Arts & Culture

I Saw It on YouTube (So It Must Be True)

If it happened on YouTube, then must it be true? That was the intriguing observation of one attendee, the writer on digital life Sarah Granger, at a recent FutureCast event dedicated to online filmmaking. Granger believes that YouTube has replaced Google as the “gold standard” of truth—especially for digital natives who’ve never known any other media except the Internet. For some, the idea of YouTube representing the gold standard for truth is more than a bit worrying.   More

Arts & Culture

Video Is Eating the World

Marc Andreessen famously said that software is eating the world. But the real online glutton may be video. Mark Nagel, the executive director of marketing for AT&T’s Foundry innovation centers, told the crowd at a recent FutureCast event about online filmmaking that video content is expected to grow 60% annually over the next few years. AT&T expects video to be 75% of its total network traffic by 2017. So does this eruption of online video represent an economic bonanza for filmmakers?   More

Arts & Culture

The Intimacy and Authenticity of Online Filmmaking

The idea that the Internet has democratized moviemaking has become one of the most repeated truisms of the digital age. But what, exactly, does the ability of everyone to post video on popular networks like YouTube, Daily Motion, and Vimeo mean to the filmmaker herself? According to the noted filmmaker Tiffany Shlain, it means that the art of intimacy and authenticity become central to the creative product. "I think there is an intimacy with the way people are experiencing it," Shlain said about online filmmaking at a recent Ericsson and AT&T hosted FutureCast. The event helped launch her latest short movie, "The Science of Character."   More

Arts & Culture

Will Movies Move to the Cloud?

The idea of cloud computing these days is, of course, hardly radical. But noted film maker Tiffany Shlain has a notion of what she calls "cloud filmmaking" that is considerably different than what people typically mean when they say "cloud." For her, making movies in the cloud means curating the self-made content (usually selfies) of others to produce her own work. But isn't that crowd-sourced movie making? Not according to Shlain. "I don't like the idea of crowd sourcing.... I get nervous in crowds." Shlain told "Digital Vertigo" author Andrew Keen at a recent Ericsson and AT&T hosted FutureCast event to launch her latest short movie, "The Science of Character."   More

Arts & Culture Learning Techonomy Events

Why STEM Isn’t Enough to Train Tomorrow’s Creators

In this year’s State of the Union address, President Obama committed to “reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers, and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math—the skills today’s employers are looking for to fill jobs right now and in the future.” Yet employers realize that it’s not only hard to find good developers; good designers are big difference makers as well. If we want to make the next generation of “artrepreneurs,” we need to add A for the Arts to turn STEM to STEAM.   More

Arts & Culture Video

Spike’s Gotta Have Kickstarter

Spike Lee is under fire for launching a Kickstarter campaign that seeks $1.25 million of crowdfunding to support his new film project, “The Newest Hottest Spike Lee Joint.” Lee’s campaign, launched July 22, so far has raised over $680,000 from more than 3,250 financial backers (and counting). With 18 days left, Lee has reached 50 percent of his goal. While Lee’s supporters—among them, acclaimed director Steven Sodenbergh, who pledged a sizable 10 grand—don’t mind answering his call for money, critics question whether it’s right for the veteran filmmaker to ask at all. They argue that in turning to Kickstarter, a platform typically used by novices and upstarts, Lee is diverting money away from smaller but equally deserving campaigns.   More

Arts & Culture E-Commerce

Kindle Worlds Is a Mixed Blessing for Both Authors and Readers

In my last post, I discussed the business implications of Amazon’s new fan fiction initiative, Kindle Worlds. But what does it mean for authors and readers of fan fiction? Kindle Worlds lets writers create stories about television shows created by Alloy Entertainment—including "The Vampire Diaries," "Gossip Girl," and "Pretty Little Liars"—using the same characters, setting, plot points, and story universe, thus producing original derivative fiction. As an author, I looked over the terms offered and a few less-than-attractive elements jumped out at me.   More

Arts & Culture Bio & Life Sciences

Cancer Genetics Goes Indie: Decoding Annie Parker Premieres

One thing was clear at last night’s New York premiere of Decoding Annie Parker, a movie about a woman with breast cancer: the film is a labor of love made by people who believe the dramatized true story they tell is important. No major studios were involved, and though it has a top-shelf cast (including Helen Hunt, Bradley Whitford, Rashida Jones, and Aaron Paul), the actors agreed to work for a fraction of their usual fees. When Annie Parker opens in select theaters this summer, it will be because a group of writers, donors, and cancer advocates were committed to sharing the lessons of Annie’s story.   More

Techonomy 12 Arts & Culture Techonomy Events Video

Richard Thompson in Conversation and Performance

Noted for his “guitar technique and strange, darkly-funny lyrics,” as Wikipedia puts it, Richard Thompson has received a lifetime achievement award from BBC and the Order of the British Empire from Queen Elizabeth. Here he performs and talks about his craft with Techonomy founder David Kirkpatrick at the Techonomy 2012 conference in Tucson, Ariz.   More

Arts & Culture

Print-on-Demand and the Golden Age of the Photobook

Many critics are proclaiming this the new golden age of the photobook. The arrival of the digital offset press in the last decade made it possible for the first time to print books at relatively low cost in editions as small as a single copy. The photobook publishing industry has since expanded from a handful of commercial presses putting out a few hundred titles each year by, to anyone with an Internet connection and an impetus publishing hundreds of thousands of books annually.   More

Arts & Culture

New Film Festival Software May Lead to Better Film Festivals

As the 2012 film festival season generates buzz about the latest and greatest in cinematic creation, one producer stands out as a real industry game-changer, and it’s not a film producer. It’s a solution to the organizational and logistical nightmare known as “event management” that for years has governed small- and large-scale festivals.   More

Arts & Culture

Is Artsy the Pandora of the Art World?

Art.sy, a free online fine art image repository, went live on Monday, promising to do for the world of fine art what Pandora and Netflix have done for music and film. The company has partnered with 275 galleries and 50 museums, digitizing about 20,000 images into what they are calling the "Art Genome Project." The repository recognizes about 800 tags, or "genes," developed and applied to the works by a dozen art historians. From objective criteria like time and place, to the more quirky attributes of contemporary art, each label is designed to link to other similar works that might be of interest to viewers or buyers.   More

Arts & Culture

Crowdfund Your Next Album Release, Even If You’re Already a Star

As a result of digitalization and widespread piracy, music album sales are less than half what they were a decade ago. The trend forces many artists to produce albums independently. An increasing number of musicians are circumventing major record labels by using crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter.   More

Arts & Culture

The Musician in Us: What the Future Will Sound Like

At the 2012 Grammys, the awards for Best Dance Recording, Best Dance/Electronica Album, and Best Remixed Recording went to a DJ who calls himself Skrillex. Electronic Musician described his music as “bass riffs that sound like fire-breathing dragons, vocal melodies that closely resemble Central African Mbenga Mbuti Pygmy music, and deftly placed vocal samples that typically propel huge rave crowds into a frenzy.”   More

Arts & Culture

Is Curating as Good as Photographing? Digital Camera Technology Is Transforming an Art

Aperture Foundation sparked one of the longest, liveliest, and most viral comment threads in the organization’s online history recently when it announced the upcoming publication of Doug Rickard’s A New American Picture. The hardcover collection of “street-photography,” originally published in 2010 and being re-released by Aperture with an additional 40 images, was gathered exclusively with Google’s Street View.   More

Arts & Culture Techonomy Events

Jeffrey Katzenberg on Achieving Real-time Rendering in Digital Animation

In this session from Techonomy 2011 in Tuscon, Ariz., Jeffery Katzenberg, Co-Founder and CEO of DreamWorks Animation SKG, details how new software that Dreamworks developed with Intel is revolutionizing the way his studio makes moves by allowing animation rendering in realtime. He says the software has the potential to change a number of industries, from design to oil.   More