Techonomy Magazine: Future Healthcare, Indoor Agriculture, Design, Global Inclusion…

It's the fourth time Techonomy has published its print and digital magazine.

The latest issue of the print and digital Techonomy Magazine includes articles on topics ranging from how the emergence of genomic medicine challenges the American health care system to a deep look at how technologized indoor agriculture may remake not only what we eat but its environmental consequences as well. We look at the inclusive potential of the Blockchain, and sit down with Museum of Modern Art design curator Paola Antonelli. There are also sections with fascinating quotes from our Bio, Policy and Detroit conferences from earlier in the year.   More

Business Techonomy Events

Techonomy 2015- Magisto Interview with Sean Parker


Business Techonomy Events

Techonomy 2015- Magisto Interview with Terry Sejnowski

Terry Sejnowski an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical institute looks at the transference of manual tasks to machines and retraining the workforce via online education via MOOCs Massive Open Online Courses     More

Analytics & Data Business Jobs Society

Artificial Intelligence is Already Remaking Modern Businesses

We're all moving into a world where the key to success will be how people work with smart machines and artificial intelligence. (image courtesy Shutterstock)

Artificial intelligence (AI) technology heralds an opportunity and a challenge to business to harness new cognitive power. In an age of intelligent machines, effective executives must not only design organizations with the right metrics and interfaces between individuals and teams of people, but also between people and smart machines.   More

Business Jobs Techonomy Events

Beyond Tech’s “Pipeline Problem” towards Inclusive Meritocracies

Author Mather, who speaks at TE15, was on this panel on tech industry diversity at TE Detroit 2014 . From left, author Andrew Keen, Brian Forde (now MIT Media Lab, then at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy), SisterCode's Marlin Page, Google's Chris Genteel, Mather Unitive, and Indiegogo's Danae Ringelmann

In the year since I last attended Techonomy, we’ve seen major shifts in the workforce. In 2015, millennials became the largest labor force in the United States. The U.S. Government Accountability Office estimates 40.4% of the employed labor force are now in alternative work arrangements. Employers have to find new ways to attract and retain top talent for the horizontal, distributed workforce of the future. The session I’ll join on Nov. 9, "Scouting for Talent, Digging for Diversity," will explore the causes for today's business diversity shortcomings as well as ways tech is disrupting and rebuilding the structures of old.   More

5G Business

Ericsson CEO Hans Vestberg on the Next Phase in Wireless–5G

What comes after so-called 4G wireless, today’s highest-bandwidth systems (sometimes called LTE)? Even though only a small portion of smartphone users in a few countries so far have 4G, Ericsson, one of the telecoms industry’s leading tech providers, is already deep into planning the next phase. These 5G systems will differ dramatically from those today, […]   More

Business Video

When Everything Gets Connected, How Does it Transform the System?

Hans Vestberg, CEO of Ericsson, which makes much of the world’s wireless infrastructure, sees an even more connected world in our future. In this short excerpt of a conversation with Techonomy’s David Kirkpatrick, he explains that as more and more of our devices are online and interacting, and as mobile broadband dovetails with cloud services, […]   More

Business Techonomy Events

Techonomy 2015 Live Webcast

The transition to a technologized and interconnected society is more and more challenging for everyone, everywhere. We still need to keep amity and constructive human interaction as our supreme priority. That’s why we call the Techonomy 2015 conference “Re-Humanizing Society.” Here is where you’ll be able to watch the Livestream of the conference from its […]   More

Business Finance

VMware Tracking Stock Will Require Dell to Report Results

Michael Dell is a happy guy, even though he may have to report a few more numbers.

Amidst all the brouhaha over Dell’s $67 billion bid for EMC, one unremarked fact is that Dell will have to again begin reporting financial results to the SEC. Michael Dell happily rid himself of that onerous task almost two years ago. But this is a different and more energized Dell than the business that went private in 2013. Dell has managed to retain his operating scope and freedom of action, even as he leverages up the company with his name on the door.   More

Business Finance Security & Privacy

Attacked by Cyber Criminals? There’s Insurance For That

Insurance is emerging to protect against cyber crime, but the industry remains immature (as do company attitudes about protecting themselves).

Few threats are more on the minds of business leaders than cyber attacks and data breaches. Companies that have been attacked range from Barnes & Noble to Home Depot to J.P. Morgan to Staples, Sony and Target. Now a variety of big insurers have created policies and services to cover this new set of threats.   More

Analytics & Data Business Healthcare

Can Open Data Drive Innovative Healthcare?

Innovative Healthcare (image via Shutterstock)

As healthcare systems worldwide become increasingly digitized, medical scientists and health researchers have more data than ever. Yet much valuable health information remains locked in proprietary or hidden databases. A growing number of open data initiatives aim to change this, but it won’t be easy.   More

Business Jobs Techonomy Events Video

Techonomy Detroit 2015 Live Webcast

The impact of tech on the American economy, its cities and the transformation of the urban ecosystem shaped the agenda for our fourth annual one-day Techonomy Detroit conference. The social and economic evolution of our cities is being impacted every day by tech-driven change in every aspect of how we live and work. Be it advances in […]   More

Analytics & Data Business Cities Global Tech Transportation

A Less Congested Future: Technology for Moving People, Businesses, and Cities

Urban Engines so-called "space-time engine" can model cities like Sao Paulo, here, to analyze and optimize urban transportation.

Accelerating urbanization is leading to clogged transportation networks, but the clever use of data can smooth our city systems. Powerful tech tools—from the Internet of Moving Things to the computational and sensing capabilities of smartphones—can help reduce congestion. Modeling and data-driven systems will define the future of urban transport.   More

Business E-Commerce Finance

Is Banking’s Uber On The Horizon?

Banks that can't bring services to consumers in real time will have a hard time in coming years. (image via Shutterstock)

Banking faces enormous challenges. Government regulatory initiatives have forced banks to spend billions of dollars to stay in business, while limiting the profits that they can make. Meanwhile, the Internet has spawned numerous companies now taking away businesses like lending, brokerage, investment, payments and credit cards. The revenue base of banks is shrinking and their cost base is increasing. Enter the Millenials, used to conducting their lives through cell phones. They want to buy goods and services on their mobile device, and expect immediate gratification. The banks are just not prepared for all this.   More

Business Manufacturing Startup Culture

Will Makerspaces Jumpstart a New Industrial Revolution?

Making things at TechShop Palo Alto.

After I first visited TechShop in 2006, I hypothesized that if makers could be given access to the tools of the industrial revolution at a cost they could afford, they could change the world. Nine years later we have innumerable examples of how this access has revolutionized who gets to make things, what gets made, and where and how they do it. In other words, it changes the very nature of manufacturing in America.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Business

Can Hot Consumer Genomics Startup Helix Keep the FDA at Bay?

image from Shutterstock

A new company launched by the market leader in DNA sequencing aims to bring genomics to the masses. Helix, kicked off on August 18 with a capital injection of more than $100 million, appears to embrace a direct-to-consumer approach that hasn’t been seen since pioneer 23andMe's ready-to-mail spit kits. Given the FDA’s firm pushback against 23andMe, though, does Helix has a bright future?   More

Business Video

Citi Ventures’ Colella on Disruption and the Pace of Change

“Every industry…is ripe for some kind of disruption,” says Citi Ventures’ Vanessa Colella, a veteran investor and tech expert embedded in the heart of a major multinational financial institution. In this video interview, conducted by Techonomy at a recent dinner jointly hosted with Citi Ventures, Colella speaks about the challenges and opportunities for big companies […]   More


What Becoming Steve Jobs Taught Me About Management

GongTo /

Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli's Becoming Steve Jobs is an intimate portrait of Steve Jobs’ evolution. It is also, perhaps accidentally, one of the most insightful and instructive books on management I have ever read. While one may not typically think of a biography as a leadership or self-help book, Schlender and Tetzeli capture the kind of growth that all leaders should push themselves towards.   More


Who Wins in Innovation, the Big or the Small?

During a dinner hosted by Techonomy last month in New York, we asked a few of our guests to talk about the challenges of innovation at large companies. Even the big company people there recognize that smallness has its advantages. Startups are often able to move at a quicker pace, unburdened by the operational complexity that large companies often experience. They are able to “fail fast and be much more agile,” said Jud Linville, who runs Citi's credit card business.   More

Business Opinion

My Advice to Jack Dorsey

Anthony Correia /

What is the future of Twitter? With the departure of former CEO Dick Costolo and recent declines in the company's stock valuation, many users and investors are asking. Co-founder and now interim CEO Jack Dorsey is right to focus on the mass market now that the service so successfully has leaders like journalists and politicians on board. He seems to recognize that the dynamics of what drives these audiences are different. Yet Twitter’s power to create more influencers every day is a powerful basis upon which to build, in a culture where everyone has the potential to give voice to their thoughts. Tapping into this desire as a means to pull the mainstream, intelligently and responsibly, is not just a smart move but a necessary one as the world navigates an always-on sharing culture.   More