Internet of Things Techonomy Events

How Should We Think About the Internet of Things?

Sara Gardner of Hitachi Data Systems explains why we need to take a bigger-picture view of the Internet of Things.   More

Analytics & Data Mobile Society

A Key Question of the Digital Era: How Much Information is Too Much?

image courtesy Shutterstock

Mobile technology is rapidly changing the way we live. But it brings an explosion in data consumption. Last year the world consumed 4 petabytes of data a month on mobile phones. (A petabyte is a million gigabytes.) Within five years, the amount will likely grow to over 24 billion petabytes. Is there a limit to how much info we can healthily consume?   More

Healthcare Partner Insights

Digital Tools Will Keep Us Healthier, a Davos Dinner Concludes

Philips had an artist/scribe documenting the discussion. This is one of her four drawings. (see others at bottom)

At a fascinating dinner in Davos, health care leaders tackled the changing face of healthcare in a digital age, and how technology can empower both patients and caregivers. The deeply-informed group was optimistic that huge progress is possible, and soon. The host was healthcare technology giant Philips,   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Genomic Medicine Is Here. American Healthcare Isn’t Ready.

Illustration for Techonomy by Jonathan Rosen

As many as half a million people have had their genomes sequenced. This data has already contributed to major medical success stories, but it is not yet clear that genomics can overcome the significant barriers that exist in traditional medicine to achieve its potential for American healthcare.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

Dear Scientists: This Is Why People Hate You

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Editors of the New England Journal of Medicine called scientists who make discoveries from publicly-shared data “research parasites.” Outrage ensued. Too many scientists believe they get a competitive advantage from data no one else has access to.   More

Analytics & Data Business Internet of Things

Balancing Privacy and User Experience: The Challenge of the Digital Age

Illustration for Techonomy by Clara Kirkpatrick

If companies fail to meet heightened data protection standards and other growing customer expectations around privacy and respect for their data, they may be fined, lose customer trust, and possibly put the entire company at risk. This is especially true in Europe. At the same time, companies that lose sight of the customer experience will not be successful long term. The conundrum is a kind of “digital Scylla and Charybdis”.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Government Healthcare

Why Obama Is Right about Cancer: Genomics

Image courtesy Shutterstock

President Obama’s optimistic language about finally nearing a cure for cancer in the State of the Union comes as creative approaches are showing more promise than ever. Two major announcements highlight important new opportunities to diagnose and treat cancer—and both are only possible because of advances in genomics.   More

Global Tech

CES Afterthoughts from Roger Kay

Kay Samsung 3

Entire armies of reporters did an amazing job of capturing the insanity of the CES show in all its glory. Instead, here are a few highlights that struck me, my moments of epiphany. There were three, maybe four. Everyone at the show tries to stand out one way or another, but it’s pretty difficult. There were 170,000 people all seeking attention. I was struck especially by TVs from Samsung and a compelling talk by Ericsson's Hans Vestberg.   More

Global Tech Internet of Things

Post-CES, Four Questions about the Internet of Things

Connected refrigerators, bras that monitor your heart rate, and, of course, autonomous vehicles were the kinds of things CES attendees focused on this year. It now seems inevitable that more or less everything will eventually be connected, and that raises new security, business, and technical questions for manufacturers, network providers, marketers, and consumers– the IoT ecosystem. What a few days scrambling around Las Vegas got me thinking.   More

Global Tech Internet of Things

The Internet of CES Things

The Amazon Echo that sits in my living room. It is still one of the most important things happening in tech, as CES underscored.

CES was a gigantic, if predictable, letdown when it comes to "consumer electronics." Everything seemed incremental. People ask each other "What's the most interesting thing you've seen?" My answer was an announcement not a device--Amazon's deal with Ford to put its Echo "Alexa" technology inside of cars. It was the Internet of Things that loomed large in the background--not to make connected toasters but to transform society with connected efficiency.   More

Global Tech Internet of Things Opinion

Thoughts on the Plane to CES

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Every January just after New Year's, as if to force upon recently idle strivers the urgency of redoubling their labors, converge hundreds of thousands of tech-focused leaders, strategists, inventors, financiers, retailers, and journalists. CES is American tech's biggest trade show, fiesta, business meeting, glad-handing exercise, walking course, and source of both elation and frustration. Says Slava Rubin, CEO of Indiegogo, who we ran into at our hotel's check-in: "CES is one giant networking event."   More

Global Tech Opinion

When Moore Is Not Enough – Why Our Growing Networks Require More Software

Image courtesy Shutterstock

The demand for communications bandwidth is expanding faster each year. We’re entering a stage where just Moore’s Law and faster and cheaper computing power will simply not be enough. The networks themselves need to become programmable platforms. The infrastructure needs to be as real-time, flexible and dynamic as our smartphones have become. Today software can scale up or down networks to meet user demands.   More

Global Tech Media & Marketing

The Facebook Pushback in India: Anti-Corporate, Anti-American, Anti-Poor

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg cares passionately about success around the world, especially India. He hosted Indian Prime Minister Modi at Facebook in September 2015.

There's huge controversy in India over Facebook's "Free Basics" Internet plan, part of the global Internet.org initiative the company has been spearheading. Facebook's aim, it says, is to get more people onto the Internet, since being online is essential for participation in any modern economy. In India, however, the project is encountering fierce resistance from elites who say it violates "net neutrality." But do all the critics--mostly upper-class and affluent Indian pundits, professors and anti-corporate activists--have a better way to get many millions of less-privileged Indians onto the Internet?   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare Society

The Three Best Digital Health Books of 2015

Here are three great books on the future of healthcare published in 2015. (image courtesy Shutterstock)

As new technologies continue to drive rapid change in the practice and business of healthcare, keeping up with the latest developments can be difficult. Fortunately, several great books on this topic were published in 2015. As a digital health entrepreneur, I found the following three particularly valuable: The Patient Will See You Now: The Future of Medicine is in Your Hands by Eric Topol; The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype, and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age by Robert Wachter; and Epic Measures: One Doctor. Seven Billion Patients. by Jeremy N. Smith.   More

Opinion Society

Unfazedly Optimistic Holiday Greetings!

Illustration by Clara Kirkpatrick

And so another year ends–with stunning speed and with surprising and slightly disturbing warmth here in New York. Techonomy wishes you happy and merry and a new year of continued optimism, despite the mood of the moment. Here are some thoughts about the kind of world we can collectively create, worth keeping in mind as a new year dawns amidst escalating short-sighted rhetoric and much distraction.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Global Tech Internet of Things

Techonomy’s Top Articles for 2015

At Techonomy we put on conferences and publish articles and videos. Our most popular articles this year tackled the conceptual problem with the Apple Watch, the Human side of the Internet of Things, how consumer genomics empowers consumers, tech and artificial intelligence progress in Ethiopia, and the need for the biotech industry to step up its game in communicating to the general public. It's a good flavor of the range of issues and topics that fascinate and motivate us. Keep with us in 2016 for much much more!   More

Global Tech Security & Privacy

Welcome to the Splinternet

Donald Trump has referred to "closing" the Internet in areas where the U.S. has enemies, while China's president, Xi Jinping, reasserted last week that each state has a sovereign right to control what its citizens can and can't do in cyberspace. Russia believes a state should control "its" Internet. A European Union regulation determines how non-EU companies can market to or monitor EU individuals. That four such distinct political cultures could all reach the same conclusion suggests that the days of a universal Internet are numbered.   More

Arts & Culture Startup Culture

Rock Stars of Tech

Linkin Park are not just a hugely successful rock band–they're also tech investors and advocates of business innovation. (photo courtesy Linkin Park)

Standing in a dark club during the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, among CEOs and political leaders, we all wait for The Killers to take the stage. I strike up a conversation with the person who just happens to be standing on my left–cultural icon and music superstar will.i.am. He shows me a device he's wearing, a sort of watch being developed by a company he started called i.am+. I can see how proud he is of it. He walks me through the functions, highlighting the user interface and how you can connect to the Internet without needing a phone. He pauses, looking for an indication of my thoughts. He's just one of a number of music industry veterans now finding their way into tech.   More

Opinion Security & Privacy Society

Are We Ready for Techno-Social Engineering?

The future of our personal data is in the hands of companies that author Morrison worries we cannot trust. (image courtesy Shutterstock)

Companies like Facebook and Google are developing new technologies to mine our data, to assess who we are and what we want, and – to hear the Internet giants tell it – deliver elegantly tailored experiences that help us better understand and interact with the world around us. David Lazer, an authority on social networks at Northeastern University, refers to it as the rise of the social algorithm and says it's an epic paradigm shift fraught with social and policy implications. Cardozo School of Law’s Brett Frischmann calls it techno-social engineering.   More

Bio & Life Sciences Healthcare

CellMax Life Is Changing the Rules for Cancer Screening

CellMax Life can identify cancer cells earlier, which may be a really big deal. (illustration courtesy Shutterstock)

An unheralded Silicon Valley biotechnology startup is fundamentally changing the rules of cancer screening. CellMax Life, headquartered in both Mountain View and Taipei, is deploying a technology that can detect cancer cells at their earliest stages. It has the potential to decisively change the economics of cancer screening and impacting cancer outcomes worldwide.   More