.   More

Government Jobs Learning

The Commerce Department’s Digital Economy Agenda

U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker onstage at Techonomy 2015 with David Kirkpatrick.

U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker spoke Nov. 9 at Techonomy 2015, and announced for the first time her department's Digital Economy Agenda. Alan Davidson, who oversees this effort, wrote this piece to explain it.   More

Learning Society Techonomy Events

If Kids Were Bonds They’d be the Backbone of the World Economy

Meta Learning takes a bigger-picture view of what kids really need. If we focused more on it our entire society might be transformed.

If investment into a child’s education accrued interest like a monetary bond, the payouts would be beyond any known interest rate. We know what works; our problem is that we don’t implement the findings. The research is filled with examples of impactful interventions, ranging from stress reduction to reading promotion to mindset and grit, or tenacity, development. We refer to these as meta-learning. It can significantly affect life-outcomes such as general cognitive ability, socioemotional competency, creativity, and curiosity.   More

Jobs Learning Partner Insights

How Tech Can Help Remake the American Job Market

The skills gap session at Techonomy Detroit. From left are moderator Martha Laboissiere of McKinsey & Co., Matt Anchin of Monster, author Wan-Lae Cheng, and Charlene Li of Altimeter.

Too many Americans face an uncertain economic future. The question is whether they will have the skills to maintain a career. Our economy is changing, but our labor markets and our institutions are not keeping pace. Now the Markle Foundation has partnered with employers and leaders in Colorado and Phoenix to build Rework America Connected, an innovative effort to reinforce and expand existing workforce development strategies.   More

Cities Learning Partner Insights Society

How City Programs Can Broaden Access to the Innovation Economy

The Englewood Blue accelerator provides training and internships in a historically-disadvantaged Chicago neighborhood.

A wide range of programs for entrepreneurship, training, and mentoring are emerging in cities around the United States. They hope to revitalize historically disadvantaged communities, broaden economic opportunity, and make cities better places. It's a 21st century brand of governance, politics, and civic engagement.   More

Cities Learning Society

Making Detroit a Movement: The Power of Narrative

Building a narrative for Detroit

Throughout history, certain cities at certain moments in time have had an outsized impact. Think about Detroit’s future, built on a rich legacy of innovation and diversity, in terms of a movement—of individuals as well as companies, nonprofits, and public sector institutions. What would really help is a well-crafted narrative.   More

Learning

What if We Treated our Children with the Respect They Deserve?

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If only our country focused on finding the potential in its children, amazing things could happen, as this inspiring article from The New York Times shows. When a committed philanthropist spent a relatively small amount of money, $11 million over 21 years, it completely turned around student educational attainment in a mid-sized predominantly African-American town in Florida. It also had a major positive impact on the community itself. The key was aggressive early-childhood education, along with training for parents.   More

Learning

How Tech Fights Problems Caused by Tech

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We live in a time of increasingly obsessive worry that our lives are being worsened by the tech that surrounds us. We are sacrificing our privacy, we hear, as we dwell online. We don't spend enough time with real people and too much instead in virtual interaction. We suffer from shortening attention spans. And on and on. However, there are likely to be endless ways to employ tech to combat the effects of tech that we decide we really do not like. This article in The Chronicle of Higher Education is about tools to reduce distraction while taking online courses. It points toward what's possible. Careful research on students showed that using software to give them incentives not to stop studying really worked.   More

Learning

Robots for All

(Image via Leesburg Today)

“Most robotics kits are hundreds or even thousands of dollars, so we wanted to give kids who don’t have that kind of money a chance build their own robots,” Ritvik Jayakumar tells Leesburg Today. The really cool part? Jayakumar isn’t a Silicon Valley whiz (yet) or a crowd-funded entrepreneur (yet). He’s one of nine Ashburn, Virginia, middle-school students on “Team Gear UP!” competing at the FIRST Championship taking place this week in St. Louis, Missouri. One of the program’s elements tasked teams to come up with an innovative solution to improve learning around the world, and before the team knew it, the Craft-A-Bot kit was born.   More

Global Tech Learning

Educators Unite to Build Vietnam’s Tech Talent

Vietnamese student learns game design. (Photo courtesy of Everest Education, Ho Chi Minh City)

Vietnam’s tech industry is booming. For growth to continue, however, Vietnam must cultivate an increasingly skilled tech workforce and develop new capabilities in research, problem solving, and client service. But building such capabilities requires a major mindset shift at educational institutions, which typically emphasize rote learning over problem solving. Such a change will also challenge companies that opt for rigid hierarchy over the flatter structures that encourage creativity and initiative. To overcome these challenges, many Vietnamese tech companies are partnering with educators, NGOs, and government agencies. Although some companies still think of Vietnam as simply a place for cheap labor, the forward-thinking ones know the country has deeper potential.   More

Jobs Learning

Augmented Reality: Enabling Learning Through Rich Context

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In his 1992 novel “Snow Crash,” Neal Stephenson envisioned the Metaverse: a three-dimensional manifestation of the Internet in which people interact and collaborate via digitally-constructed avatars. In the decades since, technology has advanced to the point where such a place no longer seems like science fiction. Stephenson’s Metaverse is a virtual reality space, a completely immersive computer-generated experience whose users have minimal ability to interact with the real world. In contrast to this fictional vision is today’s burgeoning field of augmented reality (AR), a technology that superimposes visual information or other data in front of one’s view of the real world.   More

Global Tech Learning

Emerging Market Medical Education Goes Digital

HIV specialists in Vietnam use video conferencing to train local health workers. Photo courtesy of HAIVN.

A shortage of skilled health workers is an acute and ongoing problem in many emerging markets. Weak medical education systems bear a major part of the blame. But a big opportunity for rapid progress has emerged as online medical education becomes increasingly common. Doctors and nurses in even the poorest countries can now get better training.   More

Davos 2015 Learning

Davos 2015: Going to School’s Lisa Heydlauff on Empowering Young Entrepreneurs in India

Going to School CEO Lisa Heydlauff joins Hub Culture at the World Economic Forum Davos 2015. Heydlauff discusses her organization's mission to empower poor children in India with entrepreneurial skills.   More

Davos 2015 Learning

Davos 2015: Codecademy’s Zach Sims on Creating New Jobs

Codecademy's Zach Sims visits Hub Culture at the World Economic Forum Davos 2015. Sims discusses the power of technology to create new jobs and new job categories, and to educate workers for those jobs.   More

Davos 2015 Learning

Davos 2015: Berkeley Psychologist Alison Gopnik on Computer Learning

UC Berkeley Professor of Psychology Alison Gopnik visits Hub Culture at the World Economic Forum Davos 2015. Gopnik explores the idea of computer learning and designing computers to "think" like a child.   More

Davos 2015 Learning

Davos 2015: MIT’s Susan Hockfield on Interactive Open Courseware

MIT President Emerita Susan Hockfield joins Hub Culture at the World Economic Forum Davos 2015. Hockfield shares her thoughts on MIT's interactive open courseware and its partnership with the World Economic Forum.   More

Learning

The Markle Foundation’s Philip Zelikow on Reconfiguring Education for the Digital Age

“Imagine an education system that’s built around unleashing the power of the individual,” says Philip Zelikow, professor of history at the University of Virginia and visiting managing director at the Markle Foundation. Zelikow envisions a new paradigm where someone can get the training and education they need even if it means starting classes in the middle of a traditional semester. Does that mean students will just pop online to get the credits they need? Not necessarily. “The future may be more likely a mixture of online plus people,” says Zelikow, with “navigators” helping to guide students through online options and pair them with real-world tutors.   More

Global Tech Learning

Computer Science in Vietnam: Counting Down to the Hour of Code

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Events surrounding this week's Hour of Code coincide with Computer Science Education week. Vietnam will have 26 different hosts, ranging from universities and high schools to private corporations. However, only two of the participating high schools are local schools under the Department of Education. The remaining are international or private schools. But don’t be too concerned about the lack of participation from public secondary schools. In fact, the rest of the world is really only catching up to Vietnam, whose public schools are known for introducing computer science into the curriculum at a very early age.   More

Jobs Learning Techonomy Events

Can We Train America to Train its Workers?

By 2022 the U.S. is projected to need 1.4 million new programmers, but at the current rate only 400,000 IT grads will emerge to fill them. How America tackles this disparity will help determine its ongoing global competitiveness and the economic success of all Americans. Codecademy has developed innovative training tools, and the White House is turning to this issue with great urgency. In this session from our Sept. 16 Techonomy Detroit conference, Techonomy's David Kirkpatrick talks to Brian Forde of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Codecademy CEO Zach Sims about how to close the looming skills gap.   More