Healthcare Techonomy Events Video

Rachel Maguire on What to Expect in 2026

Rachel Maguire, Research Director at the Institute for the Future, gives a glimpse into the future of health tech ecosystem. Where is all this data, analytics and the cloud taking us? How will AI, automation, blockchain and robotics impact healthcare? How will these innovations integrate into standards of care, and how broad will the impact be?   More

Government Healthcare

What Trump Means for Healthcare in Asia

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Trump has famously declared that he would move to withdraw from the TPP on his first day as president. But studies show that the agreement would be good for both US and Asian healthcare. Plus, America's habit of bringing investment, ideas, and improved standards of care to Asian healthcare might be in jeopardy.   More

Healthcare Techonomy Events

Kaiser and Philips Health Chiefs on Obamacare and U.S. Medicine’s Future at Techonomy

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With all the uncertainty around the Affordable Care Act, the Techonomy 2016 audience listened attentively to two experts in the field. Among other predictions, the speakers said digital health will unquestionably play a major role in healthcare moving forward, that the ACA will be harder to repeal than many might expect, and that reimbursement strategies are likely to shift to a more outcomes-based model.   More

Healthcare Techonomy Events

At Techonomy 2016, a Vision of Disrupted Healthcare

Techonomy16 conference in Half Moon Bay, California, Thursday, November 10, 2016.  (Photo by Paul Sakuma Photography) www.paulsakuma.com

Medicine will be unrecognizable in the coming decades, with technology changes leading to better care at home, vanishing hospitals, and doctors who can monitor patients’ activity and health between visits. Leaders in various sectors who spoke at Techonomy 2016 contributed to the futuristic picture.   More

Healthcare Internet of Things Partner Insights

Unlocking Healthcare’s Data

Measuring ourselves with devices around us will make us healthier. (Photo courtesy Philips)

We need technology to bring new solutions to global healthcare. And the potential of the Internet of Things is just beginning. Computing power, miniaturization, mobile, big data, the cloud, and social networks are driving this critical trend. Almost two in five are projected to use wearable monitoring devices by 2019. The resulting data can make the world dramatically healthier.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

The Three-Parent Baby Is Not as Weird as You Think

This new experimental technique for avoiding diseased babies is not as far removed from the well-accepted process In Vitro fertilization, shown here, as many reports would suggest.

People may have a "yuck response" when they hear about this new experimental technique for creating healthy babies. But it isn't as huge a leap from what we're used to as most reports would suggest, as Techonomy's genomics expert explains. Like a top medical source she quotes here, Salisbury will be continuing this conversation at Techonomy 2016 on November 10.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Ethical Issues Abound with Fast-Growing Prenatal Genetic Testing

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In the last few years, the standard tests for fetal abnormalities have been largely replaced with new genetic tests. Since they launched, traditional procedures that confer a small risk of miscarriage have dropped by about 70 percent. Now we face a big ethical issue: these tests reveal much more about future diseases than those they replaced. What information should parents know, and what can and should they do about it?   More

Government Healthcare

Data Sharing: Key Challenge for Cancer Moonshot (& American Health)

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If we're going to make progress in healthcare, we need to connect up the data. A report for the national Cancer Moonshot initiative highlights the massive problem disconnected databases have become in the fight against cancer. But this problem isn't limited to cancer. The well-intentioned HIPAA act of 1996, for example, included strict privacy controls that have turned into a problem for medical research generally.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

New Study: Meditation Literally Changes our Genes

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People who practice meditation know it resets the mind and body, and there have been claims about its healing powers for centuries. Now scientific evidence backs them up. Researchers recently found that meditation does more than just relieve stress. It can literally change our DNA.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare Techonomy Events

Reflections from Ross: Why “Genetically Modified Everything” is so important to what we do at Techonomy

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The global biotech market is estimated to have a value of $604.40 billion by 2020. Techonomy program director Ross explains how central the theme is to us, and a bit of her own history of fascination with it. This year at TE16 we’re continuing this exploration into the industries being changed by life science, the technologies, the benefits and yes, the controversies.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Beyond Human: Life Extension, Enhancement, and the Future

Eve Herold's new book, published by Macmillan.

If artificial organs, miniature robots, and advanced medications could keep you healthy, would you want to live for hundreds of years? Author Eve Herold's new book "Beyond Human" argues that we might as well get used to these ideas, because they are inevitably coming. Reviewer Salisbury finds this an important overview of a rapidly-developing field of medical science, but is not yet ready to join the immortals herself.   More

Analytics & Data Healthcare

Cloud Software Fights Zika in Florida, Zip Code by Zip Code

The Zika virus is spreading in the Wynwood neighborhood in Miami, shown here. A new effort uses cloud software to identify potential victims and alert them to preventive measures. (photo Shutterstock)

As the Zika virus begins a worrisome spread in Florida, cloud-based healthcare services company athenahealth is using big data to seek out those in danger and then reach out. Working with local healthcare providers and a rich database of individuals, it has winnowed out 1850 people at serious risk and provided preventive information.   More

Healthcare Internet of Things Society

Watch Healthcare Improve as Runners Embrace Tech

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I joke sometimes with my running friends that we don’t take our watches on runs; our watches take us on runs. In June Facebook launched Moves, its own activity-tracking app. Facebook is just one of many companies that wants to know when you’re active. People who run are obsessed with statistics, and watches and wearables are becoming almost a must-have for runners. This technology may drive a revolution in healthcare.   More

Healthcare Society

Thanks to Social Media, Rare Progress on Rare Diseases

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Progress in rare diseases has always been painfully slow, partly because so few are affected that study is challenging. Now, with social media, patients are able to band together, giving critical mass to efforts like fundraising and clinical trial enrollment that might otherwise wither away.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Government Healthcare

Obama: Genetic Data + Precision Medicine Will Improve American Health

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Lost in a news cycle rife with heartbreak, the Obama administration made a major push last week for its Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI). Also referred to as personalized medicine, precision medicine is based on the idea of using a trove of genetic and clinical information to determine ahead of time which drugs will work best for which patients, at which doses, and in which combinations. It could be the first step in an important breakthrough for American health.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Business Healthcare

Consumers to Health Insurers: Keep it Simple

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The American healthcare markethas undergone a period of rapid change in recent years. Chief among these changes has been a general shift towards consumer choice, prompting the rollout of new tech products in a bid to entice customers. But a new study suggests the best way to win over consumers is to bring things back down to earth.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare Startup Culture

Funding, Coaching, and Data: StartUp Health Wants to Transform Healthcare

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Part incubator, part venture fund, part mentorship program, StartUp Health aims to create an ecosystem for digital health entrepreneurs. Backed by Steve Case, Mark Cuban, Jerry Levin, Esther Dyson, and GE Ventures, among others, five-year-old StartUp Health has 150 companies in its portfolio.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Global Tech Healthcare

The Superbugs are Coming. Data Science Can Help.

Thanks to miraculous advances in public health and medical science over the past century, we can prevent and treat many common microbial infections.Yet some in the health industry fear that may be changing. We misuse and overuse antimicrobial drugs on a massive scale, and the bad bugs are beginning to evolve new resistance mechanisms. Data science can play a central role in the fight against the looming global threat.   More

Analytics & Data Healthcare

Healthcare Needs a More Robust Feedback Loop

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As collective knowledge is shared, consumers become empowered – and more demanding. That kind of health care marketplace will reward and punish using similar criteria as in other industries. With more shared data, patients get the power to choose better doctors, bringing competition to a part of the healthcare market that has long avoided it.   More

Global Tech Healthcare Techonomy Events

Data-Driven Healthcare: Can it Help All Countries?

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Healthcare was a recurring theme of the Techonomy NYC conference in late May. In several sessions, the connection between an interconnected world and a healthier world emerged. Author Greene watched the conference from a hotel room in Singapore, and found both enlightening and disturbing connections to his own work on digital healthcare in emerging countries in Southeast Asia.   More