Analytics & Data Cities Internet of Things

Smart Neighborhood Data Can Help Small Business

An MIT student installs sensors in Downtown Crossing, Boston, as part of  an effort to generate data to help small businesses. (Photo courtesy GoDaddy.com)

As cities turn themselves into smart cities, a critical component is small business. GoDaddy joined with the Social Computing group at the MIT Media Lab to install sensors in Boston’s Downtown Crossing neighborhood to collect data and use it to help small businesses. Info about pedestrian and vehicle movement, air quality and noise will be combined with retail information in hopes of helping them compete and thrive. I'll talk about this at Techonomy NYC.   More

Arts & Culture Internet of Things Society

Reflections from Ross: Art, Culture and Tech

Paola Antonelli of MoMA speaking at Creative Tech Week in New York. We, too, think of her as a goddess. (photo Simone Ross)

Last week DLD was in New York for their annual shindig, and the city was treated to its first Creative Tech Week. CTW brought together artists, designers, makers, creators, entrepreneurs, developers and new media folk to show off their work. And DLD, a wonderful marriage of German and American sensibilities, included two museum curators who spoke about some digital challenges facing art.   More

Cities Internet of Things Techonomy Events

Program Director Ross on Techonomy NYC—One Month Away!

On Thursday May 26 we host Techonomy NYC. Our diverse program covers everything from finance and banking to health, smart cities, crowd-based capitalism and the impact of tech on culture and trust. We’ve got 27 speakers, including Autodesk CEO Carl Bass, Data & Society’s danah boyd, IBM’s Blockchain expert Jerry Cuomo, Facebook’s Carolyn Everson, Bayer head of digital development Jessica Federer, U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx, FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, GE Digital CEO Bill Ruh, Betterment CEO Jon Stein and NYC CTO Minerva Tantoco. Join us!   More

Analytics & Data Internet of Things Partner Insights

Why Verizon is Betting on The Internet of Things

image by  Bee-Teerapol, courtesy Shutterstock

The "Internet of Things" is the next big move as the economy goes digital. Measuring and acting on signals generated by everything from steps individuals take to the amount of water flowing over a dam, a vast new industry is emerging to bring more efficiency to society. In a comprehensive new report released Tuesday, Verizon outlines why this Internet of Things (IoT) transition is critical to business. The company has products, a platform, and enormous enthusiasm for this transformation.   More

Internet of Things Security & Privacy

Why We Can’t Use Things to Secure the Internet of Things

Hardware doesn't work to secure digital mobile transactions. Photo: Danai Khampiranon via Shutterstock

Marc Andreessen first famously wrote “software is eating the world” five years ago, and now software is transforming entire industries. But when it comes to securing digital transactions, the world mostly still relies on hardware. But as we we all transact more and more through connected devices, this hardware way of securing mobile commerce simply won't suffice.   More

Internet of Things Mobile Transportation

The Next Industries to Be Transformed by Tech: Shipping and Mining

Illustration courtesy of Rolls-Royce

Mining and shipping are industries thus far almost wholly unreconstructed by mobile tech. But soon, remote-control earthmovers, sensor-connected containers, and network-linked augmented reality goggles will change both unalterably. The Internet of Things (IoT) is going underground and out to sea.   More

Healthcare Internet of Things Partner Insights

Philips CEO van Houten on Digital Health’s Future

Philips CEO Frans van Houten was a big presence at the giant recent HIMSS healthcare & tech conference in Las Vegas. HIMSS is where the digital world meets the world of health, and Philips aims increasingly to be a central player in that conjunction. I interviewed van Houten briefly on the show floor and separately conducted a lengthy interview with him on stage. He has five lessons he wants healthcare to learn from other industries.   More

Analytics & Data Internet of Things

Reflections from Ross: On Drones and CubeSats

Image via Shutterstock

Oceans cover about 71 percent of the earth’s surface. We think of everything as constantly connected, yet in a world where we are drowning in oceans of data the ocean itself is a data dead zone. But there’s a transformation underway. CubeSats and drones are changing not just the way we get access to information about what’s happening on the surface of our planet—from cities to forests to the middle of nowhere—but the frequency at which we get that information.   More

Internet of Things Mobile Partner Insights

Why Ford’s Work with Amazon will Echo Widely

Soon you'll be able to talk to your Ford car with questions similar to what you'd ask a person, thanks to a new alliance with Amazon and its Echo voice interface system. (Photo courtesy Ford)

Amazon's Echo ambient voice interface device is a breakthrough with growing implications for the future of computing. And the relationship developing between Amazon and Ford to add vehicle-related functions to Echo's cloud service is one more piece of evidence to show how vast Echo's potential could be. Soon you will be able simply to speak in your living room to turn on your car, set its heater for 72, or perform all sorts of other tasks relating to your vehicle.   More

Government Internet of Things

The Internet of Things: Citizen Friend or Foe?

Image via Shutterstock

Two hundred forty years ago, our founding fathers could never have imagined the revolutionary tech we’d have today to engage with our government programs and officials. On this Presidents' Day 2016, the citizen-engagement landscape includes developments that range from e-voting to online petitioning, which are making it easier than ever for everyday people to interact with their city, state, and national governments. Today, the Internet of Things is emerging as another way for citizens to talk with their governments.   More

Internet of Things Techonomy Events

How Should We Think About the Internet of Things?

Sara Gardner of Hitachi Data Systems explains why we need to take a bigger-picture view of the Internet of Things.   More

Analytics & Data Business Internet of Things

Balancing Privacy and User Experience: The Challenge of the Digital Age

Illustration for Techonomy by Clara Kirkpatrick

If companies fail to meet heightened data protection standards and other growing customer expectations around privacy and respect for their data, they may be fined, lose customer trust, and possibly put the entire company at risk. This is especially true in Europe. At the same time, companies that lose sight of the customer experience will not be successful long term. The conundrum is a kind of “digital Scylla and Charybdis”.   More

Global Tech Internet of Things

Post-CES, Four Questions about the Internet of Things

Connected refrigerators, bras that monitor your heart rate, and, of course, autonomous vehicles were the kinds of things CES attendees focused on this year. It now seems inevitable that more or less everything will eventually be connected, and that raises new security, business, and technical questions for manufacturers, network providers, marketers, and consumers– the IoT ecosystem. What a few days scrambling around Las Vegas got me thinking.   More

Global Tech Internet of Things

The Internet of CES Things

At left, the Amazon Echo that sits in my living room. As Tim O'Reilly explains, it is a profound breakthrough in how we interact with computing that will shape the future as much as the smartphone did before it.

CES was a gigantic, if predictable, letdown when it comes to "consumer electronics." Everything seemed incremental. People ask each other "What's the most interesting thing you've seen?" My answer was an announcement not a device--Amazon's deal with Ford to put its Echo "Alexa" technology inside of cars. It was the Internet of Things that loomed large in the background--not to make connected toasters but to transform society with connected efficiency.   More

Global Tech Internet of Things Opinion

Thoughts on the Plane to CES

IMG_6570

Every January just after New Year's, as if to force upon recently idle strivers the urgency of redoubling their labors, converge hundreds of thousands of tech-focused leaders, strategists, inventors, financiers, retailers, and journalists. CES is American tech's biggest trade show, fiesta, business meeting, glad-handing exercise, walking course, and source of both elation and frustration. Says Slava Rubin, CEO of Indiegogo, who we ran into at our hotel's check-in: "CES is one giant networking event."   More

Bio & Life Sciences Global Tech Internet of Things

Techonomy’s Top Articles for 2015

At Techonomy we put on conferences and publish articles and videos. Our most popular articles this year tackled the conceptual problem with the Apple Watch, the Human side of the Internet of Things, how consumer genomics empowers consumers, tech and artificial intelligence progress in Ethiopia, and the need for the biotech industry to step up its game in communicating to the general public. It's a good flavor of the range of issues and topics that fascinate and motivate us. Keep with us in 2016 for much much more!   More

Analytics & Data Healthcare Internet of Things

How Mobile Tech Can Tame Diabetes

In Manila, commuting may be colorful but it can take forever. Inactive people are prone to diabetes, a growing scourge there. New apps can help. (photo Shutterstock)

Over three-quarters of the world’s diabetics live in low- and middle-income countries. It is one of the world’s leading causes of death and disability and afflicts over 400 million people. Many of the most promising new technologies being developed to address this global epidemic are low-cost mobile solutions especially suited for emerging markets. Their impact is likely to be felt strongly in coming years.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Energy & Green Tech Internet of Things

Will Programming Plants Feed the World?

This indoor farm in Japan is state-of-the-art, growing salad greens at high speed but high quality. (photo courtesy Philips)

By 2025 food shortages and price fluctuations could be a thing of the past, everywhere. New technologies for cultivating plants indoors could feed eight billion people, save energy and dramatically reduce pollution. But beyond the growing enthusiasm for "vertical farms" or "plant factories" lies the potential to alter elements in the recipe for these environments to create plants and foods with no precedent–more nutritious, hardy, or tasty–or whatever other characteristics we decide to favor.   More

Analytics & Data Internet of Things Security & Privacy

How Good Guys Can Win the Cyberwars

Cybersecurity session at Techonomy 2015– moderator Michael Patsalos-Fox far right. Others, from left: Rowan Trollope of Cisco,
Victoria A. Espinel of the Business Software Alliance,
Nicole Eagan of Darktrace,
Special Agent David Johnson of the FB,I
Brian Kelly of Rackspace, and Elena Kvochko of Barclays.

When it comes to the cyberwars, are good guys or bad guys winning? I moderated a panel at Techonomy 2015 that explored this question. The answer isn’t a simple yes or no – and in light of the recent events in Paris, the question of our security feels even more critical. The industrialization of cybercrime is upon us. Today’s criminals are networked and well equipped. All organizations must prepare themselves for a series of battles.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Energy & Green Tech Internet of Things

Food Production in a Technology-driven Economy

The Open Agriculture initiative at MIT Media Lab recently put food computers like this one in several Boston-area classrooms so students can experiment with "climate recipes" for growing plants.

The Open Agriculture Initiative at the MIT Media Lab aims to drive a paradigm shift from the industrial to the networked age of agricultural production—giving rise to a computationally-based food systems revolution that will account for the ecological, environmental, economic, and societal implications of producing food. Making agricultural practices radically transparent will improve access to fresh, nutritious foods, reduce spoilage and waste, and create communities built on a shared platform and shared data.   More